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Imbrian Arts (Jody Siegel), Kickstarter 22nd April

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I remember that the first Imbrian Arts KS had a lot of issues and delays, but I don't know whether it was eventually sorted out or not so if any previous backers have any info it would be worth speaking up.

 

The minis look good though

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He's had a lot of issues but to their credit they asked backers about this before doing it

 

With these upcoming releases we'd like to do something different than just putting them up online. Unlike metal miniatures, releasing just a single figure for the resin collection requires a much larger cost per model due to the resin material, packaging, and extra items that come with it which means we have to release those figures in limited numbers and wait for them to sell before releasing the next one.  In our kick starter the resin orders were very small and not enough to warrant a full release. But since most people now prefer the resin sets over metal we'd like to do a full run of 100+ copies. We'd also like to release everything that's been sent for casting all at once since currently Jody is sculpting faster than we are releasing figures but we can't do both at the same time.

project video thumbnail
 PLAY

What we'd like to do now is use KickStarter for all of our upcoming resin releases. Releasing figures in groups instead of one at a time will allow us to complete this project faster. In addition, it will allow us to reach a much larger audience than if we just released models online as normal. This means we can also do full runs. These "mini" campaigns will be short and not interfere with the completion of this campaign or jody's sculpting and any backers whose pledge from this campaign would be ready to ship will have their models shipped early whenever possible using the master resin copies or sample castings sent by the caster. Ideally it would be nice to not have to use kickstarter and thus be giving a portion of our funds to away, but as many other businesses and sculptors have found, customers are now using KS as a primary means to find out about new releases. Kickstarter has changed the market so much that when people see a photo online they assume we're going to run a campaign instead of asking when it will be available to purchase online or are unaware that Imbrian Arts even has a web store.

You've all been amazing and supportive throughout all the hurdles and setbacks we've had. We hope that you'll give these KS campaigns your blessing and help them succeed so that we can release miniatures faster and fulfil our commitment to bringing you awesome miniatures as fast as we can.

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Jody has had some difficulties, but he is currently still working on the fulfillment, so his first project, while greatly delayed, is still in the process. I believe that he was in part taken by surprise by the success it had and he fell into the same trap as Tre Manor did with overcommitment, and then he has had a lot of personal issues that he now has worked through. As some of you know, I have been working together with Jody for my own project and he is really a great sculptor, but no need really for me to say it as his skills speak for themselves. :) And these miniatures in this Kickstarter are looking amazing. Those zombies are so good. :p I will be supporting him once more. Can't stay away from them resin stuff. :D

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Grefven has the gist from what I've gleaned from Jody over the years talking to him on FB. He's been pretty open with me about a lot of this stuff, and is honestly trying to make the best of things and make things as right as possible for backers of the first KS. Stuff like this is how he can get there, bringing new life into the product line.

 

I have all but the death knight from this batch and they're AMAZING. I mean, I bought a second lich.

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I've not been asked about this and have had no replies to my inquires regarding the status of my pledge rewards. 

 

Not ot a happy camper about this.

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Imbrian Arts was almost my second Kickstarter pledged, after Reaper's Bones I.

 

Like Darsc Zacal, I am also not a happy camper.  It has been what, four years?  and I have received nothing at all.

 

If the other pledgers were asked, I never heard a thing.

 

Not happy at all.  Pretty sculpts mean nothing if you never receive any of them.

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Try reading updates and communicating with Jody. He's been responsive and awesome.

 

I paid for extra shipping to get some minis early, because I don't expect him to pay for it out of pocket.

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8 minutes ago, CashWiley said:

Try reading updates and communicating with Jody. He's been responsive and awesome.

 

I paid for extra shipping to get some minis early, because I don't expect him to pay for it out of pocket.

 

I paid extra for shipping a very long time ago.  I remain disappointed.

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I'm thinkin' about Andy Hopp.

He ran this KS for his "Low Life" miniatures, in which I participated. Between pledging and fulfillment, I underwent a really NASTY divorce, and found myself living in an apartment in San Antonio, putting the pieces of my life together again. I'd forgotten about Andy's KS completely.

Until he sent me a personal email, asking "Hey, I got the minis back in the mail, marked "addressee unknown." Are you okay? Did you change addresses?"

I replied with my new address. He shipped me the minis free of charge.

It doesn't take much to demonstrate good faith. After four years, though, I'd be inclined to write off the situation as "a learning experience on who not to trust.". Talk is cheap. Actions matter.

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Jody has had my personal email address and my private phone number for many years now.

 

I've sent him another request for an update on the status of my pledge rewards and have resent him all my contact information and what exactly I had pledged for. There is nothing new. There has been no changes in any of the info over the years since the Kickstarter. This is all the same info he already has.

 

Waiting for a response.

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*Pops into thread out of morbid curiosity*

 

*Sees that people are still defending Jody after all these years*

 

*Shakes head sadly and walks away*

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22 minutes ago, aku-chan said:

*Pops into thread out of morbid curiosity*

 

*Sees that people are still defending Jody after all these years*

 

*Shakes head sadly and walks away*

 

Don't get me wrong. I am not defending what has happened in the first Kickstarter. But from what I know, what backers have still not yet received from their rewards are the stuff who is still not sculped, while the stuff that is ready and available have been shipped out. For this project, the death knight, liche and zombies are sculpted, resin masters are cast, and a quote has been received by the casters. This sounds, to me, that it will be a fairly quick fulfillment if the items are more or less ready to go out of the door.

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Posted (edited)

If he has not finished sculpting the miniatures from his Kickstarter four and a half years ago, what reassurance do people have that he will fulfil this Kickstarter in a timely fashion?

 

 

Edited by Pingo
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I don't have any stake in the last Imbrian Art KS, but looking at it, it seems to me he started with only a very small number of sculpts on offer and added lots of stuff during the Kickstarter?

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