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I use Vallejo Fluros and mix them into the paints I am using.. but I've also just used some Fluro craft paint..  

 

Reaper Clears work great.. I also use vallejo transparent orange 

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Some of the HD colors are pretty bright and well pigmented.  

 

In the core series, phoenix red, fire orange, jade green, moth green, and fresh blood are all vivid. 

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Moth Green is my absolute favourite paint that Reaper makes. I'm considering buying some backup bottles just to be on the safe side. I would also highly recommend Spectral Glow. It's gorgeous and versatile.

 

If you're looking at other lines, then I would very highly recommend Warcolours. Their paints are super vibrant and very well pigmented. Their consistency is a bit different from Reaper's and they tend toward being more transparent, but that's a really good thing if what you're looking for is to change the tone of things with an effect like OSL. They also have fluorescent paints, which I prefer using over the Vallejo fluorescents (I have both,) mostly based on the consistency of them.

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Thanks all very helpful
 

Moth Green is my absolute favourite paint that Reaper makes. I'm considering buying some backup bottles just to be on the safe side. I would also highly recommend Spectral Glow. It's gorgeous and versatile.

If you're looking at other lines, then I would very highly recommend Warcolours. Their paints are super vibrant and very well pigmented. Their consistency is a bit different from Reaper's and they tend toward being more transparent, but that's a really good thing if what you're looking for is to change the tone of things with an effect like OSL. They also have fluorescent paints, which I prefer using over the Vallejo fluorescents (I have both,) mostly based on the consistency of them.


War colors! Hmmm i have been wanting to try them out too! I'm not a fan Vallejo paints. EVERY single bottle i have purchased over the years has clouded up. I have never had that issue from Reaper. I would say 99.7% of all my paints are reaper. 

 

Is there a company that has a box set of neons/brights/clears?

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<snip>

I'm not a fan Vallejo paints. EVERY single bottle i have purchased over the years has clouded up. I have never had that issue from Reaper. I would say 99.7% of all my paints are reaper. 

What do you mean by "clouded up"?

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<snip>

I'm not a fan Vallejo paints. EVERY single bottle i have purchased over the years has clouded up. I have never had that issue from Reaper. I would say 99.7% of all my paints are reaper. 

What do you mean by "clouded up"?

 

I am curious as well.  While none of my paints are more than three years old, I have yet to see any behavior I would describe as "clouded."

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If you're looking at other lines, then I would very highly recommend Warcolours. Their paints are super vibrant and very well pigmented. Their consistency is a bit different from Reaper's and they tend toward being more transparent, but that's a really good thing if what you're looking for is to change the tone of things with an effect like OSL. They also have fluorescent paints, which I prefer using over the Vallejo fluorescents (I have both,) mostly based on the consistency of them.

 

I'll mention Golden Fluid Acrylics (Pingo's favorites), which are about the same viscosity as most minis paints. In particular, the single pigment colors like Dioxazine Purple, Cobalt Blue, Quinacridone Red, Permanent Green, Primary Yellow, ....

 

Disadvantage is that you'll need to dull coat them when you're done, as they're semi-gloss. But they're quite saturated.

 

Watch out for fluorescents, as they tend to be evanescent, especially when exposed to UV.

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The Neon Colors triad is great. Punk Rock Pink is one of my favorite bright colors. It has a slight magenta/purplish hue to it, and I've used it as a highlight color in gems and crystals. LED Blue is also a great teal-ish highlight color. Neon Yellow is a bit iffy, as it has a greenish cast when compared with most other yellows; I haven't used it much, as I prefer using Moth Green for a bright acidic highlight.

 

Consider also the Pastel Colors Triad.

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I'm not sure about the neon colors but I have all the clears and they're outstanding for punching-up their respective color. If you paint a red cloak (for example) and the color isn't as bright as you want it, add a clear red glaze or two and it'll help saturate the red. I have also used inks for that, but they're usually glossy. You can also mix clears into other colors to increase the normal color's saturation and slightly increase it's transparency. Never tried them for OSL effects.

 

+1 for the pastel colors triad, especially Mint Green.

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<snip>

I'm not a fan Vallejo paints. EVERY single bottle i have purchased over the years has clouded up. I have never had that issue from Reaper. I would say 99.7% of all my paints are reaper. 

What do you mean by "clouded up"?

I am curious as well.  While none of my paints are more than three years old, I have yet to see any behavior I would describe as "clouded."

 

Paint on my wet palette after sitting for about a minute gets cloudy white on top and I have to remix it. Now I'm use to doing it but I switched to reaper and that paint never does it. And believe me when I tell you I shake the crud out all of my paints. 

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I'm not going to suggest colours, because while a bright saturated colour can be an important component when you're painting OSL, it's not the key component. The key component is... light! What I mean is, your light source needs to be the lightest value thing on your figure (probably the only item that uses pure white), and the areas that are reflecting light from it need to have much brighter highlights and not nearly as dark of shadows as the areas that are not receiving light from the light source. You can get that right using black & white (or taking a picture of a figure in B&W to test) and still convey a light effect with no colour at all.

 

Colour-wise, what is as helpful or more helpful as using bright saturated colours in your light colour is to use duller and less saturated colours elsewhere. What I mean is, if your wizard is wearing navy robes or dull blue robes rather than bright robin's egg blue robes, the bright green or orange spell effect will look even brighter. 

I type a bit more about it here, and have a link to two example figures I've done. The left one was my first attempt at OSL. The highlights are no where near bright enough, shadows away from the light aren't dark enough, and the colours of the figure's clothes are too close to the light colour. On the one on the right, I used much duller colours on the clothes as well as a brighter colour for the light, and I did a lot more highlighting close to the light, and darker shadows away from it. This could be pushed even further than what I've done on that figure, mine is meant to be a character with a spell effect in decent lighting, someone in a dark dungeon would have way more shadows than what I painted.

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/50088-osl-help-andor-comments/?p=735197
 

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As Wren says, OSL is more about controlling values and saturation than using a brighter paint. And getting convincing OSL in a generically sunlit style mini is going to be hard, because it has to be a really intense light to cancel out the power of sunlight. You can usually get the best results with a lower secondary light source that can show in the shadows of the primary light source.

 

And also as Wren say (:)) doing OSL in a dark environment is much more dramatic. When I painted the Oathsworn mage, I used both value and saturation to give the illusion of lights (and also color contrast and some of the shadow lighting I mentioned). Also remember your material properties, metal is going to reflect the light stronger, wood is going to absorb it, etc.

 

https://cashwiley.com/2016/08/06/oathsworn-female-human-mage/

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