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knarthex

Making a Well with Sculpey, First time Sculpting with this....

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I will likely put it on one of the washers that I used for the circle template. It is the same thickness as a base.

 

8)

George

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So I primed a washer and stuck it on after painting...

Dry brushed the thing with a bunch of greys, plus some khaki, then washed it with Black Magic Wash, and while that was still wet, added some Brown Magic Wash.

Then dry brushed some more greys.

Added random splotches with Green, Purple, and Blue inks, then washed whole thing with Devlin Mud.

 

Pics:

034.jpg

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032.jpg

031.jpg

030.jpg

029.jpg

 

Then some more dry brushing, and the bottom was painted with Reaper Blue Liner.

040.jpg

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043.jpg

044.jpg

 

I just hit it with some Dullcote, and after another coat or 2, will start using Flocking for plants crawling on it...

 

Comments welcome!

George

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Well done.  You did a great job.  One of my pet peeves with stonework is when people paint them all the same colour instead of shading individual stones to break it up.  When you add some random coloured stones into the mix, it looks so much more realistic.  I can't tell from the last photo - did your final steps hide the stonework you did with the different colours?

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So I added some flocking on the well to look like plants growing on it, and started filling it with Water Effects.

When I get the level up to where I want it, this will be finished....

 

Pics

006_1.jpg

007_1.jpg

008_1.jpg

009_1.jpg

Sorry the pics are a little blurry...

 

Comments Welcome!

 

George

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possibly curve some of your plant life onto the surface of your water (on the last pour of course).  just to give the interior a bit of interest.

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possibly curve some of your plant life onto the surface of your water (on the last pour of course).  just to give the interior a bit of interest.

Good Idea!

 

Disaster!

 

I either poured to much water, so that it shrank as it dried, or I missed one hades of an air bubble! Don't know if it shows well, but here are some pics...

 

006_2.jpg

005_1.jpg

004_1.jpg

 

Going to attempt to fix it by adding a touch more water effects...

 

Wish me Luck!

 

George

 

Edit---> It's all Buglips Fault! He is the one that started me down this road of reporting errors in these Works in Progress!

Edited by knarthex
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thats not an issue  just use a syringe to slowly fill the hole with the water effects and let it cure again.  This may take a couple of tries so be patient.

 

using the syringe allows you to fill from the bottom up slowly and will prevent bubbles from forming.  The water effect will soften the already cured material and they will meld together.

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thats not an issue  just use a syringe to slowly fill the hole with the water effects and let it cure again.  This may take a couple of tries so be patient.

 

using the syringe allows you to fill from the bottom up slowly and will prevent bubbles from forming.  The water effect will soften the already cured material and they will meld together.

Thanks Robinh!

I use an eye dropper, and did what you suggested on this, and the Well of Chaos I am working on.

Fingers crossed!

 

George

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I think it came out very nicely. I can only sorta see the bubble that's vexing you, but I imagine it's more pronounced in person.

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Looks good. Quick comment on armatures for Sculpey and other polymer clays - you can use paper and cardboard as well - they don't melt with heat, and their burn point is higher than temperature used for curing the polymer clay.

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Thanks folks!

I think it came out very nicely. I can only sorta see the bubble that's vexing you, but I imagine it's more pronounced in person.

Yup, it's like that pimple you get when you are 17, YOU think it's huge, and no one else can see it....

 

Looks good. Quick comment on armatures for Sculpey and other polymer clays - you can use paper and cardboard as well - they don't melt with heat, and their burn point is higher than temperature used for curing the polymer clay.

Thanks for the info!

 

Don't know what I am going to try next with sculpey, likely something like stalagmites....

 

George

 

Edit---> Hole is now gone, a little bit of Water Effect at a time! And I just flocked the inside of the well with plant material. Pics when glue is dry....

Edited by knarthex
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OK here are the final (blurry) pics...

I can't seem to get the camera to pull in the whole image again....

As per robinh's suggestion, I coiled the plant growth down to the water on the inside of the well.

 

001_1.jpg

003_1.jpg

004_2.jpg

007_2.jpg

008_2.jpg

011.jpg

 

Comments and thoughts gladly accepted!

 

George

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