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  I was in my local Dollar Tree over the weekend, and noticed they too had jumped on the Fairy Garden bandwagon.  

  The have an assortment of blister-carded figures, of which this set of mushrooms seemed the most useful.  There was also an assortment of poorly sculpted fairies, and another assortment of cartoonish animals.

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They also have a selection of buildings, like the twig and leaf gazebo above, and those shown below.  As is typical, they are a little soft on detail, but may be spruced up a bit with paint.  I may go back and get one of those mushroom houses to see if I can improve it a bit with a proper paint job.

 

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They also had an assortment of artificial succulents that would make good judge foliage.

 

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COOL STUFF! There are some FINE  Little Treasures in there. For Folk like me who make our own scenery, creations like these are wonderful sources of ideas & inspiration. GREAT FIND!

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Sigh.

 

Now I have a stop to make on the way home.

 

Good find.

 

 There's a Dollar Tree in the shopping centers down the hill from the Citadel, at the opposite end of the parking lot from the Goodwill Store... I didn't see any of that stuff in there the last time I was there, though.

 

 Those mushrooms are cool.

The mushroom house might work, and I like the Dire Gazebo In Sheep's Clothing (lol), although I find that the more fantastical something is supposed to be the easier it is to ignore things like sloppy details, so I'm not sure the regular house could be cleaned up enough to make them look decent...

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Michael's currently has a crapton of new mushroom houses and similars, akin to the stuff Joann has been carrying the past year, but now in larger amounts.

(NOTE: myself and others have posted about those before, but I mean to say that they have an even larger selection now than the last time we posted about it.)

 

None of it is a mere dollar, alas.

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Good find!

 

I'll have to figure out if I have one of those stores nearby and check it out.

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I had time to throw some paint on these last night and this morning, and wanted to post the results.
 
For the twig and leaf gazebo, I first snapped the wings off the butterfly on the roof, nd filed the remains down a little to help blend the shape into the leaf beneath.  I then painted over it with a close match for the leaf green, and gave it a wash with some Agrax Earthshade.  I then drybrushed the leaf roof with a light green, and then drybrushed the wood structure with a tan.  Next, I painted the vines running around the door, and the floor at the top, with a verdigris color, and then did some bronze drybrushing on it.  After that, I painted the stones leading into the doorway with a dark gray, washed them with a little of the Agrax Earthdshade, and then drybrushed some highlights with a light grey.  Lastly, I flocked the base.

 

I think it makes a nice little woodland temple.

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With the mushrooms I simply gave the stems a wash with the Agrax Earthsahde, and then when dry, drybrushed them with an off-white.  I then touched up some of the sloppy painting on the mushroom caps (though I see I didn't get all of it.)   And then I flocked their bases.

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LOOKIN' GOOD! The Mushrooms even have gills...nice bit of detail. The pieces painted/flocked up SO SPLENDIDLY that now the fairy wings I picked up are calling to me to make some Goblin Faeries. WELL DONE!

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LOOKIN' GOOD! The Mushrooms even have gills...nice bit of detail. The pieces painted/flocked up SO SPLENDIDLY that now the fairy wings I picked up are calling to me to make some Goblin Faeries. WELL DONE!

 

 

Thank you, malefactus!    I think goblin fairies are a great idea! And I can't even imagine what wonderful insanity you will come up with for them.  :)  I'm happy to help inspire. 

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