Kang

Kang's Kreations - Molten Metal Madness

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Good luck!!!

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Thanks...  I'd settle for good weather!

 

Kang

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Posted (edited)

Well I finally got the non-rainy weekend I've been waiting and waiting and waiting for, time to cast something!  Figured I'd pick something fun and hopefully not too tricky, to cast in aluminum, to ease me back into things after a long winter hiatus that took over most of the spring as well...

Too bad, it froze up before the mold filled.  

 

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But the part of it that did fill looks pretty good, mostly...  Here's a closer look at the front.

 

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The edge on the far side from the sprue looks pretty good too I think.  Almost zero clean up needed at the mold's parting line where there is normally flashing to clean up.

 

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The edge on the sprue side - not as nice.  There could be any number of reasons for this, I have asked the folks at the hobby metal casting forum I hang out on for their thoughts...

 

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I think the gate connecting the long runner to the skull shaped ashtray shaped sand hole needs more contact with both the runner and the part...  Actually I think this might be the biggest part of my problem here...  I've had loads of lost foam castings not fill before, but this is the first time this has happened to me with a sand casting.  :(

 

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Couple shots of the section that did not fill:

 

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Guess I'll just have to try again with a few tweaks to how I designed the mold, and maybe heat up the melt a little hotter next time in hopes of getting that thin section to fill...  

 

Wish me luck. Or at least more dry weather!
 

Kang

 

edit - PS.  The pattern I used to make the sand mold was cast in Hydrostone, a super durable form of plaster.  You guys probably know of it as good stuff to make (ie.) HirstArts bricks for gaming terrain because it is strong enough to survive the game table.  It worked great for patternmaking too; it held up to my ramming molding sand against it like a champ, without any cracking or damage to the pattern.  Thanks again to local forumite CanuckOtter for selling me his extra hydrostone and saving me a 5 hour road trip to the big city to buy the stuff from the nearest supplier!

 

edit 2 - ok my pix are all broken, here's the main one of the failed casting.  Sorry this thread got blasted so bad, I'm fixing individual posts as best I can, as I find the time.

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Edited by Kang
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Posted (edited)

Another weekend it's not raining: another attempt at the skull ashtray...

I spent some time drying out about half of my molding sand a bit.  Maybe a bit too much, but I had become convinced it was too damp.  And I decided to gate in at a thick section on the other side of it, closer to this thin parts that did not fill the first time.

 

I also added another riser, near where the gate came in the first time I tried casting it.  To act as a vent so that gases (ie. steam) could not be trapped inside the mold and also hopefully to feed any shrinkage, since the reason I gated in there last time was because I thought it seemed like the thickest part the furthest from the thinnest parts.  Molds need to be designed with directional shrinkage in mind - thin sections freeze first and they shrink as they do so, drawing in molten metal from still-molten thicker sections.  The trick is to have an even thicker sacrificial "riser"  to take that shrink, and it needs to be attached to the last section(s) to freeze.  Despite moving the sprue, I still wanted some hot metal there to feed the thick part on the far side from the new sprue location, hence the extra riser.  Once the risers, the highest parts in the mold, began to fill, I even planned to stop pouring into the sprue and finish topping up the mold through that far riser to heat it up a little more.  Maybe that was all overkill, but I thought it might help.

 

The sand I dried out did not seem very strong, so after the first layer of sand in the mold I began adding handfuls of the other half of my sand that was still a little more moist along with the dry stuff, I think I this helped but the sand was still kind of weak at the parting line in the drag (bottom half of the mold, where the skull's face and the runner connecting the sprue to the gates was molded).  I did not use just the dry sand right up against the pattern in the cope (top half, which only contained the risers, sprue, and gates) I used a mix of the two so that turned out a little better.  

 

But the drag had more loose sand coming off the parting line in the drag than I had hoped to see when I flipped it over...  It's possible I just didn't ram it up quite as well as the first time - I finally found my aluminum rammer, and I was a little nervous that I'd chip the pattern if I rammed as hard as I did with the improvised wooden one I used last time.

 

I had a little trouble connecting the far side riser to the mold cavity, some sand broke off, but nothing disastrous as it was all in the cope and the part was all in the drag.  Forgot to take any more molding pix due to fiddling around fixing that though.

 

Here are the molds, spiderproofed and waiting.  Spiders can turn into steam explosions when they crawl in and get trapped in a mold full of molten metal, and steam explosions can chuck molten metal at your face, which will ruin your whole day and probably your casting too...

