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Matbar

3D printed minis

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So I took a commission to paint some minis for a tabletop game.  I didn't even think to ask what material they were made from.  I get them, and they're 3D printed.  Have any of you primed and painted this stuff?  It's fairly high quality for 3D printing, but there are extremely slight striations.  I am hoping that primer will smooth it out, but now I'm concerned with how the primer will react to this material.  I have already seen what happens to the GW plastic when someone else applied the spray primer too close, so I'm thinking the safest thing might be brush on.

 

Any advice or help would be great.

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So far with heroforge minis we've had luck with brush on primer and direct Reaper painting

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As Ludo says, HeroForge makes 3D printed unpainted miniatures, so you can paint their miniatures. I'd guess it depends on the plastic. Brush-on primer is a safe bet.

 

For the striations, you may need to sand them down, and/or use plastic putty, I guess.

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or you can airbrush prime them if you have one...

 

just don't lick the airbrush....

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If this is anything like Heroforge's "Strong Plastic" stuff, this guy provides a guide on how to deal with the rough texture of it.

 

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Smoth-on has a resin formulated specifically for smoothing prints, but I would assume that any resin or similar should fill in the grooves.

Then it's a bit of careful work with sanding sticks, or even wet-sanding sandpaper of gradually finer quality.

I've only painted PLA-based prints, but on that stuff you can use just about any primer.

(Not a clue what Heroforge uses, though)

 

 

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I have had success with Reaper's brush on sealer on 3-d prints.  Usually takes 2-3 coats but I have gone as high as 5 with some bad ones. 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Matbar said:

So I took a commission to paint some minis for a tabletop game.  I didn't even think to ask what material they were made from.  I get them, and they're 3D printed.  Have any of you primed and painted this stuff?  It's fairly high quality for 3D printing, but there are extremely slight striations.  I am hoping that primer will smooth it out, but now I'm concerned with how the primer will react to this material.  I have already seen what happens to the GW plastic when someone else applied the spray primer too close, so I'm thinking the safest thing might be brush on.

 

Any advice or help would be great.

 

One of my regular customers sends me Hero Forge exclusively.  I've spray primed every piece, and there has never been a problem with it affecting the material, and the paint always adheres without issue.  Frankly, I don't think the 3d printed stuff is worth the price people are paying, but what do I know - I just get paid to paint the stuff.

 

The Egg 

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46 minutes ago, Egg of Coot said:

Frankly, I don't think the 3d printed stuff is worth the price people are paying, but what do I know - I just get paid to paint the stuff.

I'm kind of surprised that it's done exclusively. I find Heroforge a swell idea but still needing work in execution.. A lot of the poses end up warping the parts to the point they look terrible, and there so often ends up presenting parts "bleeding" into one another.

I see Heroforge as a final recourse when nothing else can be found... But even then, they still lack proper clerical robes to make my evil death cleric with a plague doctor's mask character. <_<

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34 minutes ago, BlazingTornado said:

I'm kind of surprised that it's done exclusively. I find Heroforge a swell idea but still needing work in execution.. A lot of the poses end up warping the parts to the point they look terrible, and there so often ends up presenting parts "bleeding" into one another.

I see Heroforge as a final recourse when nothing else can be found... But even then, they still lack proper clerical robes to make my evil death cleric with a plague doctor's mask character. <_<

 

I'm inclined to agree. Until 3D printers become cheap and reliable to the point of "every home has one," I'm durned if I'll buy one strictly for miniatures. I have yet to be hugely impressed with any of the 3D printed items I've seen, in comparison to the drab old "sculpted and molded" stuff I've been working with all my life.

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Thanks all, I'm feeling much less nervous about the material now.  The ones I have simply refuse to photograph with my cell phone and low photography skills, but they are considerably better quality than what was in that video.  That guy is genius, because the mini he had was awful!  I think these may be Hero Forge, but they're black and the lines are almost invisible until you put on a visor.  I've got several kinds of primer, but the brush on seems better at filling small imperfections.  The spray-on I have is for doing the husband's GW minis and it's made specifically to bond with the plastic.

 

Knarthex, I don't have an airbrush, so we're safe there, but I thought you might find this amusing.  The other day my son caught me licking a brush and he was completely indignant.  He yelled "UGH MOM!  TASTE THE WEASEL?  EWWW"

 

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The new Hero Forge plastic is something else--I think Pinky Madigan painted one up a few months back.  I did a couple on a lark, and I was reasonably impressed--I mean, they're still not to the Bones/GW/Wyrd level, but the quality is definitely improving.  The minis are still not painted, but such is life.

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I have a couple of 3D printed minis that I printed on my cheapo Flashforge Finder, and find they work out OK. the printlines and stepping are there, but are not very noticable exept in closeups, or if you wash or drybrush them which bring out all those little lines something terrible. I find acrylic primers (both spray and brush on) work fine with the PLA plastic.

 

170416-3d-print-gorilla-a.jpg170416-3d-print-gorilla-b.jpg170416-3d-print-gorilla-c.jpg

 

this model of an ape if from a free pack of critters downloaded from drivethrurpg

30mm base

 

 

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Very late to the thread here, but I designed, printed, painted and entered-into-ReaperCon a CAV-ish figure. I primed it with artist gesso specifically for the gap filling qualities. Now, that meant a bit of sanding, and I had many flat surfaces that took to this technique fairly well. Just tossing that out there. Much harder to do on a more traditional figure, but could help in places like swords and shields. 

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