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Yeah if this was the 5E game I'd be fine with a Tabaxi, just not a freaking Catboi, but this was a Rules Cyclopedia/BECMI/Basic session, with its human classes, elves, dwarves and halflings... so for a one-off you'd hope he could put aside his snowflake tendencies and just play a human monk, or pick an elf or a dwarf or something.

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Wondering if D&D Beyond is worth it for me?

Just started a 5e campaign at the high school library's after school game club. I have 9 players (generally only 5-6 show up), but I'm the only one who owns the books, plus the library's single copy of the PHB (when it isn't checked out). So I've found myself spending a lot of time putting together decent PC character sheets for the kids, so that there isn't a lot of delays for passing around the books and looking up abilities - I've got every ability referenced by book and page number.  That's not proving to be good enough for the group of novice players I have so my next thought is to put the applicable rules for each character into their PC folders. 

However, that's going to result in a LOT of typing, which will eat into my prep time.  That got me to wondering if D&D Beyond would allow me to create PCs and print them out with all the applicable rules for them? 
 

7 hours ago, Unruly said:

 

I hate those people. My campaign is not your campaign. If I say that this list of playable races I have in my hand is all you can choose from, because that's all that exists in my world, then that's all you can choose from. And no, you can't say "I'm an X, but everyone should just act like I'm a Y." I know that it's a cooperative game, but if I'm the one putting in all the work to make the world then you're gonna have to make some compromises, at least in race, for your character to actually exist in it. Now classes? That's a different story. The only restrictions I'll put on classes, so long as they're official, will be social/RP ones. Like arcane magic being legally restricted or something.

 

 

Of course, when you're running an organized play game you have to follow their rules. But even then, his whole Rakasta thing wouldn't fly because Rakasta don't have an official release. He could play a Tabaxi, if he's got Volo's Guide in his possession, but then he'd probably also want to play some subclass that isn't in the PHB and from my understanding the AL limits you to PHB+1 for character sources. Because that's my experience with people like that...

On the D&D 5e FB group, this point comes up repeatedly, and is often a major bone of contention.  It appears that this is one of the areas where there are two camps - those who believe that if it's in the official rules, it should be playable without DM restrictions, and those who believe that DMs have the right to tailor their settings. 

Further complicating the matter are two other factors - one, those DMs who ban stuff for rule reasons (IE, no warlocks because I hate Eldritch Blast).   Two, the fact that players/DMs who believe setting limits are OK can generally play under DMs who don't believe in limits, while the reverse is harder.

 

Where was I going with this? Oh yeah, anyway, I really wish that people would accept the fact that not everyone's D&D is exactly the same, and that the different play styles are just fine.  If a certain group or campaign style doesn't work for you, move on with no hard feelings, and the entire D&D/RPG community will be better off for it.   Don't try and force your style of play on others - just find another group.  

I'm a DM who likes to plan my settings out, and make them mesh.  I tend to restrict races and even classes to fit my settings.  But I'm upfront about my restrictions and reasons for those restrictions.  Most players who have issues with them simply walk on by, no hard feelings.  But a couple of times I've had players attempt to bully me into allowing their choice, but finally bend and play within my restrictions because they had friends playing in my group - and they ultimately ended up being disruptive players.   The last time it happened to me was the last straw, but I've been lucky and it hasn't happened since. I'm not sure how I'm going to handle it next time. 

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The player who had the magic-user last time made a dwarf this time. Two hit points. Made sure to get plate mail and a shield.



The player who hadn't made it to a previous session got to learn a bit about D&D basic. Made a Mystic (monk) with completely cruddy charisma thanks to some less than stellar rolls. His snowflakeness started cracking through as he insisted his character was "a Rakasta that passes for human" and also that "Rakasta look more like Shifters in MY setting" and you know, I don't really restrict a lot race-wise in the 5E campaigns so you'd think you could indulge the "human with classes or a demihuman" of Basic just this once...

 

 

The surprise for the character is when he discovers that he is human - with the delusion of being a Rakasta....

 

In his mind he may be sprouting claws, but in reality he is scratching away with scribbly scrabbly human fingernails....

 

The Auld Grump - base damage 1d2-1....

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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1 hour ago, kristof65 said:

Wondering if D&D Beyond is worth it for me?

Just started a 5e campaign at the high school library's after school game club. I have 9 players (generally only 5-6 show up), but I'm the only one who owns the books, plus the library's single copy of the PHB (when it isn't checked out). So I've found myself spending a lot of time putting together decent PC character sheets for the kids, so that there isn't a lot of delays for passing around the books and looking up abilities - I've got every ability referenced by book and page number.  That's not proving to be good enough for the group of novice players I have so my next thought is to put the applicable rules for each character into their PC folders. 