 

#12 crucible loaded up in the furnace...

 

Crucible is full of wheelium (backyard metal caster's lingo for aluminum car wheel alloy, usually  A356, a great general purpose  a casting alloy) blobs I retrieved from a campfire I lot in my backyard last summer to break down some large aluminum scrap into crucible sized bites.  And you can the runner from the last attempt poking up there too.  Piled loosely,  nothing wedged in tight - things expand when they get hot, and crucibles are expensive and more fragile than flexible...  Seemed like it began melting before the furnace was even hot enough to start the oil drip, I must be getting the hang of running it on propane or something!  I didn't even have to relight it once this time...  :). And I even remembered to lay out my homemade flux, a eutectic of sodium chloride and potassium chloride.  Helps separate out the dross from the clean metal at skim time, and improves the flow of the metal.  I made sure to pour hotter this time to ensura a complete fill of the thin sections.

 

It filled!  Woohoo!

 

Not quite as nice and clean as the good parts of the first attempt, but it looks pretty darn good in this pic I'd say... :)  Just a tiny bit of crustiness you can see here if you look really close, such as around the top of the eye sockets and the little divot in the hinge of the jaw must have had some sand break off in the mold somehow.  I blame myself for drying out my sand too much.  You can also see where I broke some sand joining the riser near his teeth to the rest of the mold cavity.  That extra metal in the cope side only touches about 2mm of the back of the ashtray, should be easy to clean off.

 

Gating details.  The sprue is the skinny tapered one.  The pouring basin on top of it is oval shaped to prevent whirlpooling which would suck air into the mold.

 

Broken sand on the drag side... :(  Including that jaw divot again in the second pic.  

 

I'll have to do some grinding and some covering up of grinding marks to fix this one at the top of his head.

 

Jaw divot flaw close-up, I will leave as is, I think.

 

Risers didn't feed much, but there's no shrink anywhere I can see, so I guess they fed enough...

 

Next one'll be perfect... :)

 

Kang

 

edit - OMG, I just sold it; I wasn't even sure I would try to, but somebody who I had shown a pic of the first one that did not fill just asked me if I could make one for her son who is a smoker.  I gave her a reduced price because that little divot in the jaw got filled in...  Not that I have a regular price; I'm only a hobbyist after all... but I do have a hobby budget to not exceed if I can help it.  This helps.  2nd sale ever, woo-hoo!  Hopefully it'll remind the recipient of the grim fate that awaits all smokers, and will inspire him to quit.  I myself am off the combustion for 3 years as of tomorrow; for me, e-cigs were the way out.  I still vape, but at least it has kept me from smoking some 30,000 cigarettes to date...

 

edit 2 - made the exchange this morning, she seems very happy with it!  I asked, she isn't giving it as a grim reminder of the smoker's fate; her son just likes skulls and is a smoker.

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Edited by Kang
Replaced broken pic links with uploads... Order and actual selection of pix may differ slightly from original postst
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Posted (edited)

My green sand (molding sand for metal casting) needs refreshing (ie. it is a little too dry) but it was way too hot and humid to think about doing that over the weekend, so I worked on finishing up a couple of other castings - one poured just recently, and another from last October.

 

Made a nice base for this small cast aluminum anthill casting I poured last weekend.  I made it out of a piece of an ash tree that lived in a friend's front yard for 80+ years until the emerald ash borer betle got to it. Once the bug killed it, my friend had it milled into lumber since the bugs only kill the roots and make the bark fall off, but don't actually damage the wood.  He's gotten into a bit of a woodworking hobby ever since, and has made some nice ash table- and coutertops.  And showed me that a big thickness planer is a fun machine to play with (certainly more fun than a hand plane, at least for me, and at least on wood that's this hard!) I ended up with a lot of the edge cuts, used for small projects like this and to fuel my bulky scrap melter when I'm turning aluminum alloy car wheels into small blobs that can fit into a crucible.  I think the beetle tracks that are visible on the live edge of the ash slab add a nice burrowing bug themed touch to the whole piece...  I attached to the slab by making a hole in the bottom of the aluminum base an tapping it for a standard 1/4" bolt, drilling a 1/4" hole in the slab and drilling out the underside wider to hold a washer and the head of the bolt, then simply bolting the casting to the slab.  I glued a piece of red felt to the underside of the slab to get rid of a tiny bit of wobble I accidentally sanded into the underside of the wood, which worked great and may save the furniture from a bit of scuffing..

