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whoohaaah

New painter, Kobold and Deladrin

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Hello, I'm a brand new to the hobby and a loving how (surprisingly) relaxing it is. 

I've never been an artistic person, but i got into it because i liked the idea of creating my "custom" tabletop minis.

 

These two are first I've ever done. I think it went ok for a first try, but definitely lacking and needing A LOT of work; it looks really messy.

I would love some constructive criticism. Thank you. 

 

Also just a few questions:

1. How long do you usually wait for initial base coats to dry before doing a second/third coat? 

2. I'm a little confused on how/when to apply shadows, highlights, glazes, etc.

 

Reaper Bones Kobolds (first ever).

20170418_185254.thumb.jpg.3af90637e57b6579f7594da2af04c3df.jpg20170418_185226.thumb.jpg.37ad922123f2a7bc6a8d574517b43022.jpg20170418_185159.thumb.jpg.038fe628e2cda50d6a305c57c33a1332.jpg20170418_185143.thumb.jpg.36d94962500a179a9da3ef4e9c422173.jpg

 

 

Reaper Bones Deladrin (second)

20170420_212203_HDR.thumb.jpg.a5146318e93f656e3411167eeb04a02c.jpg20170420_212210_HDR.thumb.jpg.789745c0c68c5b6903f4ced02985e6ab.jpg

Edited by whoohaaah
added Deladrin
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Welcome to the Madhouse!  We're all Mad as Hatter's here, although the multicolored wolves will probably disagree about the angry sounding nature of that statement, as they do not suffer from their malady, but rather enjoy it (I'm being silly, by the way, which normally comes in some tone of purple on these forums along with sarcasm). 

 

First off, the section you really wanted to post this in is Works in Progress (I'd recommend pinging a mod to move the topic).  No biggie there, we ALL have made mistakes on topic placement, self included.  Second point.  You're painting bones.  Good choice!  I am rather fond of the Bones Kobolds, as they are very forgiving despite your feelings towards them being sloppy.  Paint looks to be in the generally correct locations.  I'm going to give you a basic tabletop (see my house) idea of how to paint.  I paint at a variety of levels, but tabletop is a good starting point, and you're already 90% of the way there (you do have bare plastic showing on the bases...  see, madness I tells ya, madness!). 

 

Anyhoo, you've started with what is known as the "base coat" or mid-tone of the pieces.  This gets the basic feel of the piece out there, and it CAN be a bit messy to start.  The best advice here, if you want to make your life easier later, is to make sure your brush maintains its point, much like a pencil, a pointed brush works better than one that is frayed. 

 

Drying times vary by relative humidity and primer on the bones.  Usually, with acrylic paints, only a few minutes is needed.  That can be longer in cooler and more humid areas, but usually less than 6 minutes is a good solid time.  If it smears, you can let it dry a bit longer (and clean your brush if that happens!). 

 

After the base coat, a darker tone is usually applied using a thinned down, darker paint (with reds and earth tones, a dark brown thinned quite a bit to make a wash).  A wash is relatively transparent over the other paint, and is intended to seep into the cracks of the base coat.  It will darken the base coat. 

 

After this you can reclaim the base coat by repainting areas that got darkened that you did not wish to darken, or you can move straight to highlighting, which you can do as a general direct from above highlighting (my preference, and a good way for most beginners to paint), or you can move to something more challenging, but that can come later. 

 

I hope you find this helpful, and not just a wall of text.  By comparison, the earliest photographed model I have on file is this one:

 

AzzyFront.jpg.c1ea8b4fbd3a1ae87a4d3f5c69a89cb8.jpg

 

We all start somewhere.  You've got a good start on much smaller, much more complicated miniatures.  Here's hoping to seeing more progress!

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Thank you for the quick response. 

Yeah the bases are extremely messy. I'm waiting on bases to glue them on, but wanted to "master" the basics of painting the actual minis first. 

 

I purchased basic brushes and i think the 0 and 1 which i am using are already splaying. Just waiting on a better brushes.

 

What do you mean by "which you can do as a general direct from above highlighting"? 

 

 

 

 

Mods, please move to "Work in Progress" 

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Think about where the light is coming from, and hit the "top" of the ridges and tops of the muscles and so on that would be facing the light  The shadows will be opposite that or in the crevasses of the miniature.