However, that's going to result in a LOT of typing, which will eat into my prep time.  That got me to wondering if D&D Beyond would allow me to create PCs and print them out with all the applicable rules for them? 

I truely love D&D Beyond, but I think in your situation it would only be beneficial if they play on laptops/Ipads anyway. 

D&D Beyond does produce the normal 5e character sheet if you choose the print-out option, and the online sheet doesn't look very printer friendly. 

 

There is a set of "Class Character sheets - The Bundle" by a guy named Emmet Byrne on dmsguild, that could fit your needs. It has all the rules for the individual classes printed on there, and it's layouted in a way that showcases the important bits (e. g. Sorcery Points for Sorcerers). We use those for a friend's group who only meets once every few months, because people forget everything in that timeframe.

Spellcards have been of great use for me as well.

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It's fine if you can keep the guy under control but yeah he's got this insistence not to even want to stick to the books....

 

Like, he doesn't just want to play a Tabaxi/Rakasta, he's gotta play one that looks like a *expletive deleted* abhorrent Catboi from Final Fantasy games.

https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/finalfantasy/images/5/5b/Miqote_CG.png/revision/latest?cb=20130407184400

Because that's what they look like in HIS setting.

 

And it's problematic to remind him that I'm flexible to a point but he's gotta remember he's playing in my game. Sometimes it sticks, though, but this *expletive deleted* catboi monk, he will not let that go.

 

 

2 hours ago, kristof65 said:

I'm a DM who likes to plan my settings out, and make them mesh.  I tend to restrict races and even classes to fit my settings.  But I'm upfront about my restrictions and reasons for those restrictions.  Most players who have issues with them simply walk on by, no hard feelings.  But a couple of times I've had players attempt to bully me into allowing their choice, but finally bend and play within my restrictions because they had friends playing in my group - and they ultimately ended up being disruptive players.   The last time it happened to me was the last straw, but I've been lucky and it hasn't happened since. I'm not sure how I'm going to handle it next time.  

This is something I'm finding myself in need to do for the next campaign, I want it to have strong tones of the divine, hellish, extraplanar and overly monstrous (including dragons) are mysteries to even the greatest of sages, so stuff like genasi, dragonborn, aasimar, tiefling as well as strongly magical races (firbolg, triton) will not exist, and subclasses with strong extraplanar flavors (Circle of Dreams druid, Horizon Walker ranger, Ancestral Guardian and Storm Herald barbarians [why the hell are so many 5E Barbarian archetypes so magical? That really shouldn't be the flavor barbarians get. They're barbarians]).

Everyone has mostly been okay with this (one player raised a minor stink because they want to play an aarakocra druid and if that dies they wanted to play a firbolg paladin but like... I don't plan on killing off your druid...) but I fully expect when session zero comes along... the player will again request the catboi monk.

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3 hours ago, BlazingTornado said:

It's fine if you can keep the guy under control but yeah he's got this insistence not to even want to stick to the books....

 

Like, he doesn't just want to play a Tabaxi/Rakasta, he's gotta play one that looks like a *expletive deleted* abhorrent Catboi from Final Fantasy games.

https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/finalfantasy/images/5/5b/Miqote_CG.png/revision/latest?cb=20130407184400

Because that's what they look like in HIS setting.

 

And it's problematic to remind him that I'm flexible to a point but he's gotta remember he's playing in my game. Sometimes it sticks, though, but this *expletive deleted* catboi monk, he will not let that go.

 

 

This is something I'm finding myself in need to do for the next campaign, I want it to have strong tones of the divine, hellish, extraplanar and overly monstrous (including dragons) are mysteries to even the greatest of sages, so stuff like genasi, dragonborn, aasimar, tiefling as well as strongly magical races (firbolg, triton) will not exist, and subclasses with strong extraplanar flavors (Circle of Dreams druid, Horizon Walker ranger, Ancestral Guardian and Storm Herald barbarians [why the hell are so many 5E Barbarian archetypes so magical? That really shouldn't be the flavor barbarians get. They're barbarians]).

Everyone has mostly been okay with this (one player raised a minor stink because they want to play an aarakocra druid and if that dies they wanted to play a firbolg paladin but like... I don't plan on killing off your druid...) but I fully expect when session zero comes along... the player will again request the catboi monk.

 

Special snowflakes can be a special problem.

 

One of the worst Vampire Storytellers that I have ever played with allowed the girl he was interested in use Dance for both unarmed and melee attacks and for her Dodge - at a reduced DC. But, hey! It worked - they have now been married for over ten years.... <_<

 

Megan has never tried any such shenanigans. :wub: I can't really say that any of her characters has been remotely that bad.

