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Soxrobin

First Mini Sculpt (BMPC)

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So, I made my first serious attempt at sculpting, and this is what I came up with.  This was done with Talespinner's BMPC tutorial, though I did not do much in the way of texturing since I was trying to do the whole thing in one sitting.  I will probably make another one piece by piece over the next week so I don't have to worry about squishing parts that already looked good.  I had a bit of trouble with smoothing some of the seams, which may have been partly because my greenstuff was a sample from a class I took at Gen Con 2014 that has been sitting unsealed on my painting desk since I brought it home.  (I assume this stuff has a shelf life of some kind.)  Overall I'm pretty happy with how it turned out, and more importantly, I learned a lot about what to do differently next time from doing this one.

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Any feedback or advice would be greatly appreciated!

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Looks cool!

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That looks good!

 

Don't forget to show it again when you paint it!

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 Nice.

 

 I personally think that things like textures and getting really smooth seams are things that you should work on learning after you get some basic competence at the sculpting process in general - much like painting, where people just starting out are in a rush to try things like layering and glazing before they've mastered the ability to paint a nice clean line, it's important to get good at the basics (shape, proportions, etc.) before you start sweating the details too much. Smoothing your seams gets easier with practice, and texture is a matter of technique (with each different texture requiring different techniques), so I wouldn't worry too much about those just yet.

 

As for the greenstuff... Technically, unmixed putty doesn't have an expiration date. However, the older it is, the harder it becomes (i.e., the more work it takes) to get good details with it. Storing it in your freezer slows down that process, but doesn't completely stop it. I think the oldest putty I've worked with was about five years old - it had been sitting on the shelf at the store for forever, and I had bought it just before I took almost a year off from the mini hobby so it was sitting in a drawer for quite some time. (I had to knead the putty with pliers for a bit before the two parts got pliable enough to mix, lol. But it was still usable.)

 

I personally think that putty is best used within six or eight months of purchase unless you're keeping it in your freezer, and after about two years it's really not useful for much other than making terrain. Most of the time, if I have less than half a package remaining and I can't instantly recall when I bought it, I just blow through the rest of it making practice pieces/scenery bits/etc. to finish it off, and buy another package for my important projects.

 

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Thanks, everyone!  I may or may not get to make another one this week like I had planned, but I definitely intend to paint this one up when I get a chance.  Is there anything special I should keep in mind when prepping greenstuff to paint, or is it just like prepping metal?

 

Mad Jack, that sounds like the trouble I was having with the greenstuff.  Kneading it together started to hurt my fingers, I had to pick out hardened pieces from between the two strips, and it just didn't seem to have the same feel it did when I took the class at Gen Con.  So, I guess I need to hurry and use it up so I can get some fresh stuff!  (Not that that should take long... it wasn't a very big sample, and I used more than half of it up making this guy.)

 

Hmph... now I want to sculpt tonight instead of finishing the first session of a game I'm suppose to run tomorrow....

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 You prime putty the same way you do metal...

As for the hardened pieces, it's always best to separate the two parts when you open the package and keep them apart when stored. Also, whenever you first open a package that doesn't come with the two parts already separated, inspect the place where they contact each other to see if you need to trim any of it off, and make sure there's no little bits of one sticking to the other when you separate them.

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Make sure you degrease the figure with dish soap or simple green to get off any oils and vaseline you left while sculpting.

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That's awesome!! I may try that tutorial one day too. And definitely wash the figure - I learned that the hard way a couple days ago when I started to prime a mini :zombie:

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