 

Sorry, getting sleepy (night time medicine).  My apologies for being less clear there.  That's a sure sign it's time for bed... 

 

As to brushes, check the brush health coach needed thread (can't figure out linking at the moment) in this section of the forums.  Also, you may want to think about LARGER brushes, which seems counterintuitive, but it's true.  Think about maybe a size 2 or even a size 3 brush for some of your base-coating needs, which will allow more paint to be taken into the ferrule, meaning more painting and less wear on the brush itself.  I use a size 2 or 3 for a lot of my later brush work.  In fact, Abyzarran here was painted mostly with a #3 brush, until the very end, when I went down to a number 1 for his eyes and tongue.  (also a good comparison for progress versus the Chainmail Aasimar cleric above.  The Aasimar was painted circa 2006, while Abyzarran below here was painted in 2013, so PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE!).

 

 

post-6484-0-72187900-1380389624_thumb.jpg

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Er, you don't actually want to take paint up to the ferrule of a paintbrush.  

 

The ferrule is the metal collar that holds the hairs of a brush to its handle.  On the whole best practice is to not get paint more than halfway up the hairs to the ferrule.  I violate this all the time on my cheaper brushes, but be aware that it can shorten the lifespan of the brushes, especially if any paint dries in there.

 

On the whole I keep three brushes by my palette when I am working:  a good brush (usually at least a size 1) for painting with; a cheap brush kept damp and at the ready to blot away any errors before they dry; and a slightly larger cheap brush to mix paint colors with.

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Don't be afraid to try the Learn to Paint kits that Reaper sells.  They come with minis, paint, brushes and instructions that are very detailed and should get you started nicely.

 

An easy way to get started is to paint your minis with colors that are slightly brighter than what you are wanting and then use a purpose made wash to bring out the detail.  If you pick the right base colors, paint neatly and don't leave too much wash on the mini, it'll turn out quite nice.

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For your first, you're doing way better than I on my first. And second. And third... :ph34r:

 

You'll want to start off by:

thin_paints2.jpg.aca5224e0b9b6d9057abbdf5f9d2762a.jpg

 

Okay, so don't go overboard like my son, there, but do thin them a bit. This will help with control, layering, blending, washes, glazes and the like.

 

Also, at the top of this forum is a pinned post called "Directory of Tips & Advice Resources." Very very good links to all sorts of good knowledge collected over the years. I'll let you browse for now and not overwhelm you. Welcome to the forum. ^_^ 

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3 minutes ago, Aryanun said:

Also, at the top of this forum is a pinned post called "Directory of Tips & Advice Resources." Very very good links to all sorts of good knowledge collected over the years.

 

If you've never seen anyone paint, be sure to check out the videos in the pinned post Aryanun referred to, this one:

 

Directory of Tips & Advice Resources

 

It can be considerably easier to learn by seeing someone applying paint to a figure either in person or on video.  The amount of material that's been published on painting miniatures is staggering, and a great deal of it is free.  

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They seem to have you covered on most of the actual painting basics, so I'll add something else. 

 

Don't have caffeine for ~4hrs before painting. I usually guzzle strong black tea and don't notice it during general day to day activities. When I'm painting, I notice my hands shaking, even just a tinge. Keep your hand steady. 

 

To aggravate this more, avoid painting while tired for the same reason. It is worse than painting one beer in. Hydration is a great way to alleviate both being tired and over caffeinated. Get some water - and don't put the brush in that one!  

 

Take time to rest your eyes, even if just a few minutes. 

Hang out on the forums a lot. My figures improve drastically for each bout of time I spend lurking on here or asking questions. 

 

Learn from every figure you do; number them or put a date on the bottom. Don't just paint the same way every time. $3-10 per figure adds up, make them count! If you are conscious of what you want to improve or practice on a given figure each time, you'll get better very swiftly. It is pretty fun to line them up and see what's changed. Note what figure challenges different skills, and use them deliberately for that. Pick some that are "easy" and some that are difficult for your skill level. 

 

Be prepared to make a lot of mistakes, and correct them. Part of the game is knowing how to minimize mistakes, or make them so that they are more easily corrected. You'll learn from trial and error, and from reading. 

