Cyradis

High Altitude Painting

44 posts in this topic

The dollar is still strong but it has weakened a bit recently. 

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On 4/16/2017 at 10:05 PM, Doug Sundseth said:

Vallejo requires different techniques than Reaper (also true between essentially every brand of paint). They have a reputation for a bit lower durability and more problems with pigment falling out of solution. But their selection of colors is very good and you can certainly get good results from them. If you decide to order paints online, you might want to try the Scale75 line. Their metallics are amazing and their range is quite good. I'll also mention that Golden Fluid Acrylics are an excellent choice if you're willing to mix, though they tend to be gloss or semi-gloss, so you might want to pick up some Testors Dullcote if you try them.

 

Golden also has a line of Matte Fluid Acrylics.  They are not quite as matte as hobby paints and they only come in 4-ounce bottles, but I find them quite suitable for my needs.

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On 4/17/2017 at 1:33 AM, Cyradis said:

Doug, that sounds wonderful! I'll have to skip May, as I'm leaving for a research workshop that month. I'll put it on my calendar for June though. I may be able to go to that shop before then though and check out the selection of paints ::):

 

I do a lot of my work with my favorite two size 0's, one a synthetic and one a sable. The tips are good enough for most purposes, but not quite enough for what I want to improve to (that I can tell at least). Brush shopping is likely in order anyway. 

I've never used a wet palette before. How do those work? Easy to wash? Right now I go between a sheet of tin foil and a plastic palette, dabbing excess paint on a paper towel and I check consistency and shape-on-brush on a white notecard. A

I'm stuck with atrocious lighting in my basement nook which doesn't help with the drying - one of the lamps is a minor heat source.... right over my workspace. I really need to find myself a better bulb for that (or thrift-store up a bunch of half-decent lamps). 

Crappy setup, I know. 

Paint Brushes discussion thread

A DYI Wet Pallet thread

Another good wet pallet thread

And an issues thread I started way back when I started using one....

 

Get some clip on desk lamps and put OTTLIGHT bulbs in them, best stuff to paint under ever as far as I'm concerned....

You can usually find the bulbs at Michael's etc, so don't forget you coupons!

 

And Cyradis, I sent you a pm....

 

Hope some of those things help!

George

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Awesome, George. Thanks! Debating which brushes to get now. From your link, thinking the Rosemary 0 and a 1 at least. Any other sizes you like of theirs?

 

I do have one small Ottlight, but it isn't enough. Will see if Joann's has Ottlight bulbs too; the local Michael's went out of business recently. Not only is my standard junker lamp a minor heat source, but it is starting to hurt my eyes. I feel the heat face first when I'm engrossed in a figure. 

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No need to go for anything smaller than a #0 on the Rosemary & Co brushes. They're really, really pointy. (I mostly use my #1 these days)

But consider picking up a small filbert or two. They don't have to be Kolinsky Sable, though. I find filberts good for getting an even coat on 'large' areas. (Isn't it weird that we can consider an area the size of a finger nail as 'large'?)

 

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5 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

No need to go for anything smaller than a #0 on the Rosemary & Co brushes. They're really, really pointy. (I mostly use my #1 these days)

But consider picking up a small filbert or two. They don't have to be Kolinsky Sable, though. I find filberts good for getting an even coat on 'large' areas. (Isn't it weird that we can consider an area the size of a finger nail as 'large'?)

 

It is indeed funny! But eh, to each subject its own scale. I don't think I am all that capable of working on actual big scales; I've been a fan of small art for as long as I can remember.

 

Filbert it is for another brush. I had been checking those out, they seem good for shading. 

 

When using your Rosemary #1, are you reserving it for the fine detail, or also using it for medium size stuff and small bits of blending? 

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The mantra you will hear and are hearing is use the biggest brush you can. Certainly that requires a quality brush but I routinely paint eyes with a my Da Vinci #1. I occasionally use a 0 but not on every mini and most of my work is with a #1 or #2 with good points. Using a big brush really helps painting at altitude.

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I have cheap brushes I use for primer and varnish, but everyting else except the stuff that I do with a filbert is done with the #1, yes.

Of course, I still suck at blending, shading and so on, but that's because I'm me

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There is a place for cheaper brushes in everyone's arsenal.

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Eh, practice is practice. We shall get the shading and blending over time :) 

I am think I need to retest some of my old paints better too. I noticed an old figure had much smoother application of paint on the skin than my current WIP. Maybe I need to shake better, maybe I'm just rusty, but something's up. New brush will be good, but if the paints are ick, hard to remedy that without replacement. I'll add a #2 to my shopping cart on the brushes though :) 

 

This is the old one I pulled off a shelf (2010 or 2011). I love how she turned out (if I did it again, I'd add highlighting to the purple and a few other spots, and be more specific on the sword). Her face has thicker eyeliner than I'm doing now, but the skin turned out so well regarding smoothness! 

 

IG_878_2.jpg

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My wet palette just arrived, along with a set of mid-grade brushes that got good amazon reviews - they look like they'll be nice for general non-destructive purposes, but not the ultrafine detail (and considering I have old junkers right now, this will help until my fancy ones arrive). 

 

ONWARD TO.... okay, making my March for Science poster, then PAINTING! 

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Cool to see so many Colorado people like myself. I am curious about Total Escape. I might have to attend one of these meetings.

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28 minutes ago, Lorathorn said:

Cool to see so many Colorado people like myself. I am curious about Total Escape. I might have to attend one of these meetings.

 

Next paint day will be 20 May; put it on your calendar now so you won't schedule over it. ::D:

 

(We really do hope to see you either then or at a later date.)

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Posted (edited)

Im out here in the high desert part of Colorado, Its necessary for me to use a wet palate to help the paint flow smoothly. I use wet paper towel and parchment and it works well. If i use retarder its only for blending as it makes the paint to 

thin for fine detail .

Edited by Tjrez
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