 

And I also finally got around to electrifying my cast aluminum Jack O'Lantern lamp, which I made using the lost foam casting method.  I believe I posted some WiP pix o it above somewhere...  I was surprised how easy it was, really I just had to drill a hole in the stem to fit a threaded tube (replacement lamp part from the hardware store) for the cord to pass through, and wire the cord to the light bulb socket that screwed into the inside-the-lamp end of the tube.  I was going to tap threads for the tube but I realized I did not have the proper 27tpi tap for that diameter.  So I drilled the hole a hair too big and chucked up the externally threaded tube itself in my drill to use as its own tap, and luckily the hole I drilled was just loose enough that this worked.  A regular CFL bulb just fits without touching the bottom of the inside, as does an old-timey incandescent bulb (which did not take long to cook itself dead inside the metal lamp) but eventually I want to find a small (cooler) LED bulb for it, ideally in orange or red.  Unfortunately the red CFL bulb I tried was more FL and less C (the C is for 'compact', yes?), so the lid would not close with that in there, not without breaking the bulb against the floor of the lamp anyhow...  This one will get some orange felt glued on the bottom to save whatever furniture it ends up sitting on from getting scratched up.

 

Kang

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Edited by Kang
Replaced broken pic links with uploads...
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Posted (edited)

I finally built a proper molding bench over the weekend!  No more moving my belt sander and band saw off the workbench to make room for ramming up molds, and not nearly so much sweeping up afterwards if it works like it ought to!

 

I stole the idea to use half of a 55 gallon plastic drum for the sand bin from my pal Chirpy from "Chirpy's Tinkerings" on youtube, who I know by a different handle from an online forum for backyard metal casters; he has some very relaxing videos of his metal shaper in action and is trying to build an audience, if anyone else likes watching machine tools do their thing.  Also, some fun casting videos where he pours some molds for steam engine parts.  Dude knows a lot about different alloys and scary looking machine tools.

 

I got the plastic barrel from a guy in the neighbourhood who's selling them for some other guy who has a whole bunch to get rid of (got a couple nice metal ones too, not sure what I'll built with them - a burnout kiln for lost wax casting, sand storage, scrap metal storage, whatever - they're clean and have good seals)...  95% of the lumber used to be an old bed I stored for a friend for 15 years before he realized he was never gonna come get it back.  The blue styrofoam insulation is left over from making lost foam castng patterns, and as a gasket it seals down good enough to keep my sand fresh and the spiders out (I hope)... 

 

If it looks short for a workbench, that is because this is just part of the whole bench - the bin portion; I already have a platform to set it on.  Also, the 2X4's laying across the empty barrel is just where a board will sit on, and the molding flasks will sit on top of that board, and I'll have to reach over the sides of the flask to ram the sand up into place; so when a full flask is on top of that, the working height will be at least 6" above the 2X4's in the second pic than what you see here, and that is with a pretty short flask.  The idea is that I can just ram up molds without worrying about losing all my sand that gets bumped out of the flask by the ramming - it will simply fall back into the bin below.  It needs to sit a little low because otherwise it will be harder to lift the top half of the mold off the bottom. However I have not yet measured its height once it is in place out in my shed, hopefully I won't need to use a ladder!  :)  I doubt that will be the case, it should be fine if my vague and half-forgotten theoretical measurements are correct - a little taller than commercially available molding benches, but I'm a reasonably tall guy.

 

Edit - replaced photo-ducats links with uploaded pic...

 

Can't wait to ram up some molds on it!

Kang

 

PS.  The other half of the barrel is going to get made into some kind of raised garden planter box, so the bugs won't find our tomatoes so quick this year... hopefully.  - Mrs. Kang seems to be in "come up with yardwork projects for the huband" mode lately, which is good - it keeps me out of trouble and ensures I don't disappear into my +1 Workshop of Familial Neglect for entire weekends at a time.  Hey, I am not complaining, I like projects.  Besides, it's the least I can do for the woman who never gets mad at me when she comes home and finds me doing carpentry in the dining room...  Badly.  Again.    :)

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Edited by Kang
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Posted (edited)

Anyone else seeing all my pix here not working anymore?  From my end it appears photobucket finally decided to stop offering free external hosting for free account holders, effectively holding all my recent posted pix for ransom.  I probably should have seen this coming...  I will try to fix all my broken IMG tags as time permits.  :(

 

Kang

Edited by Kang

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28 minutes ago, Kang said:

Anyone else seeing all my pix here not working anymore?  From my end it appears photobucket finally decided to stop offering free external hosting for free account holders, effectively holding all my recent posted pix for ransom.  I probably should have seen this coming...  I will try to fix all my broken IMG tags as time permits.  :(

 

Kang

Yep, they are all gone.