 

She is a pleasure to have in my games. ::):

 

The Auld Grump

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Suddenly I don't feel like such a bad player anymore, seeing a lot of the struggles DMs have to deal with from others o_O

 

In the past, I've done some oddball characters (a half-tiefling / half-elf, although I don't remember the class), but before locking such a concept in my head I had specifically asked if they'd be okay with that...  Turned out the DM wanted to play up on the demon politics in his world, so I was told yes, but there would be... Consequences to deal with as my character.  I'd say so, eventually being kidnapped and dragged away from my party, held randsom from them, told if I tried to escape they die yadda yadda.  Yeah, was actually a really fun ark, even if my character's mind kiiiind of broke in that one - but in the "oops, I wound up killing an important political player in said demon city" kind of way.

 

Meanwhile the other players (who had been left totally untouched and unharmed other than being knocked out once I was dragged off by said demons) were, y'know, working out how to rescue me from the center of said demon city, and I just left a trail of deal bodies... Oops.  In my defense, the more.... Civilized part of my mind was kind of locked away, so my character didn't really have any qualms about taking out anyone who looked at him the wrong way... Half-elf side was NOT happy with that when he came back into control. 

 

 

 

Err, went a bit off the rails there.  I honestly can't see why so many players have an issue with just asking what's allowed first, and then working from there so they fit into the story, and if things don't mesh, so be it, you move on and work with someone else.  It allows for everyone to have a good time and just enjoy the evening/lunch period /whatever timeframe you're using. 

 

But my first major campaign (Rifts) that I was in I spent four hours negotiating with the DM as to what I could be allowed to play as and would fit in with the story.  Why four hours?  You try choosing a character concept when you have eight source books and world books you're allowed to pull from.. 

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4 hours ago, Nunae said:

I truely love D&D Beyond, but I think in your situation it would only be beneficial if they play on laptops/Ipads anyway. 

D&D Beyond does produce the normal 5e character sheet if you choose the print-out option, and the online sheet doesn't look very printer friendly. 

 

There is a set of "Class Character sheets - The Bundle" by a guy named Emmet Byrne on dmsguild, that could fit your needs. It has all the rules for the individual classes printed on there, and it's layouted in a way that showcases the important bits (e. g. Sorcery Points for Sorcerers). We use those for a friend's group who only meets once every few months, because people forget everything in that timeframe.

Spellcards have been of great use for me as well.

I signed up for a free account, and tried it out.  It does do what I want, but I'll have to spend another $120 to get all the materials I need.  For $20, I can pay a couple of the kids to type it all up. 

The Class Character sheets by Mr Byrne look nice, but not being form fillable/savable is a deal breaker. 

 

28 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

But my first major campaign (Rifts) that I was in I spent four hours negotiating with the DM as to what I could be allowed to play as and would fit in with the story.  Why four hours?  You try choosing a character concept when you have eight source books and world books you're allowed to pull from.. 

Had some 3.5e character creation sessions like that.  In our group, we must have had 40+ books to choose from between us all. 

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21 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

But my first major campaign (Rifts) that I was in I spent four hours negotiating with the DM as to what I could be allowed to play as and would fit in with the story.  Why four hours?  You try choosing a character concept when you have eight source books and world books you're allowed to pull from.. 

 

Short version - Why four hours? Because it's Rifts....

 

Some great concepts, a middling game system, and terrible layout and editing.

 

And, locally, at least, some of the most polite gamers that I have ever met, who did a very nice job of explaining the good points of the game, without downplaying the bad parts.

 

 (Least polite was a GURPS group, followed by some... militant... 4e D&D players.)

 

The Auld Grump

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22 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

But my first major campaign (Rifts) that I was in I spent four hours negotiating with the DM as to what I could be allowed to play as and would fit in with the story.  Why four hours?  You try choosing a character concept when you have eight source books and world books you're allowed to pull from.. 

 

22 hours ago, kristof65 said:

Had some 3.5e character creation sessions like that.  In our group, we must have had 40+ books to choose from between us all. 

I'm running into this for the Pathfinder PBP character I'm making now.  Hundreds of traits, over a thousand feats, bunch of archtypes and since I choose to make a druid, I've got animals to deal with too.  Plus all of the magic items.

 

Makes me really appreciate 5E all the more.  I can knock out just about any character for that in under 30 minutes.

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22 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

I honestly can't see why so many players have an issue with just asking what's allowed first, and then working from there so they fit into the story,

 

Getting annoying about that sort of thing is obviously a poor choice. (Though since the social skills of a significant portion of the roleplaying audience are ... a bit stunted ... it can be useful to cut people a bit of slack. But "a bit of slack" runs out pretty darn quickly, IMO.

