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Looking good , the girls face is stunning and I just love the Vampire.

The Fighters eyes are also wonderful!

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16 hours ago, Xherman1964 said:

Looking good , the girls face is stunning and I just love the Vampire.

The Fighters eyes are also wonderful!

Thanks Xherman! For me usually the two hardest things on a figure are eyes and metal, so if I can get those right, everything else kind of falls into place

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1 hour ago, Silvervane said:

Very nice! Nice job on recreating the colors from the artwork.

Thanks Silvervane! On hindsight I wish I would have painted the dress pink instead of green to be more faithful to the painting but I wanted more contrast. Oh well, next time I decided to do art imitating art....

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3 hours ago, 72moonglum said:

Thanks Silvervane! On hindsight I wish I would have painted the dress pink instead of green to be more faithful to the painting but I wanted more contrast. Oh well, next time I decided to do art imitating art....

 

I like the green dress.

 

Besides...there is not a girl in the world that only has one dress...

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