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Archangelrey

What is this called? Complementary, analogous or triad?

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Hi everyone,

 

I was working on some tiles for a board games, and painted the tiles gray and dry brush from white on it. Someone suggest that I dry-brush some olive color over it. I did and I was surprised it make it look better. Why is that? And what is called to have a complete different color add depth to the another?

 

Also there one for desert stone and desert sand color?

 

Thanks,

 

Al

Edited by Archangelrey
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It's called realism.

 

Try finding an actual rock that is only two colors... (Like but not limited to, Grey/White) ...if ever you do: photograph it.

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It's called realism.

 

Try finding an actual rock that is only two colors... (Like but not limited to, Grey/White) ...if ever you do: photograph it.

 

 

Very helpful.  :mellow:  Is there a term, like Complementary, analogous or triad? Sorry never taking an art course so I don't understand the terms.

Edited by Archangelrey
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Sorry. Did not mean prior post to be a snarky answer. It was very literal.

 

What you did moved your painted terrain further toward reality.

 

With stones, and slate roofs, and hard pan desert it's not about any of those art school terms. The thing is to look closely and in detail at real stones and boulders. You will find that they are complex but subtle combinations of colors. Most people will see a boulder in nature and decide it is gray. Then they paint a scale model boulder gray. Then think, "that looks wrong" without knowing quite why.

 

Complex overlays and subtle interactions of different colors is what will help it look real.

 

Google image search is your friend. Here is one to get you started:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=decorative+boulders&tbm=isch

 

Another friend is the Power Palette paint finder:

https://www.reapermini.com/PowerPalette

 

Try uploading one of the boulder pictures or a desert picture and then picking different spots. It will help you see all the different colors present in what might look like a grey or tan rock pillar at first glance.

 

Maybe some of that will help?

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And realism is probably a good definition for what happened, as gray and white don't necessarily have a lot of color tone to work with or against.

 

Complementary colors are opposite each other on the color wheel (blue - orange, red - green, etc.).  These can be useful to add a shadow to a brighter color to increase the contrast.  Others can probably state this better than I can.  

 

Analogous colors are next to each other on the color wheel and have harmony within the group.

 

Triads, in the technical definition, are equidistant apart on the color wheel.  One of these colors should be the dominant color and the other two are then accents.  

*** NOTE *** This is not to be confused with Triads of Paint on the Reaper site.  Those are usually more a color group that work well together and are more analogous than triad, though I would imagine there is some color theory involved in the shade choices.

Edited by Grayfax
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 The thing about rocks is that the color of different types of stone is determined by how it's formed, and the different mineral content of them. Plus, even when they are almost solely composed of just one mineral, that mineral can have a variety of colors, and is often full of impurities...

 

Igneous rocks like granite or obsidian are formed by slow, even heat and pressure compacting various minerals together, They tend to appear to be one solid (often dark) color since they're generally made up of a mostly even distribution of minerals throughout. They don't often have a visible pattern although there may be striations.

When painting them, any minor color variations you do on them tend to be large splotches of a very thin colored wash or glaze. Patterns on the rocks are usually too fine to be seen at the scale we work with.

 

Sedimentary rocks like limestone or sandstone are formed by the dust and detritus picked up by flowing water being deposited in a location and becoming cemented together. They're pretty much basically dried mud. They can often have a greater number of different minerals in them than igneous rocks, resulting in a wider array of colors, and sometimes form in uneven layers leaving veins or spots in them if they're not a solid color.

Depending on the particular rock, they might be painted a solid color or given some light stippling. Larger areas like a cliff-side, riverbank or canyon wall may have horizontal layers of different colors.

 

Metamorphic rocks are formed from pre-existing rocks of any type that have been physically or chemically changed by outside forces such as extreme heat and pressure, and include things like marble or slate. The patterns vary wildly from chaotic layers of whorls to a fine, even grain depending on the starting rock and the manner in which the transformative forces affected it.

Painting techniques vary by rock - stippling, layers, veins, etc. There are several good tutorials for painting marble floating around online, and at least one relatively recent one here on the forum.

 

As mentioned above, most minerals are rarely ever found in a true neutral gray color - they almost always have at least undertones of some other color.

Generally...

 

Things like granite or slate ("grey" rocks), tend towards blue, although you also find some stones that are blue-green, grey-green or have a hint of beige to them...

 

Desert rocks such as sandstone or limestone ("tan" rocks) could have undertones of yellow, orange, red or green.

 

Most crystalline minerals that aren't actually transparent are still semi-translucent due to their structure, so although they can appear in almost any color, they generally tend toward pale or pastel shades for base coats, with stark white edge highlights.

 

 

Anytime you have rocks on your base or you're doing terrain, take the particular environment of the scene into account when figuring out what type of stone you want to paint it as, and then do an image search for pictures of it to use as reference.

Edited by Mad Jack
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Sorry. Did not mean prior post to be a snarky answer. It was very literal.

 

What you did moved your painted terrain further toward reality.

 

With stones, and slate roofs, and hard pan desert it's not about any of those art school terms. The thing is to look closely and in detail at real stones and boulders. You will find that they are complex but subtle combinations of colors. Most people will see a boulder in nature and decide it is gray. Then they paint a scale model boulder gray. Then think, "that looks wrong" without knowing quite why.

 

Complex overlays and subtle interactions of different colors is what will help it look real.

 

Google image search is your friend. Here is one to get you started:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=decorative+boulders&tbm=isch

 

Another friend is the Power Palette paint finder:

https://www.reapermini.com/PowerPalette

 

Try uploading one of the boulder pictures or a desert picture and then picking different spots. It will help you see all the different colors present in what might look like a grey or tan rock pillar at first glance.

 

Maybe some of that will help?

 

Thank you, I apologize as well for the respond. 

 

 

Wow, thank everyone for the help. This is extremely helpful for me.

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The more I paint and the deeper down the painting rabbit hole I go, the less I am using colors along the white - grey - black scale.  I've found myself shading with darker colors appropriate to what I'm painting and mixing colors to get a blue-grey or a green-grey or a tan.  I guess that's all part of the experimenting process.  

 

Enjoy your journey down the rabbit hole.  

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The more I paint and the deeper down the painting rabbit hole I go, the less I am using colors along the white - grey - black scale.  I've found myself shading with darker colors appropriate to what I'm painting and mixing colors to get a blue-grey or a green-grey or a tan.  I guess that's all part of the experimenting process.  

 

Enjoy your journey down the rabbit hole.  

 

Yea, the journey is fun. I just finishing up my DF terrain and was work with a base grey and a earth stone for a starting color, and last night I add a dry brush of Nurgleg Green. Tonight going to top it with a light dry brushing of  wrack white, I think that the name. It first time I have dry brushed so much. But I still haven't gotten use to layering 

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