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Brown Liner Substitute

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I am looking for a means to "prime" my Bones minis, but use a light color. Brown Liner is amazing! It gives a contact surface of which I have not seen reject any MSP/MSPHD paints since trying it out after Buglips brought it to fame. When I paint metal or resin minis, though, I use a white primer and am finding that I prefer it to the darker undercoat for things like flesh tones.

 

Long story short: Is there something that adds durability to a paint job (and prevents flaking) like Brown Liner does? Maybe Brush-on Sealer or Matte Medium as an undercoat? Has anyone experimented enough to find this out already?

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I am looking for a means to "prime" my Bones minis, but use a light color. Brown Liner is amazing! It gives a contact surface of which I have not seen reject any MSP/MSPHD paints since trying it out after Buglips brought it to fame. When I paint metal or resin minis, though, I use a white primer and am finding that I prefer it to the darker undercoat for things like flesh tones.

 

Long story short: Is there something that adds durability to a paint job (and prevents flaking) like Brown Liner does? Maybe Brush-on Sealer or Matte Medium as an undercoat? Has anyone experimented enough to find this out already?

Have you tried the OTHER liners?

 

Red, Grey, Green, and Blue. I think Red is OOP right now tho.

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My issue is that the liners, seemingly by definition, are dark. I want a white or near-white color.

 

I am tempted to hit Bones with a Liner and then with a layer of primer, but would rather only apply one undercoat.

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Pokorny Arts Paint by Dwarven Forge certainly sticks to Bones and won't let go even with abusive handling; the only problem is it's fairly thick and so might obscure some detail. I use it mostly on Bones terrain pieces and props.

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Is there a reason not to use the brush on primer? It's white. Seems like it would be perfect for priming. 

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My issue is that the liners, seemingly by definition, are dark. I want a white or near-white color.

 

I am tempted to hit Bones with a Liner and then with a layer of primer, but would rather only apply one undercoat.

There are two substances that might be worth a try: Future floor polish and White Gesso.

 

I put us in charge of this research.

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Is there a reason not to use the brush on primer? It's white. Seems like it would be perfect for priming.

 

This was my thought as well.
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Is there a reason not to use the brush on primer? It's white. Seems like it would be perfect for priming.

This was my thought as well.

 

 

 

Is there a reason not to use the brush on primer? It's white. Seems like it would be perfect for priming.

This was my thought as well.

 

It has been a while since I tried, but the Reaper Brush-On Primer beaded up on me quite a bit in the past when put directly on Bones. Also, does it give the same chip-resistance? I could try this again.

 

I was kind of hoping that someone would say "the stuff found in liners that makes it so awesome is actually the same as ________, just without and pigment."

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If you're looking for brush on primer, I suggest mixing a liner with brush on primer. Not white, but much lighter.

 

I have also used Parma Faskolor white. It is formulated for plastic RC car bodies. You must not thin it with water or it will bead up. I don't even use a wet brush. It also looks splotchy when wet, but evens out as it cures. It is thin, bonds well to plastic and is flexible when cured.

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The primer only beads up on me when I haven't scrubbed the figure first (with soap and an old toothbrush) or when I start with a wet brush and introduce water to it. 

 

Shake the dickens out of it, and paint it on straight out of the bottle with a dry brush. 

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Is there a reason not to use the brush on primer? It's white. Seems like it would be perfect for priming. 

 

Brush-on primer is designed for use on metal minis. Tests have not indicated that it works especially well on Bones directly.

 

White or light gray liner would be ideal as a primer; this does not currently exist.

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I've used a mix of the liners and brush on primers on bones without any adverse effects. Works as well as the liners, just make sure to always scrub your bones ::D:

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I've used the brush-on primer on bones and it gave a nice smooth durable surface. The only problem I had was hairline cracks on the surface of the first mini I tried it with. I think this was due to me not waiting long enough for it to cure properly.

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