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Thanks for confirming that.  I would "like" your post but I just can't make myself do it. :)

 

BUT... I just remembered I can upload pix here!  Not sure how I forgot that; got used to having to use external hosting on some other forums I guess.

 

Here's the first mold I rammed up on the new bench.  Just for practice, I won't be casting it yet, and I did not bother cutting any gating or a sprue.  I just wanted to see how the height of the bench works out in practice (works out great) and also figure out how to mold this moose antlers coat hook, which has an irregular parting line.  I had so use some more advanced molding techniques - a temporary "false cope" to act as a "follower" in order to mold the drag, then copious "coping down" to establish the parting line on the drag before ramming up the cope. (I said it before but do not expect people to memorize all the terminology - the cope is the top half of a sand mold, the drag is the bottom half.)

 

Kang

 

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Posted (edited)

I had a long weekend due to Canada Day, and it even held off on raining for part of it!

 

So I got out and cast those antlers...  

 

Video of the shakeout:

(youtube link removed - navigate via link in sig or search for "tobho mott youtube first shakeout on my new molding bench" if you are interested)

 

Kang

 

 

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Edited by Kang
removed youtube link
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Posted (edited)

Finished!  Flashing ground/filed off, screw holes drilled out, then I hit it with a wire brush drill bit to give a satin finish (edit - and to blend in the file marks from where I took off the flashing):

 

 

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edit - since taking this pic I got it to take on a darker, more lustrous shine by giving it a quick wipe with a paper towel and some 'Mothers Mag-Aluminum Polish'. 

Edited by Kang
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Posted (edited)

Tried to reproduce another iron casting in aluminum over the weekend.  A key hook shaped like dogs sitting on a fence, with their dangling tails being the hooks.  

 

The tails were a problem, since their parting line was not lying flat on the molding board like the rest of the 'pattern'.  There are a couple of ways to mold parts like this - "coping down", where you carve away the sand to accommodate the irregular parting line, is the simplest and normally the most appropriate for one-off castings like this.  I tried it, but it was hard to carve out the right parts of the sand in the tight spaces between the dogs tails and their butts.  So I use another method that is more suitable for casting several of a given part or for situations like this where coping down is too hard: I made some followers.  

 

Followers are loose pattern pieces that change the parting line to make it flat for easier molding.  You ram them up in the mold with the pattern, then remove them before making the other half of the mold.

 

I made them out of polymer clay, baked them, then carved and sanded them so they "followed" the parting line as closely as I could get them to, and gave it another try.  The followers worked really well - they totally were not the reason why the casting failed!   But I did get a nice casting of a candle holder out of the pour that I put in the same mold simply because there was room for it in the flask. (See attached pix)

 

Since I can't just dump a bunch of pix on photobucket to share on forums anymore, I dumped a bunch of video on YouTube instead.  That was more work but kind of fun, I may do it again some time.  The "movie" is in  4 parts, adding up to something a little less than an hour.  Which is longer than the subject of molding with followers really needs.  I tried to cut out or speed up the boring parts though, and really it is all covered in the first 2 parts...  But if seeing me totally screw up the mold out of sheer laziness followed by a little glowing hot crucible action footage sounds good, by all means feel free to skip ahead to parts 3 and 4.  :)

 

So, if anyone's interested in seeing how sand casting works (or sometimes doesn't), here's a search string to help find the youtube playlist I made of my attempts to cast these dogs: 'tobho mott youtube greensand molding using followers' - I think the URL I had posted here before might have been illegal, many apologies.  Channel is linked in sig also, at least for now.  

 

edit - I did some searching and it seems like youtube links are ok, with links preferred over embedded videos.  Spend some time today adding in links tha I'd avoided using or had removed after that discovery.  Here is a link to my "Greensand Molding Using Followers" youtube playlist:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVQuZmsu2c8&list=PLo6k_ZP-VFj4lIa_xNc7b3RrkijFD_HEa

 

Hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed making it!

