Pineapple

Pineapple's WIP #1: Olaf, Viking Chieftain 03240

30 posts in this topic

Hi all, welcome to My First Post!  Population: Us.

 

The last time I painted miniatures I was probably about 12, which for those of us keeping score was 20 years ago.  I pulled them out recently since my friends and I are getting back into D&D.  They're the plastic miniatures that came with the game Hero Quest, and honestly, I'd say they weren't half bad for a 12 year old borrowing colors out of his dad's model airplane paints.  (I basically just painted solid colors, no washes, no highlights, no thinning, etc.)

 

That said, I've done a lot of reading the past few weeks and repainted a few of them for practice with some basic to intermediate techniques that were completely unknown to preteen me.  Now that I've got a little comfort with the brush, I'm diving into my first real test project: Olaf, Viking Chieftain.  I picked him for the following Very Important Reasons (TM).

 

1) I got him cheap along with a few other minis to paint in an eBay auction.

2) He won't be representing any of the PCs in our game, so how he ends up looking is of little consequence.  He'll be a good low-stakes learning project, but one where I like the sculpt and will be motivated to do a good job.

3) He arrived primed, which makes it easier to get started what with temperatures well below the recommended range for spray painting right now.

 

Before I actually dive in, here he is:

DSCF1272.thumb.jpg.4e5c49977955dbd1b1dae0969388d41b.jpg

 

DSCF1271.thumb.jpg.d9e2fa31f4f5a16ca178b3392c05f181.jpg

 

And here are my first questions:

1) There are a few spots where the primer has chipped off during shipping.  (At least, I assume that's what happened.)  Do I need to strip it and start over?  Can I just lightly brush paint some black onto those spots?

2) His axe will need to be bent back into place.  From what I understand, some hot water and patience can help make that happen.  Should I worry about the primer on the shaft of his axe cracking or wrinkling or anything like that?  If so, what should I do about it?

3) Any picture taking tips?  My wife has a digital camera with a macro feature and a "super macro" feature.  Super macro disables the flash and the lighting in our house isn't great at night, so these pics were taken with the regular macro and flash.  (Right now this is less about my vanity and more about getting the best quality pics to post so that I can get the best constructive feedback I can.)

 

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Posted (edited)

On 3/12/2017 at 8:47 PM, Pineapple said:

And here are my first questions:

1) There are a few spots where the primer has chipped off during shipping.  (At least, I assume that's what happened.)  Do I need to strip it and start over?  Can I just lightly brush paint some black onto those spots?

 

Edit: oops, I didn't think I actually posted. Am not good at forums. And now everybody answered all the questions.

Edited by Pragma
am not smart.

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Posted (edited)

Welcome to the forums Pineapple. 

 

Olaf is a metal mini. The boiling business is for straightening plastic minis. Boiling might help get rid of the primer but will do nothing to straighten metal. 

 

To straighten out his axe: just carefully bend it back to straight at room temperature. It may be helpful to use wooden tools like craft sticks or pieces of balsa wood. It is softer than the metal (won't mar it) but harder than your fingers (saves a little pain). Above don't use steel  pliers (like needle nosed) to bend with. Those will at least scratch the primer if not mar the metal. 

 

There is such a thing as brush on primer you might look into if the paint gets nicked. 

Edited by TGP
Removed doubled word
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Posted (edited)

Welcome to the Forum.

Browse around and look at the Painting Advice Thread for all sorts of tips and hints.

I also recommend watching Youtube videos, just search for Fantasy Miniature Painting and you will see a lot of useful clips.

 

Metal mini, like TGP mentioned, carefully bend it. ( if it breaks you will need to glue it on again)

Since you're talking about Temperatures affecting spray primer, invest in some Brush on Primer.

 

For tips and hints about making better pics.

There is a thread called Shutterbug on the Forum, many useful tips there.

 

You mentioned the mini is already primed, is this done with primer or is it just a layer of black paint?

I ask because primer is less likely to chip off then paint.

 

Should you notice that it is paint, I recommend stripping it.

 

I for one like to see how you will paint this guy.

 

HAVE FUN!

 

 

 

Edited by Xherman1964
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Welcome to the forums! ^_^

 

I only use brush on primer so I know little of spray primers.....but that black looks awfully shiny to my eye. Is it just me or is it also dusty? I don't think I'd try to paint over that. Looks like frustration city. Either way, the primer really shouldn't be chipping off (of course, if you're really rough with it or it was rattling around with other metal, then that can happen) but if some of it is, I would worry about the longevity of the rest of it. I don't know....it looks like a strip job to me.

 

I'm not going to repeat what has already been said above me, but be aware that when you're bending a metal mini part, you will almost certainly hear a crackling noise, so just know that's normal. It can be a nerve-wracking sound if you're not used to it. You want to avoid doing any kind of twisting motion as twisting will increase the likelihood of snapping it in half. I do recommend stripping this guy, but if you choose not to, then I think it's really just going to depend on what primer was used as to whether any damage is going to occur when you bend the metal.

 

If you do choose to leave the primer on, Reaper makes a good black brush on primer that you can touch up any spots with.

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I think from looking at the pictures that its black paint and not black primer. I would probably go ahead and strip it off and start over. There is not point in taking a potential step backward and upping the frustration level trying to work with an improperly prepped mini.

