Jump to content

Heisler

Trenchworx WWI French FT-17

Recommended Posts

Very Nice!

 

There is a Museum near me with one of these, it's about 45 minutes away....

 

George

 

edit: what scale? 15 mm Fow or....

Edited by knarthex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are for 28mm. I use a WWI variant of Chain of Command (Too Fat Lardies) or Through the Mud and Blood (also Too Fat Lardies, or the Great War (out of print from GW).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This tank has seen a lot of action, driven through the muddy battlefield.

 

Very realistic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a great weathering job.

 

There's an FT-17 in front of the headquarters building at Anniston Army Depot. I was there on business a couple of weeks ago. They have it in a basic olive; I don't know whether that's for convenience or represents a US WWI look.

 

Youy underlying camo pattern looks a lot like some 1940 French I once did; hadn't realized they were using something similar in the forst war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a great weathering job.

 

There's an FT-17 in front of the headquarters building at Anniston Army Depot. I was there on business a couple of weeks ago. They have it in a basic olive; I don't know whether that's for convenience or represents a US WWI look.

 

Youy underlying camo pattern looks a lot like some 1940 French I once did; hadn't realized they were using something similar in the forst war.

 

There is a huge variety of camouflage patterns coming out of WWI far more than people realize. It is likely that in US Army service that is would have just been painted in basic olive, A lot would depend on if it had actually seen combat service or not. The FT-17 was produced under license in the US during the later part of the war and I'm not sure if those vehicles ever made it to Europe or not. The French camouflage patterns that were established in WWI ran right through to WWII. There are a lot of WWI myths out there it really is a fascinating subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Watchman
      Soooooo, those who read my Armada post may remember a statement I made that went like this: THIS IS WHERE I DRAW THE LINE... I think.   Well that went out the window when I saw some clearance planes called "Wings of War".  The models would look good on my display shelf... that is until I looked up  "Wings of War" and then "Wings of Glory" was listed also.  Needless to say when I saw the Videos they got me hook-line and sinker.
      Ah, the Emperor again, for scale comparison.
      The painting detail is quite impressive.
      So this is not the half of it.  Check out my next posting.
    • By Pingo
      http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/somme-soldiers-wearehere-manchester-piccadilly-11552983
       
      http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/secrets-behind-wearehere-revealed-how-8328558
       
      Yesterday was the hundredth anniversary of the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the brutal First World War battle in which more than a million men and boys were lost. On the first day alone Britain and the Commonwealth lost almost 20,000 souls.
       
      Along with other commemorations yesterday, British commuters and citizens were met by silent groups of men, some only boys, in full First World War battle dress, in public spaces across the entire UK.
       
      Each soldier had cards with the name and age (if known) of someone killed on the first day of the battle and the hashtag #wearehere . They were completely silent, except that sometimes groups would break into the song "We're Here Because We're Here", sung by British and Commonwealth soldiers at the time to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne".
       
      We're here because we're here because we're here because we're here,
      We're here because we're here because we're here because we're here.
       
      The sight was eerie. Many spectators were moved to tears.
       
      The source of the commemoration was kept secret until the end of the day. Turner-prizewinning artist Jeremy Delier conceived the memorial and teamed up with National Theatre director Rufus Norris for the project, under the umbrella of 14-18 NOW, a UK arts funding program to commemorate the First World War. Well over a thousand volunteers, nonprofessionals, aged 16 to 52 to reflect the people they commemorated, were kitted out and trained for the project.
    • By Heisler
      I know that there isn't a lot of interest here for historicals, but I figured I would post them since I just finished off 30 of them.
       
      With the incentive of a game I have been working hard on my US Marines. Most of the miniatures are from Brigade Games and the rest of them are from Great War Miniatures. The US Army Uniform and the US Marine P1912/1917 uniforms are close enough that you can't tell the difference on the table top except for color. The Marines in their "Forest Green" stand out in stark contrast from the Army. Marine "Forest Green" closely resembles German Feldgrau and I have a new recipe that comes a lot closer than my old one.
       
      Here is a look at a platoon in full Marine uniform
       

       
      Here is a link to my blog for the how I painted these up
      http://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2014/09/painting-wwi-us-marine.html
       
    • By Hellbeard
      The scale is 1:52. 1.80 meters convert to ~32mm. Might be called "28mm".
       

       

       

  • Who's Online   22 Members, 3 Anonymous, 0 Guests (See full list)

×