 

Later on in the weekend, my daughter and I began painting some plaster of Paris boxes, I guess maybe they could be jewelry boxes(?), That I made as test patterns for molding and casting.  The one I'll eventually try to sand cast is made of hydrostone (just like the candle holder in the attached pix), for better chances of surviving getting rammed in a sand mold.  But I had cast a couple in PoP to practice when my molds first arrived, and they were just sitting around gathering dust until we started painting them with my old craft acrylics.  No pix of those yet but I'll post some when we finish them.  My son wanted to join us and work on one of my old minis (his 2nd ever) that he started painting a while back, but perhaps unsurprisingly, he had misplaced it.  By that time the kids had started fighting anyhow and would not stop when I warned them, so I had to take the paints away for a bit.  Such is life wih young children some days...  :)

 

Kang

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Edited by Kang
restored youtube link
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Posted (edited)

Took another shot at casting those dogs with the key hook tails over the weekend, this time with a plaster light switch cover plate pattern also in the mold.

 

One of the dogs did not fill, nor did part of the fence they are sitting on.  I think I made the gate into that dog's head a little too small.  Also, I should have maybe poured it a little hotter to get the very thin section of the cover plate to fill before freezIng off.  But other than not filling, it was the best mold of those dogs I've been able to pull so far.  No broken sand; I was so sure it would work!

 

There is video of the molding, melting, pouring, and the shakeout of the mold on my YouTube channel which is called Tobho Mott, if anyone is interested.  It is parts 5 and 6 of my "greensand molding using followers" playlist.  I embedded it above, then removed it, then restored it as just a the link.  Pretty sure I am within how the mods have said they'd like this sort of thing done based on a thread called "culling" in the KS subforum.  I have decided to start using YT more because of the ongoing photobucket ransom debacle, which has decimated this thread.   That is the reason why I am back in here now, editing the missing pix and links back into almost every post... 

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For non-foundry hobbyists, part 4 and 6 might be the most entertaining - red hot crucible and molten metal footage, plus the molds being shaken out.  The rest will be of interest too, if you want to learn about how sand molds for metal casting are made.

Edited by Kang
fixing links and pix
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Posted (edited)

If anyone is curious where all this cast aluminum comes from, I get it by recycling old car wheels.  They are (edit - almost) always made of cast aluminum alloy A356, a wonderful general purpose casting alloy with low shrink, good flow, etc.

 

But they're so big, how do I get them into my crucible, you may be asking.  

 

Well, I have to break them down first.

 

There are many ways to do this.  

 

Some backyard foundry guys toss them on a bonfire, wait for them to get crumbly (technical term: hot short), whack them into pieces, and drag the pieces out of the fire.  Some will melt, that gets retrieved out of the ashes later.  This creates a fair bit of dross (losses to oxidation) in my experience.

 

Some use a big log splitter, which I do not have access to.  Sounds fun though, and a little scary.

 

Some use power saws.  I don't think I have the right saw or blade for that, but I've used a reciprocating saw with a blade for metal demolition - that works, but it's a bit of a slog that leaves the hands numb for an hour afterwards.  That saw broke a couple weeks ago and I haven't had a chance to replace it (or maybe cast a new part and fix it?  Nah, it was a cheap one)

 

So I built a wood fired bath stack melter for scrapping wheels and other large aluminum scrap a couple years ago, which works very well.  It is a 55 gallon drum with no top or bottom which sits on a grate on a stand with a big bucket of water under it.  I put wood in the barrel up to the halfway point, then stack up to 3 wheels on top of that, then I light it from below.  An hour and change later, here's what is in the bucket:

 

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There is a ~15 minute video of it in action on my YouTube channel, Tobho Mott, if anyone thinks that might be fun to watch.  The sound the drips of molten aluminum make when they hit the water is really freaky, like Star Wars blaster sound effects sort of.  And there is even a steamy red hot firefly love scene part way through.  (Apparently they find my phone's camera light irresistible!).  My videos are pretty much all either backyard foundry stuff or weird creatures (mainly bugs).  This one has both!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHPOSQmfwmA

 

(edit - I forgot, I already posted a really short clip of this furnace in action early on in this thread.)

 

And when I cast my next bronze axe to chop down my giant parasitic wasp-infested dead tree, that will tie them all together.  I hope...

