Lorathorn

To base, or not to base

40 posts in this topic

Bases are the best. I always base. Not only do they add stability and give you somewhere other than the figure to hold, they finish a piece of quite nicely. Now when I first started, I saw no reason to do anything but a basic base or none at all. Once you start, it's hard to stop tho. Happy basing!

That is sooooo true.

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Resurecting this thread ... :)

 

I might try to base my Bones witth consistant bases. Does anyone know if the round plastic RPG bases offered in the Reaper store are the same as the round plastic  bases you get through the Base Boss kickstarter?

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4 hours ago, Marc said:

Resurecting this thread ... :)

 

I might try to base my Bones witth consistant bases. Does anyone know if the round plastic RPG bases offered in the Reaper store are the same as the round plastic  bases you get through the Base Boss kickstarter?

I believe so.

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Not sure how useful this will be, but:

 

I like the plastic Reaper bases for metal miniatures. They're clean and low-profile, so they're pretty useful. But at least for human-sized Bones figures, I want significantly more weight for stability and reduced movement in whatever game I'm playing. I use fender washers for Bones figs even though I have many Reaper plastic bases.

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6 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

I like the plastic Reaper bases for metal miniatures. They're clean and low-profile, so they're pretty useful. But at least for human-sized Bones figures, I want significantly more weight for stability and reduced movement in whatever game I'm playing. I use fender washers for Bones figs even though I have many Reaper plastic bases.

I have a set of 1" round bases (74035) to which I epoxied 2 3/4" flat washers inside and a 1" fender washer at the bottom.  The washers inside both add additional weight and extra surface for the epoxy to adhere to.  I haven't actually used them for gaming yet but they seem like they should work fine.

 

Some of them do have gaps at the bottom between the washer and the base but I'm pretty certain this is my fault for trying to do all 20 in a single sitting and trying to get as many done as I could before the epoxy set.

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Posted (edited)

Ok, I've placed my first order here through the online store! In addition to a couple brushes, a dozen or so paints etc., I also ordered a few Bones, some Reaper super glue and a pack of the 1" RPG bases, so I'm all set to paint and base some Bones minis!

 

Regarding basing, how many cut the broccoli stands off first vs. leave it on and just glue the mini as is to the plastic stand?

 

Pros and cons of each?

 

For those that do cut off the broccoli stands before basing, how much does the reduced surface area for gluing (ie just the base of the mini's feet or whatever) affect the stability and strength of the mimi's bond to the base?

 

Thanks!!

Edited by Marc
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Since you asked...  ::D:  

 

I have some left over gift cards that I cut to fit inside the hollow of the 1" RPG bases.  I usually use two to get the integral base up to the top of the hollow.  Glue the plastic card bits and the integral base down with super glue, then I fill around the edges with whatever putty and bits I've got.  (Air dry only, I don't want to bake my Bones!)  The putty usually needs priming, then I paint as usual.  The advantage of this is that the base gets a tiny bit of extra weight for stability while the underside is nice and smooth and doesn't scratch my plexi-glass gaming surface.  

 

Lots of people just glue the integral base down to the flat side of the RPG bases, which is easier.  Depends on what look you prefer.  

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I've left the broccoli base on and taken it off, though I'm moving toward removal more as time passes. I'll note that the Bones figures have rather less broccoli and rather more sculpted base than the older metal figures. The sculpted bases are generally enough better looking than broccoli that I have less hesitancy to leave them on for appearance.

 

Integral Base

 

Pros: Easy. Gives you a bit more mass at the bottom of the figure, which can help keep it from falling over. Don't have to worry about how you're going to base the figure. Can be easier to attach to a painting handle for ease of painting.

 

Cons: Figure ends up standing on a hill, which can make tall figures even more awkward to use with older, smaller-scale figures. Broccoli is kind of ugly and if you know what to look for it will always show. There's really no chance to make the figure your own. Disguising the edges of the integral base can be tricky.

 

Integral Base Removed

 

Pros: Allows you to build a base for the figure that is fully customized. If done correctly, the figure can look like it's in rather than on top of the environment. Allows the use of bases that are smaller than the integral base in many cases. (For games that have hard restrictions on base sizes, this can be a real issue.

 

Cons: More of a pain to attach to both the painting base and the final base (more below). Removing the base risks damage to the sculpt. Figures can be less stable on the final base.

 

Basing after base removal

 

Pins through the bottom of the feet and into the base help a great deal, though they're less necessary for Bones figures. For Bones figures, I am now sculpting  and painting the base before painting the figure, which allows me to press the feet of the figure into the putty. Then, when the putty is set (and I sometimes use an oven on about 175 -- make sure the figure is not attached -- to speed this to completion), glue the figure in with super glue or 5-minute epoxy. For metal figures, I would strongly recommend pinning.

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On 10/26/2016 at 11:11 AM, DocPiske said:

Super glue works a bit too well for Bones. Next to impossible to remove the model after it dries. For metal minis, I use either PVA glue like Elmer's, or epoxy. If a model has no integrated base, I mush a small blob of green stuff on to the washer and then press the model into the blob. I remove the model and let the green stuff dry and then super glue the feet into the perfectly sized impressions.

A bit too well is right:( I was trying to get my grave wraith lined up under the washer hole to light it, and I was a little off:( Couldnt adjust it once it hit the super glue at all:( Guess i'll need another tea light and grave wraith:)

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On 6/29/2017 at 0:06 PM, Ratmaster2000 said:

A bit too well is right:( I was trying to get my grave wraith lined up under the washer hole to light it, and I was a little off:( Couldnt adjust it once it hit the super glue at all:( Guess i'll need another tea light and grave wraith:)

i hit something similar recently. blobbed on the glue, pressed it to the base and it shifted just a smidge as it settled. as soon as the mini touched the base, it was stuck. thankfully due to the pose it doesn't look weird.

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