 

That said, there are characters that I've wanted to run for a long time that I've never been able to play because the groups I play with have never allowed the books. The characters I've played instead have been just fine, but I'd have had more fun, I think, trying out the more off-the-wall stuff. (And I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't have been running anything gamebreaking. Which might be less true about the characters I did run, but they followed the campaign guidelines, so..... :devil:)

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41 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

That said, there are characters that I've wanted to run for a long time that I've never been able to play because the groups I play with have never allowed the books. The characters I've played instead have been just fine, but I'd have had more fun, I think, trying out the more off-the-wall stuff. (And I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't have been running anything gamebreaking. Which might be less true about the characters I did run, but they followed the campaign guidelines, so..... :devil:)

 

I had a friend tell me he doesn't allow Monks in any of his campaigns because they're Asian, and he runs European fantasy. His response to my wanting to play a dwarven monk as the stereotypical drunken bar brawler was "Just play a fighter that doesn't use weapons. It's the same thing." Because apparently he thought that playing a class in a way that invalidates half of it's abilities is the same as playing a class that's meant to punch, kick, and headbutt the enemy.

 

So instead I played a Dragonborn Pact of the Tome Warlock with the Great Old One patron. I even cleared it with him first, because he's also one of those "if it isn't in Tolkien, I probably won't allow it" kind of DMs, and he said it would be fine. I told him ahead of time that my Warlock was going to be a fervent proselytizer, who was basically the insane version of an Evangelist preacher, and he said that was fine. Well, the Great Old One patron gives you telepathy up to 30ft, and you don't even need to share a language for your target to understand you, so I decided my character was a mute who'd had bitten off his own tongue when his mind was touched by Cthulhu. So come game time I sat in the town square telepathically preaching about Cthulhu to everyone.

 

He immediately had a guard arrest me for disturbing the peace, to which I argued that the guard would never know I was doing anything other than sitting on a bench because telepathy has no tells. It's non-verbal, there's no visual sign, and since I've never spoken no one would know my voice. He got angry because everyone at the table agreed with me that it was BS that a guard would come up to someone who was just sitting in the square and arrest them for disturbing the peace when they hadn't even done anything. It turned into this big thing at the table, and the DM just got mad at me because I was "ruining his game." I pointed out that everything I was doing was stuff that I had told him I was going to do, and he had approved. He said he didn't realize that warlocks got telepathy or else he wouldn't have allowed me to play one.

 

I told him I'd quit the warlock if he'd let me play my bar brawler dwarf monk, he still said no, and the game went on with me seemingly ticking him off every two seconds by doing stuff he didn't expect. And it wasn't like I was doing the "Ooh! Squirrel!" type stuff where I just ignored him and went off to do my own thing, it was just that he didn't seem to like the way I was doing the things he wanted us to do. Like using telepathy to intimidate goblins by making myself that voice inside their heads telling them to run away from a fight...

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I had a somewhat similar issue in a Pathfinder game . The issue wasn’t the GM but one or two of the other players. The Flit household was disinvited from the game.

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37 minutes ago, Unruly said:

I had a friend tell me he doesn't allow Monks in any of his campaigns because they're Asian, and he runs European fantasy. His response to my wanting to play a dwarven monk as the stereotypical drunken bar brawler was "Just play a fighter that doesn't use weapons. It's the same thing." Because apparently he thought that playing a class in a way that invalidates half of it's abilities is the same as playing a class that's meant to punch, kick, and headbutt the enemy. 

Admittedly, I wouldn't allow that kind of dwarven monk either, as the flavor is heavily tied to heavy physical and spiritual training.

Not because they're asian in inspiration, though. It's a fantasy world and western monasteries could just as well have this kind of training put in.

 

D&D really could use some sort of more strength-based unarmed brawler class or something but the monk isn't a drunken bar brawler. This is an issue I face every time I find character inspiration in a pro wrestler.

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22 minutes ago, BlazingTornado said:

Admittedly, I wouldn't allow that kind of dwarven monk either, as the flavor is heavily tied to heavy physical and spiritual training.

Not because they're asian in inspiration, though. It's a fantasy world and western monasteries could just as well have this kind of training put in.

 

D&D really could use some sort of more strength-based unarmed brawler class or something but the monk isn't a drunken bar brawler. This is an issue I face every time I find character inspiration in a pro wrestler.

 

Not really. Especially not the Open Hand Monk. Just about everything it has can be summed up as "I know where to hit, I know how to take a fall, and I'm as pickled as Keith Richards." Only once you hit level 15 or so do you start to get to the truly fantastical parts, where you don't need to eat and can turn yourself invisible and stuff. But that's also when all the other classes start to get their crazy stuff too, like barbarians that can fly just because they're angry. But for the most part the Open Hand as a bar brawler works pretty well.

 

For Way of Shadow and Way of the Four Elements that's definitely true though, as those are the Dragonball Z types that start throwing magic around from pretty much day 1.

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