 

Kang

 

Edit - forgot to mention, the wood I used was most of the rest of the waste cuts from my friend's dead beetle killed ash tree.  So the only thing in this entire melting rig that I did not save from the landfill or a slow boat to china to get melted down and turned into cheap lawn chairs was the 1/2" bars the grate was made of.  The stand was made out of an old bed frame, and I got the barrels from a scrap yard.  Even the wheels themselves were no longer wanted by their former owners, who were all but desperate to have them disappear, since the cars they used to go on died with their winter tires and cheap steel rims on.  I really like the idea of making as much of my gear out of old junk as possible.

Edited by Kang
restored youtube video as link only
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Posted (edited)

Well, I took another shot at molding and casting the doggy key hooks and the light switch cover plate, using the little nuggets of cast aluminum I made in the previous post.  I managed to pull a decent sand mold of the dogs with only a little broken sand. Aceptable for a demo on using followers to mold iregular parting lines, I thought.  I kept the crucible in the hot furnace while skimming the dross this time after seeing that recommended by a youtuber and former expert molder for the US navy who goes by the handle Sandrammer, who has forgotten more about foundry work than most hobbyists will ever learn - this prevents the molten metal from losing too much heat during this process.  Since the last mold did not fill and I'm pretty sure hotter molten metal would have done the trick, this seemed like a great idea.  If you watched part 4 of my Greensand Molding Using Followers playlist, you might have noticed you can literally watch this heat loss happening - the crucible in the close-up shot goes from a bright red glow to no glow at all by the time I poured it.  I also put a stick under one end of the mold (the end with the cover plate) this time, since being poured "uphill" is supposed to help thin castings fill better.  I had such high hopes...  I think I will weld a longer handle on my dross skimmer so I can do the skim with the furnace still running.

 

Sadly, this time when I shook out the mold, I was once again one dog short.  A different dog this time, which seems strange, but he was missing no matter how you look at it.  The dog next to the missing one had a too short tail also.  It's the puppy who isn't on the left and the missing far end of the fence he isn't sitting on that did not fill. The part that did fill looks pretty good at least...

 

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The light switch cover was SOOO close to filling, I can't believe it failed again...  Eventually I'll probably mold a couple of those together with gating specially designed for these thin castings (a runner and gates on each side of the cover plate(s) rather than just on one side), instead of shoving them in the extra space in another mold; maybe that'll work.

 

IMG_20170731_212722527.jpg

 

I might be done with trying to cast those dogs, it was all only for molding practice anyhow, and it wasn't the mold that caused it to fail (well, maybe a different gating system could have helped...).  I can only take so much discouragement...  The up-side of it is, another youtuber named Worldtraveler commented on the last video that if I mail him the iron dogs, he'll cast one for me in bronze using lost wax ceramic shell casting, and he'll make a video of the process.  So I have reasons to stop trying to do it myself.  Worldtraveler goes by a different name on the backyard metal casting  forum I'm a member of, and he is the guy who started (and has kept going) a thread called 'YouTube "winners" of metal casting' (the "winners" is sarcastic, not so much to mock but to help newbies avoid making the same mistakles others have, not that you can tell by his tone sometimes.  Anyhow, he only has like 2 videos himself, so we were bugging him to make more videos himself if he's gonna judge others like that...  :)  So I am gonna try to get his address to mail it to him and hold him to that, should be fun to watch him show me how to do it "right".

 

I haven't posted my video yet, it'll be up tonight as part 7 of the playlist *(called "Greensand Molding Using Followers").  The final part, where I challenge WT to make good on his word and show us all how it's supposed to be done. :) All in good fun though, he's a subscriber to my channel (one of 8, not many but it has quadrupled in the past few weeks LOL) and although I joke about it sometimes, I am not actually worried about ending up in the "winners" thread or anything.  ...Although in part 6 I did have an oil line failure that perhaps should have won me a spot there...  Since I forgot to record the pour this time, I included footage I shot of La Machine here in Ottawa on Sunday night.  So there will be some giant robotic dragon action as well.  My furnace, Balerion the Black Dread, is named after a dragon... so that seemed to make sense while I was editing things.

 

I had hoped to have a successful casting for part 7, since I know a few guys who've watched the whole series and probably want closure like I do.  But I just don't have the heart to keep cracking away at the same molding job when I don't really even need the casting, I have other foundry projects lining up after all. (mainly: another bronze axe that I will need by late September for my annual "boys' weekend" camping trip.  Same trip I got hooked on molten metal during, back in 2013.)

 

edit - video now up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewRHjE4cjdo

 

Kang

Edited by Kang
added youtube video, link only
2 people like this

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