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whoohaaah

New painter, Kobold and Deladrin

40 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Welcome!  

 

I just wanted to trow my 2 cents in, although it looks like you've got plenty of advise from some great painters on this forum.

 

I am new to painting as well, I think I've been at it for a couple months now and I really enjoy it!  I agree with you that it is very relaxing.  I am a classic worrier and over thinker and have never really found a hobby that "clears my head" until I started painting minis.  

 

Anyways I don't think I can give you tips that previous comments haven't touched on but I wanted to tell you of a couple of YouTube channels that have really helped me advance quite a bit in just a short time.

 

Dr. Faust's Painting Clinic- A lot of his videos teach about layering and highlighting.

TheApatheticFish- Shows how to paint up simple yet very nice tabletop as well as some different techniques for shading and highlighting.

Sorastro's Painting-  (By far my favorite!) He breaks down each paint job in 4-5 easy steps.  He shows a lot about using washes and then building back up the color to add depth and detail as well as shading and highlighting.  (I highly recommend watching his videos have helped me sooo much)

 

There are tons more as well but these ones I found to give me a better understanding of how and what to do to really bring life to your paint job.  Sometimes watching these can be a little intimidating since they are so good but just pay attention to some of their techniques and after a couple practice runs you will be on your way.

 

Also, bravo!  I haven't tried painting anything as small as a Kobold so jumping on that right away is impressive.

 

Lastly, if you are getting a series 7 then I really recommend checking out the threads mentioned above about how to care for your brushes and get a good brush cleaner/conditioner.  And as someone else mentioned my 1st couple of minis I was using teeny tiny brushes but found now that I mostly stick to the #2 or #1 as long as you keep them taken care of then the point of the brush should be fine enough to paint most small details.

 

Lastly lastly, the people on this forum are extremely nice and helpful so you have come to a great place!  

 

Oh, and maybe consider looking into a wet pallet (there are lots of posts on here about them).  Make your own though, don't spend the $20 for a ready made one.

  

Edited by NecroMancer
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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, whoohaaah said:

Thank you everyone. 

I'll continue practicing, waiting on a few more bones minis and also a series 7 brush (to see if it makes a difference for me). 

 

Glad to be on the forums, everyone is extremely helpful and awesome! 

 

I like my Series 7's a lot (though I know plenty of people prefer Raphael's or others).  That said, one piece of advice I got (and which I agree with now that I have gotten a few more minis under my belt) is to not use your really good (read expensive) brushes for base coating (and certainly not for priming if you use brush on).  The main reason being that you often end up wanting to reach/force/jab/etc. the brush into tight spaces which will of course ruin it quicker.  You might also find you are using thicker paint for basecoating than shading/highlighting which if you are not careful can also wear your brush out quicker.  In other words, much better to use that $3 or $4 brush you got at Hobby Lobby than the $15 brush.  I've also known painters who will eventually convert their good brushes to their "cheap" brushes as they start to get wear and tear on them.  In other words, even as a brush starts to break down, you can still find uses for them.

 

And as I continue thinking about it . . . I also recall being told not to use the good brushes with metallic paints because the metal flakes in the paints can break the brushes down.  I'm a bit paranoid about brush care (not as much as some perhaps but still a bit paranoid) due to being somewhat of a cheapskate, so I go so far as to even having a separate rinse cup for my metallic paints/brushes as the flakes of metal will rinse off the brushes into the cup, which can then be picked up by other brushes.  This may be a bit over board, but it also goes to show that even as one brush starts to wear out, you can still find uses for it.

1 hour ago, whoohaaah said:

 

Edited by Gargs
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There's also the Miniature Monthly channel.

(Search them out on Patreon. Good stuff. And backers over $5 joins the monthly mini giveaway lottery)

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, NecroMancer said:

Welcome!  

Dr. Faust's Painting Clinic- A lot of his videos teach about layering and highlighting.

TheApatheticFish- Shows how to paint up simple yet very nice tabletop as well as some different techniques for shading and highlighting.

Sorastro's Painting-  (By far my favorite!) He breaks down each paint job in 4-5 easy steps.  He shows a lot about using washes and then building back up the color to add depth and detail as well as shading and highlighting.  (I highly recommend watching his videos have helped me sooo much)

 

 

  

 

I've been watching Sorastro (and yes I agree his stuff is amazing!!) and miniwargamer. I'll check out the other 2 as well, thank you!

 

I can't wait for my order to ship (ordered 10 reaper bones).

Just like you, I was searching for a hobby that is very relaxing; though sometimes I'm scared I'll get in the habit of overthinking painting and then having it stress me out ::(:

 

 

Edited by whoohaaah
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I'm going to second the recommendation for quality brushes, and will mention that I've used W&N S7Ms for years.