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I'd strip it. Even if it is black primer, which I suspect it isn't, if you try to just fix the chips, you'll get weird spots that aren't level with the rest. A dip in some purple power or simple green for a few hours should strip that off just fine. Give it a good scrubbing with a toothbrush to get in the nooks and crannies, clean it again with some soap and hot water, a thorough rinse and you'll good to go. Like Heisler said, better to start with a well prepped mini than get frustrated later on.

 

As far as pics go, try taking them against a dark gray or black background. That usually helps. The pic you took looks pretty good already. Like Xherman said, check out Shutterbug for more info. 

 

Ask lots of questions, you'll find tons of helpful, encouraging Forumites on here. 

 

Welcome to the forums and back to the hobby! 

Most importantly, if you're having fun you're doing it right! 

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Thanks everybody!

 

I'm not sure whether it's primer or paint, but on closer inspection I found a couple small patches that the original owner missed in the spray (places like up under the shield and scabbard for example, so I'm going to go ahead and strip and re-prime as recommended. 

 

Purple power and brush on primer should arrive Wednesday provided snow doesn't hamper shipping too badly, so I'll check back then. 

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Welcome to the Asylum . . . errr . . . Forums!

 

I don't really have much to add that others haven't already stated, other than to say that I too use only brush on primer for a variety of reasons.  In addition to Reaper, there is also Vallejo which makes a pretty good brush on primer that you can get in a variety of colors.  I do tend to find that I occasionally need to go back over the mini with more primer as the primer tends to shrink as it dries, but I have never noticed any problems resulting from this (of course I am also very new to painting as well so what may not seem like a problem in the end result to me, might seem like one to somebody more experienced).  The other thing I will tell you is to use an old (or cheap) brush for priming as you'll likely need to dab it into some of the tight areas and that can be really brutal on a brush.  No sense wrecking an expensive brush doing that.  A cheap synthetic will work just fine.  My primer brush currently would be absolutely useless for just about anything else (except maybe dry brushing) but works just fine as a primer brush.  Its also a good way to add some longevity to your brushes.

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Welcome to our Asylum away from Home!

 

As others have covered mush of what I would say, I won't go over it again...

 

When stripping figures with deep spots like the fur on this guy appears to be, after using a stiff bristled tooth brush, a straight pin is useful for cleaning out the deep spots that the toothbrush wont reach.

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That is a tool I made for doing that.

It is basically a straight pin that I cut the head from, and then, CAREFULLY with a pair of pliers, put into an old hairless paint brush handle.

 

A Dremel tool with a soft wire brush at low speed can be useful as well.

Search the Painting tips section for threads on stripping paint.

 

But I will repeat the first lave of mini painting:

If you are having fun, you are doing it right!

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Posted (edited)

Hmmmmmm, if it were me, I'd not want to start out with something as annoying as stripping a mini.  Furthermore, cleaning that guy up won't really give you the sense of accomplishment that painting a mini would. 

 

Secondly, I'd advise only painting minis you like, even if you feel like you need a lot of practice.  It's a hobby after all.

 

If you need some very cheap minis to start on, you could get a box of vikings, knights, Greeks, Romans or barbarians from one of the people making historical plastic minis for pretty cheap.  Also, the Frostgrave soldier boxe would make a good set of mercenaries or henchmen for a fantasy RPG.  

 

Just a thought.  Or maybe I just really hate stripping mins.

Edited by lowlylowlycook
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It's a metal mini, right?

 

Put it in a jar, pour acetone over it. leave it be a few days.

Then rinse and then toothbrush.

 

Should be ok then.

 

Be careful with the stuff though..

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Oh, I'm not bothered by stripping minis.  Olaf is currently enjoying the ceremonial Viking dip in a vat of caustic purple liquid before being scrubbed with The Toothbrush of Odin.

 

And I hope I didn't give the wrong impression - I think Olaf is a cool mini with a ton of nice sculpting work.  He's just easy to use as a practice piece because he isn't directly tied to any campaign.

 

Once he's all clean, rinsed, I double check for mold lines and such, I decided I'll prime him gray because that seems easier to paint blonde hair and an arctic wolf pelt over.  Thanks again!

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I finally had some time this week to devote to Olaf, so here's where he currently stands. I decided to go with grey primer because he has a mix of things going on here.  The armor and weapons will be fairly dark obviously, but his complexion and hair will be pretty light, as will the wolf pelt.  I'm going for a nice winter wolf pelt.

 

I've seen a few people recommend starting with the eyes, so I did that and then followed up with the face and hands while I was at it because leaving the eyes in a rough state just didn't sit well with me.  Then the metal armor that peeks out in places was another relatively close to the body spot, so I hit those, and then had to stop for tonight.  It's just a base coat right now, no shading or highlighting.

 

The eyes are just Vallejo 70.951 White and 70.950 Black.  The skin is about a 50/50 mix of 70.847 Dark Sand and 70.860 Medium Fleshtone, and the armor is 70.863 Gunmetal Grey.

 

58d33349501ae_Olaf1r3.jpg.5243a4117c39f25275037de28c630bfc.jpg

 

58d3334b08a85_Olaf2r2.jpg.3584d0ef223dc7855285b2d70a0f3eef.jpg

 

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Nice start so far!

 

Possible option is to take a dark paint like umber or Army Painter dark shade (not the dip) & do a wash over the mini. It'll bring out the details & such. It'll help when you do detailing later. Tre's minis look fantastic just with primer & a dark shade applied to them. I have his female half-orc fighter & I've yet to put any paint on her due to I love how the shading work came out. :lol: 

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