CashWiley

Cash's 2016 Art

161 posts in this topic

So the observant among you may have noticed no new mini WIPs from me this year. Since I'll be doing this stuff, I'll make a little WIP down here (and I'll be posting updates to my blog, maybe FB).

 

I'm taking both Drawing 101 and Intro to Oil Painting Portraiture at the local art institute (Munson Williams Proctor, a Pratt school). The drawing is pretty much just still life stuff, probably not too interesting to folks here, I'm really just learning to draw. But the portrait thing is pretty cool, we'll be learning all the stages of building an oil portrait. I never knew there was so much work to it! We're working from a live model (who has a great jawline, which is awesome for my future Frazetta stylings, heh), I'll draw this guy at least 2-3 times before I even start painting!

 

I was pretty much lost, everyone else in the class happily drawing and me all derp derp. Luckily, the instructor is great and really helped me learn how to construct the portrait, transfer measurements, etc (my drawing class is way more hippy 'there are no bad lines' kinda thing). Although most of the best looking parts are where she demonstrated on my drawing for me (since we throw this one away after the next drawing, heh). The woman next to me was a really good illustrative type artist, so I asked her a lot of questions, too (she reminds me of Frank Cho's work).

 

However, when we got to the instruction on highlighting and shading a 3d subject, it was nice to be the one in the class who was just reviewing known material and the rest of them were lost. Yay for all the hard work pushing contrast and working on materials on minis! So hopefully having that conceptual stuff will help as I struggle with, well, everything else!

 

Sorry for the ramble, here's the initial rough sketch (about 2 hours total on it):

 

IntroOilPortriture_1.jpg

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Wow Cash !

That is really an excellent base to a Painting !

(yeah, I know I always have been a supporter) but you just stepped into an area I know a bit about.

Your proportions are excellent, and the hint of underlying structural features are really astonishing considering

you are just learning !  It is, of course, all the miniature painting you have done.  That shading, and highlighting has

really taught you to "see" what lies beneath the skin.

 

I look forward to seeing more of what you are doing here.

(I used to paint in oils, most of my friends were painters/are painters).

Great Start, and keep on going !

Jay

Edited by Jasonator
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Thanks Jay, might need some pointers along the way so feel free to chime in if you see anything! I really like this teacher's process for measuring out a subject and transferring that to paper. I've got a long way to go with it, but it's the most comfortable I've ever felt drawing. I was chuckling because after she gave us a lesson on building a geometric measured sketch, the entire rest of the class (most of whom have taken this class at least once before) just did sketches and only the Cho-alike's drawing looked like the model. I didn't know enough to screw up, I just did what the teacher said. When everyone came around complimenting me, I said 'I just did what she told us to do...'

 

The details still really throw me. Most of the good parts of the nose and lips she drew. It's amazing, really. I built the structure, got the placement mostly correct but it looked off. She comes over and in three pencil strokes makes it look awesome. One reason I really like her instruction is she's smart and we were able to communicate at a good level of understanding.

 

Anyway, this is reeeally difficult, it's always tough being at this stage of learning. But I've done it for guitar and minis, so here we go again...and honestly, the knowledge of how to improve at an art form from those other pursuits does help in learning to learn new things.

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I really like that you are "Leaping out there" for something different.

I was raised in a household that had a Prat grad in it.

I was always told I was never good enough...

When I graduated from college I was asked if I ever painted, and when I said... "You know I suck".

I was told.. Oh, I'm sorry dear, you really are quite good, but I would never let you be an artist and starve..

Glad you got your got your degree !  Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

Enjoy the experience, Learn all the rules, it is SOO much fun to break them when you know what they are.

The above line is the clue to being a GREAT artist.  If anyone say's YOU CAN'T do that.. prove them wrong,

and you have created a unique signature for your self.

I will follow along with GREAT interest.

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First up a bit of home study for the portraiture class. Really struggling on eyes, so I spent an hour or so working on eyes from a book on chiaroscuro. Mostly focusing on defining the structure around the eye and the lids.

 

IntroOilPortriture_2.jpg

 

A couple of the better sketches from Drawing 101. These are 18x24, conte. The thing I like about this class is how loose it is, really low pressure and rapid fire drawings. These two were longer 5 minute drawings after lots of 2-3 minute drawings. Draw, spin the table of still life, draw, etc.

 

Drawing101_1.jpg

 

Drawing101_2.jpg

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Hey Cash;

These are excellent.

No they aren't "Perfect", but they are really good !

You really have the hang of these.  You get that subtle magical part in your work.

There is a huge difference in "a good drawing", and a "sketch"

You have the magic input.. that little touch that makes it art, NOT a sketch.

 

The subtle eye, with that shadowing in the corner, and the build up around it !

The last drawing with the intense delineation of the shadow and the matter lines.

Really good.  You are getting that NMM input into your work.

White next to the dark shadow.

Looking really good cash !