 

Acrylic paint dries very quickly. We often mix "retarder" in with it to slow the drying time if we want to blend paints on the figure while they are still wet. I paint under an old incandescent "natural" bulb, and the heat accelerates drying. If you aren't using acrylics, your mileage may vary.

 

Highlighting and shadowing are easy. Shadows are a darkening that goes into the depths of the figure - those areas such as underarms, folds in cloaks, the back of the knees, etc. It's a simple matter of taking a darker version of your main color, diluting it until it is no longer opaque, and then selectively applying it. Ink also works well for this; it's thin enough to run into the crevices itself (note that holding the figure in the correct position until the ink dries will help with this).

 

Highlighting is just the opposite. Take a lighter shade than than your base shade (often simply made by mixing in some white paint, or yellow if you are lightening red), thin it so it's transparent, and paint it on the high spots, such as forehead, cheekbones, elbows, the ends of sleeves and pants legs, anything that sticks up above surface, etc. It will take a bit of practice to get the paint density thin enough to be transparent without running into places you don't want it.

 

I'll add two suggestions for you. The first is dark lining. This is simply taking a dark color, usually dark brown or black, thinning it carefully, and "lining" where different sections meet, such as between sleeves and hands, around where a sword lays against a body, where a cloak meets the rest of the clothing, etc. It will really help each part of the mini stand out.

 

The second suggestion is to use a dull coat. I use Golden Archival Varnish spray, and I'm probably going to get a lot of complaints because I'll point out it is *cheaper and better* than Testor's dull coat, which most people use simply because it's more readily available. The problem with Testor's is it's not archival, which means it *CAN* yellow with time, and to be honest, if this hasn't happened to someone, that's nice, but I've heard from enough very knowledgeable people it HAS happened to that I'm not willing to take the chance. If someone uses Testor's and has not had this happen, I really don't need to hear about it as it changes nothing and the problem can still occur. It's a bit like driving a Pinto - not many of them exploded, but it was still considered a big problem as it happened far too often. I buy my spray at Dick Blick's art store for about $16/can or so.

 

One thing that is true of all flattening sprays is they can be sensitive to temperature and humidity. I only spray outside on warm days when the humidity is low. This means I can't spray during winter and have to be careful during spring, as warmer days are often too humid because it's going to rain soon. Just be patient, and don't spray too much or the microscopic plates that break up the light will begin piling up and actually cause your finish to become shiny.

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13 minutes ago, Madog Barfog said:

I'm going to second the recommendation for quality brushes, and will mention that I've used W&N S7Ms for years.

 

Acrylic paint dries very quickly. We often mix "retarder" in with it to slow the drying time if we want to blend paints on the figure while they are still wet. I paint under an old incandescent "natural" bulb, and the heat accelerates drying. If you aren't using acrylics, your mileage may vary.

 

Highlighting and shadowing are easy. Shadows are a darkening that goes into the depths of the figure - those areas such as underarms, folds in cloaks, the back of the knees, etc. It's a simple matter of taking a darker version of your main color, diluting it until it is no longer opaque, and then selectively applying it. Ink also works well for this; it's thin enough to run into the crevices itself (note that holding the figure in the correct position until the ink dries will help with this).

 

Highlighting is just the opposite. Take a lighter shade than than your base shade (often simply made by mixing in some white paint, or yellow if you are lightening red), thin it so it's transparent, and paint it on the high spots, such as forehead, cheekbones, elbows, the ends of sleeves and pants legs, anything that sticks up above surface, etc. It will take a bit of practice to get the paint density thin enough to be transparent without running into places you don't want it.

 

I'll add two suggestions for you. The first is dark lining. This is simply taking a dark color, usually dark brown or black, thinning it carefully, and "lining" where different sections meet, such as between sleeves and hands, around where a sword lays against a body, where a cloak meets the rest of the clothing, etc. It will really help each part of the mini stand out.

 

 

Thank you, this clears is up a lot.

Quick question.

In the kobolds, I only have 1 kind of blue and red paint. Would I be able to mix some white and black/brown paint (along with thinning appropriately) to make shadows and highlighting, without having to buy a set of lighter and darker paints?

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6 minutes ago, whoohaaah said:

 

Thank you, this clears is up a lot.

Quick question.

In the kobolds, I only have 1 kind of blue and red paint. Would I be able to mix some white and black/brown paint (along with thinning appropriately) to make shadows and highlighting, without having to buy a set of lighter and darker paints?

 

Yup, you can mix white or black/brown to the blue and red to make your darkening and highlighting paints. The trouble for me is making them repeatable though (it is doable, but I get nitpicky). Absolutely worth playing with paint mixing though. Despite my reservations on it, I used that just last night to create the right color for a facial scar on a figure :) 

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You should be able to mix black and white with your blue to make shadows and highlights, red is trickier.

 

Since exactly these techniques are covered in the Bones Learn to Paint Kit (the core skills one) I highly recommend it. Also look into some Masters brush soap for that series 7 brush.