 

Welcome and I hope you have fun! 

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Welcome to the forum!!!!

 

There are threads about painting and modelling, look at the Painting and Advice threads!

You might also want to go to youtube and search for "painting fantasy miniatures" there are lots of vids out there to show you how to paint.

 

The most important thing is to have fun. and practice does make great!

I have been painting for decades and since I joined this forum in 2013 i feel like I have learned more than ever.

Make a WIP ( Work in Progress) and people will look at what you're doing and you can ask advice.

People and other Creatures here are friendly and will be eager to help out.

 

If you want to indulge in the madness, visit the randomcy thread some time.

Keep in mind, if you see text posted in Purple,, it's meant as a joke/irony/sarcasm, so not serious..

 

Example:

I hate to paint minis...

This is not true of course...

 

And the most important rule of all..

If you spot a Wolf ( multicoloured or not) feed us BACON!!!

 

Have Fun!

 

 

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DEFINITELY pick up the Reaper Learn to Paint Kits. Besides instructions, you will have a good starter kit of paints. I also recommend the Army Painter Quickshade Ink set, when you start looking at washes to speed up and enhance your painting.

 

Reaper, btw, will have its Bones IV KS after they deliver their current KS miniatures to backers. They will typically sell sets of paint at a good price. 

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I'll third the Reaper LTPK's.  Just for the materials they come with (paint, brushes, minis) alone they are a great deal.  Add to that some fabulous instructions and they are pure gold for a beginner.  I myself am very much a beginner but hanging out here, watching some YouTube vids (I'm partial to Ghool's Quick Tips, but there are tons out there), using the LTPK, etc. has already upped my game.  That's not to say that I am on par with a lot of the artists here (hey, some of them have been painting for decades, they should be better than me :) ) but I do already feel as though I have improved. 

 

Don't be afraid to post your work and doing WIPs can be a great help.  I've gotten lots of help from people here while working on a mini and have never gotten anything I considered negative.  We're all very kind to each other in the asylum. 

 

As for your brushes splaying, you may be able to get them back into shape with a combination of brush soap and twisting your brush as you wipe paint off of it.  It will still splay again, but you can frequently get it back to a point.  Its not until you start to get individual hairs that refuse to go with the flow no matter what that you really have to start to worry.  And even then, those brushes will have their uses (whether for dry brushing, applying brush on primer, etc.).

 

Most important though:  Welcome aboard and have fun!  As long as you are having fun, you are doing it right!

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Don't get discouraged. No one started off great. And everyone advances at their own pace. Try, as much as possible, to not compare yourself to other artists. 

 

I'm not sure what everyone else covered, because I just skimmed. Good brushes are worth the money if you plan to continue painting. Seriously. Not that cheap brushes don't have their place too, but if you have a good brush it makes things so much easier. The same thing with good paints. Amazing things can be accomplished with craft paints. I've seen it. But with craft paint you will have to fight the properties of the paints. So, if you want to continue painting into the future, you might invest in at least a handful of good paints. If you are worried about budget you can pick up the basic AV colors at Hobby Lobby. I've heard of one guy who bought one per day using the 40% off coupon they offer. There are a zillion colors from a zillion brands. Don't get overwhelmed. While it's nice to have triads and specialty paints you can do amazing things with the basic colors if you are willing to mix. Check out Pingo's work. She mixes a lot of colors, and her work is off the chain. There are a zillion and one videos you can watch for free on YouTube. Dry brushing has, for some reason, often been associated with sub par painting. And sometimes it can be. But it is also a powerful tool you can use. Be sure to post your work. Ask for feedback if you want it. There are so many insanely talented people on this board, and they are all pretty friendly. I don't know a single person on here who won't go out of their way to be helpful. Don't be afraid to try things outside your comfort zone. Above all other things have fun, and enjoy the company here. Great looking Kobolds. I look forward to seeing more of your work. Cheers.  

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Thank you everyone. 

I'll continue practicing, waiting on a few more bones minis and also a series 7 brush (to see if it makes a difference for me). 

 

Glad to be on the forums, everyone is extremely helpful and awesome! 

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