Kengar

Best dremel bit(s)?

7 posts in this topic

I have a fairly scattered assortment of dremel attachments, but I was wondering what the hive mind thought were the best ones for dealing with mold lines on pewter or Bones? Though frankly, I think the X-Acto is better for the latter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have yet to find a good Dremel solution for Bones. For them I scrape with a very sharp scalpel.  For metal, I use carbide cutting tips for initial line removal and major modifications, followed by a diamond burr for smoothing, and a rubber polishing point for polishing and fine adjustment. Often I skip the diamond burr and just use light pressure with the carbide, YMMV.

 

It is important that you spend the extra and get carbide.  Steel wears out and gets dull very fast.  Carbide will last you many years (some of mine are approaching 20 years old and still sharp).  These have really come down in price; you can now buy a whole set for what I paid for a single bit back in the 1990s.

 

Here's my set, you can find it on Amazon and MicroMark:

 

Spoiler

20Pcs-1-8-Inch-3mm-Tungsten-font-b-Carbi

 

 

Diamond Burrs:

 

Spoiler

Free-Shipping-1-8-Inch-3-17mm-Shank-Rota

 

 

Rubber Polishing Points:

 

Spoiler

61O+rGvjC8L._SX355_.jpg

7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got a standard set of dremel bits, the ones for metal and masonry - only for metal minis. Bones I only use an exacto (though many have mentioned using scalpels, I've just not gotten around to getting one)

 

also, second micromark tools, they're awesome stuff.

 

I would caution you to avoid the cheaper sets on Amazon, just because the one or two I've gotten that way (usually drill bits) are not as good a quality. You really do get what you pay for in some things.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a battery powered pen engraver (much smaller than a Dremel) with a small spherical diamond burr with good success.

 

It would dig a bit in the surface, but I could smooth it out so that it looked natural. Much easier on larger pieces where a knife cut would look to artificial. Though be ready for a fine cloud of Bones shavings as you use it. Luckily it's easy to vacuum up.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use only an x-acto pen style knife and needle files.  The files aren't very effective usually, but if followed up with the knife they can help.  Normal sandpaper or buffing bits just don't do much to the flexible bonesium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As part of the rubber polishing series talespinner mentioned, Dremel also makes a pointier version that has a shape very similar to a pointy polishing stick.  If you have a tool that can keep you at no more than 5000rpm, and preferably slower, it works great for taking mold lines off of Bones.  Just slide the bit down the line and watch it peel the line right off the mini.  The nice thing about the polishing bits is that they aren't very aggressive at low rpms, so if you bump a bit of detail it will not immediately remove it.

 

TBH, I long ago reached the point where I don't really care about Bones mold lines and quit removing them.  Now the polishing bit allows me to take the worst off quickly, so I do a small bit of prep work, but YMMV.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

This is what I use for hard plastic and the few bones I do....

Micro Mark Scraper thread

 

get one!

 

Edited by knarthex
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now