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12 minutes ago, whoohaaah said:

 

Thank you, this clears is up a lot.

Quick question.

In the kobolds, I only have 1 kind of blue and red paint. Would I be able to mix some white and black/brown paint (along with thinning appropriately) to make shadows and highlighting, without having to buy a set of lighter and darker paints?

 

Dr. Faust has a good tutorial on painting red.  From what I can remember brown is a good color to shade red with.

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Brown is fine for shading red, but if you use white to make it a highlight, you will end up with pink, not a brighter red. If you want a brighter red, add *yellow* to it. This is the only color I can think of offhand that breaks the rule of adding white for highlighting.

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Mixing green with red can also give you a nice shade.  Blue can also work with the right red though it gives it a different color to the shade (more of a purple obviously, but if your colors are dark enough it actually can create a nice transition).  A straight up brown or green mixed with red is probably the easiest though.

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1 hour ago, Madog Barfog said:

The second suggestion is to use a dull coat. I use Golden Archival Varnish spray, and I'm probably going to get a lot of complaints ...

 

Actually probably not, around here.  Useful info is useful.

1 hour ago, whoohaaah said:

 

Thank you, this clears is up a lot.

Quick question.

In the kobolds, I only have 1 kind of blue and red paint. Would I be able to mix some white and black/brown paint (along with thinning appropriately) to make shadows and highlighting, without having to buy a set of lighter and darker paints?

 

Eyeballing your photos in the OP, it looks to me like your one red is a bright, very slightly pinkish (i.e. not orange) red and your blue is a kind of middle electric blue.

 

I'll start with the blue because it's easier.  Blue can be lightened with a simple admixture of white and darkened with all sorts of colors.  I prefer purple, sometimes mellowed with a little admixture of brown, for shadows in blues, but it really depends on what I'm doing.  I do like using contrasting colors for shadows and shading.  It's perfectly okay to use a little black in the deepest shadows of a blue, although tempering it with some of the same blue often works a little better.

 

Red, phew.  Red is one of those weird things.  From looking at a lot of red things, I have concluded that the highlight for red is red.  Use anything lighter and it will look pink, beige, or worse.  This means that the way to shade reds is to bring the shadows all the way down, maybe even with black.

 

Here are some examples I painted red, with purple or even black shadows:

DSC_0146.jpgDSC_0070.jpg

Hellakin035.jpg

Hellakin032.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Pingo said:

Red, phew.  Red is one of those weird things.  From looking at a lot of red things, I have concluded that the highlight for red is red.  Use anything lighter and it will look pink, beige, or worse.  This means that the way to shade reds is to bring the shadows all the way down, maybe even with black.

I feel like Kuro shaded with brown in his tutorial vid for the vampire? (Yes... I looked it up). This is advanced, but I love his videos, and having ideas to experiment with is what makes this hobby fun. Don't worry about not getting results like this, Kuro is really good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr-HfgoBg-M

 

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Welcome to the forum(s)! I don't know what else to add, really. I guess I could talk about the days when YouTube wasn't a thing and no one around you painted models so you had to figure it out yourself. Those were the good ol' days :mellow:.

 

I'll say this: get a collection of brushes, not just the holiness of W&N Series 7s. (Now that I think about it, someone else could've already said this but I don't too much care as it bears repeating.) For instance, I started painting minis with Games Workshop - you know: Warhammer 40,000 and, at the time, Warhammer Fantasy Battles - and they recommended using all their brushes and paints for the best possible job at the time. Anyway, as a novice painter, I did as they bade and bought into their brand of stuff. They don't have bad stuff. I found the brushes to be middle-of-the-road after trying the bargain brushes at hobby establishments and after adopting the superb Series 7s. Those are a great thing to find. You have your work mules (GW products) that won't let you down and then you have your warhorses (Series 7). That is, if you find a robust, correctly built GW brush. I always did, though.

 

I say all that to say this: if you're picky, have a brush for each range of task (eg, basecoating, washing, layering, and highlighting). I used to be very strict with this mindset. Now? Pff. I still use a separate set of brushes for washing and maybe for basecoating but everything else is done with the same set of brushes. The pink soap (Masters or something) will fix just about any problems you run into.

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@whoohaaah When building up a paint selection it can be extremely useful to have very dark and very light versions of a few colors. The dark ones are especially useful. A very dark brown, purple, red, green or blue is often nicer to use than mixing black into each color for shading. They give you so many options for shading beyond black. Not that black doesn't work. It does. It's just that using dark colors wasn't something I heard about as a beginner, and color contrast is a powerful tool for shading. Although, using ready made shades and washes is another popular option that I also use (like in Sorastro's videos). These colors are not necessary, but they're worth mentioning. 

 

I don't have anything actually useful to add, but your username is pretty awesome. It reminds me of Namie Amuro's song WoWa:lol:

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