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Good catch, Jase; both of the class sketches were focused on trying to improve my use of line weight and put it to use for effect. I tend to have a pretty heavy hand, so I'm trying to sketch lighter and use dark for accents. We were also trying to improve our skills at measuring, you can see where I changed the coffee cup's size and the length of the bag behind it.

 

And I like to smudge with the chamois :) We're not really supposed to do it but it makes me so much happier I do it anyway.

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Second portraiture class. Adding shadow volumes, just roughing them in to transfer to canvas. This drawing will just be a guide after the transfer step. Also adding and changing some detail, since the model got a new haircut this week.

 

IntroOilPortriture_3.jpg

 

Then finishing up the torso, adding in more detail and final proportional tweaking. It's not quite where I want it to be, but frankly I'm kind of blown away that it turned out as well as it did. Last time I drew a human face was in the 80s! I credit the instructor, I just did what she said. And really, most of the people struggling in the class think they're too advanced to listen to the basics and every fault in their drawing is due to not following her instructions.

 

IntroOilPortriture_4.jpg

 

Next step will be to prep and prime the canvas with a mid-value earth tone (look at me with the lingos!) and transfer the drawing to it.

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Looking really fantastic Cash !

 

Recommendation, (drawing is just fine)... look at it and think to yourself.. where are the critical lines ?

Where are the values of shadow, highlight, and mid-tones.

Keep those in your head as you look and fine tune this magnificent drawing.

What makes this face special is what I am saying..

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This isn't a drawing for a finished thing, J. It's just devloping the proportions, learning the subject and blocking in where the shadow forms fall. Once I transfer it to canvas, I will begin to develop the values with paint. Hopefully I'll transfer it before the next class and work on it there, where I have some guidance.

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More art? I've been lurking and enjoying your efforts. I have nothing constructive to add but I can cheerleader with the best of them. :-D

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Tonight is oils class, going to try and remember to take some WIP shots :)

 

This past weekend I tried priming the canvas with gesso and sanding it out to smooth it over. Need to build some kind of contraption to help with that, I stopped before it was smooth because the sandpaper started to rub too much on the frame edges.

 

Last night I gave the canvas a wash of burnt sienna to bring down the value from white. I was chuckling when the instructor told us about it, because it's exactly what many of us do when basecoating minis, starting from the mid-tones (or in this case mid-value).

 

We did some negative space exercises in drawing class Tues night.

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I remembered to take some WIP shots! Not as many as I wanted to, but hopefully enough to get the idea across. Oil painting is a super difficult medium to learn, but for every 50 bad strokes, I'd get a good stroke that's making me fall in love with painting with oils. It's so buttery and nice, there's just a feel as things slide into place that is really cool.

 

Started the evening transferring the drawing. I covered the back of my drawing with a soft charcoal, then taped it into position on my canvas. I used a knitting needle to trace the outlines of the drawing, I guess burnishing? The charcoal sticks to the canvas as so:

 

IntroOilPortriture_5.jpg

 

Then I go over those lines with thinned burnt umber to establish the drawing on the canvas, as the charcoal would wipe off. I forgot to clean up the excess charcoal you can see between the lines and my initial white was grey...took me a minute to figure out why!

 

IntroOilPortriture_6.jpg

 

Then I got into a groove and forgot to take pics. Sorry! First I laid in the shadow blocks with thinned burnt umber. Then I blocked in the lighter areas of the skin with white, though I messed up and thinned it too much (I messed up a LOT but I learned even more, so it's all good!).

 

IntroOilPortriture_7.jpg

 

The last step I was able to get into tonight was the final step of the value blocking, where I soften the lines where the values meet up. At the same time, I'm starting to refer back to the model rather than my drawing. I hold three brushes, one clean and dry to soften with; and one each for the brown and white. This is where oils shine, the amount of open time to push and pull and slide things around. You can see where I got caught at the end of the session moving paint around the model's left eye. I significantly reshaped the eyes and lower lip, as well as the hairline and shadows on the forehead to match the current session.

 

IntroOilPortriture_8.jpg

 

I was getting a little discouraged as I struggled with the unfamiliar medium in the 3rd pic, but as I got the slightest bit more comfortable and started fixing and tweaking and some areas started to come together, I ended on a definite upbeat note, excited for the next session.

 

It's a really nice bunch of students and the instructor is completely amazing. She can give me two or three short pointers that get me through the trouble spots. Some of the other students didn't believe I've never painted in oils, or on canvas, or drawn portraits...until clean up time. I had no idea how to wash the brushes or really anything on how to clean up.

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Don't use the pumice soap to wash your brushes.

 

(I don't know what your class' studio space is like, but at my school they had huge, terrifically messy sinks and pump bottles of milky green gritty pumice soap to scrub art supplies off human skin. In memory I can still smell the stuff. We were supposed to use more delicate soap on our brushes but not everyone did.)

 

And good job. It's looking very well.

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Amazing, simply fantastic progress !

How wonderful to go on a voyage of discovery !

Love how you are incorporating your miniature painting into this..

They aren't unrelated !

Edited by Jasonator
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