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whoohaaah

New painter, Kobold and Deladrin

40 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Mehman said:

Welcome to the forum(s)! I don't know what else to add, really. I guess I could talk about the days when YouTube wasn't a thing and no one around you painted models so you had to figure it out yourself. Those were the good ol' days :mellow:.

 

I'll say this: get a collection of brushes, not just the holiness of W&N Series 7s. (Now that I think about it, someone else could've already said this but I don't too much care as it bears repeating.) For instance, I started painting minis with Games Workshop - you know: Warhammer 40,000 and, at the time, Warhammer Fantasy Battles - and they recommended using all their brushes and paints for the best possible job at the time. Anyway, as a novice painter, I did as they bade and bought into their brand of stuff. They don't have bad stuff. I found the brushes to be middle-of-the-road after trying the bargain brushes at hobby establishments and after adopting the superb Series 7s. Those are a great thing to find. You have your work mules (GW products) that won't let you down and then you have your warhorses (Series 7). That is, if you find a robust, correctly built GW brush. I always did, though.

 

I say all that to say this: if you're picky, have a brush for each range of task (eg, basecoating, washing, layering, and highlighting). I used to be very strict with this mindset. Now? Pff. I still use a separate set of brushes for washing and maybe for basecoating but everything else is done with the same set of brushes. The pink soap (Masters or something) will fix just about any

problems you run into.

 

Thanks for the advice.

I have a set of artist loft 10 brush set from michael's and awaiting a 0 and 2 series 7 brushes.

Once I get new minis, I'll try again with the craft brushes, but thinning paint more and less loaded brush. Then try the same with the series 7 brushes.

 

1 hour ago, CorallineAlgae said:

@whoohaaah When building up a paint selection it can be extremely useful to have very dark and very light versions of a few colors. The dark ones are especially useful. A very dark brown, purple, red, green or blue is often nicer to use than mixing black into each color for shading. They give you so many options for shading beyond black. Not that black doesn't work. It does. It's just that using dark colors wasn't something I heard about as a beginner, and color contrast is a powerful tool for shading. Although, using ready made shades and washes is another popular option that I also use (like in Sorastro's videos). These colors are not necessary, but they're worth mentioning. 

 

I don't have anything actually useful to add, but your username is pretty awesome. It reminds me of Namie Amuro's song WoWa:lol:

Lol thank you for the advice and compliment.

I've had it since I was in grade school actually. It's from a Busta Rhymes song titled Woo Hah!

 

 

Wow talk about a good day! I just received my series 7 from amazon. the #2 came in excellent condition, but the #0 already had a hair that bent and the tip is not pointy (looked used). So I had it RMA'd; I got my full refund and didn't have to return the brush ::D:

I know there is a slight difference in hair/reservoir length in the regular series 7 vs the miniature; but which one is generally better?

Edited by whoohaaah
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3 hours ago, Pingo said:

I'll start with the blue because it's easier.  Blue can be lightened with a simple admixture of white and darkened with all sorts of colors.  I prefer purple, sometimes mellowed with a little admixture of brown, for shadows in blues, but it really depends on what I'm doing.  I do like using contrasting colors for shadows and shading.  It's perfectly okay to use a little black in the deepest shadows of a blue, although tempering it with some of the same blue often works a little better.

 

Red, phew.  Red is one of those weird things.  From looking at a lot of red things, I have concluded that the highlight for red is red.  Use anything lighter and it will look pink, beige, or worse.  This means that the way to shade reds is to bring the shadows all the way down, maybe even with black.

 

Would shading/shadowing be the same as using specific washes on specific areas?

While highlighting is "manual" work in that you need to combine white with basecoat colors to make them lighter (if there are no available paint of lighter color).

Would these be correct assumption?

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17 minutes ago, whoohaaah said:

 

Would shading/shadowing be the same as using specific washes on specific areas?

While highlighting is "manual" work in that you need to combine white with basecoat colors to make them lighter (if there are no available paint of lighter color).

Would these be correct assumption?

 

Shading / shadowing isn't really a term of art for a particular technique.  It's any method that adds a bit of darkness to the underbits to simulate the effect of a shadow.

 

Washes are one way to shadow.  There is also glazing, using a nearly full strength paint on a damp brush and wiping off most of it so that it only lightly lays on translucent color over the surface.  There is also mixing up a straight shadow color, darker than the main color, and just painting it on straight and opaque.

 

White is a good way to lighten many colors, such as black, greys, blues, violets, and yellows.  But for colors like browns, reds, and greens, I find that a pale yellow works better.

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4 hours ago, whoohaaah said:

...

Wow talk about a good day! I just received my series 7 from amazon. the #2 came in excellent condition, but the #0 already had a hair that bent and the tip is not pointy (looked used). So I had it RMA'd; I got my full refund and didn't have to return the brush ::D:

I know there is a slight difference in hair/reservoir length in the regular series 7 vs the miniature; but which one is generally better?

 

You might want to try dipping that #0 into a bit of water and seeing if it will point. Good brushes will often take a fair amount of abuse and still spring back. (Not that you should try it just for an experiment, mind. :B):) If you have a single hair that is still bent, trim it with sharp scissors rather than trying to pull it out.

 

As to the Series 7 question, opinions vary. The Miniature brushes have much shorter hairs, which means that they hold less paint but are also stiffer. I strongly prefer the regular line, but I know a few painters much better than I am who prefer the Miniatures.

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Oh...and when you use drybrushing as a technique, use an old dedicated brush.

This will kill new brushes in an instant..

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Posted (edited)

Welcome! ^_^ It looks like awesome helpful advice has already been covered, so I'll just say: remember to have fun!! :bday:

 

There are LOADS of tools and techniques out there that you can try out and practice with, but if you're feeling stressed and overwhelmed, just pick one new thing and focus on that for awhile. Like right now, I'm just enjoying playing around with different metallic paints, and not worrying as much about shading and highlight placement. ^_^

 

Relax, have fun, and remember that perfect is the enemy of finished. :)

 

Huzzah!        

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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Actually, I think that was the most important bit of advice here. 

 

For most of us this is a hobby; something we do to relax and have a bit of quiet fun

(unless you prefer to listen to Dimmu Borgir at full volume on the stereo while painting...)

Never let it turn into a chore. 

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7 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

Actually, I think that was the most important bit of advice here. 

 

For most of us this is a hobby; something we do to relax and have a bit of quiet fun

(unless you prefer to listen to Dimmu Borgir at full volume on the stereo while painting...)

Never let it turn into a chore. 

 

Hey! That's relaxing and fun every once in a while too!

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11 hours ago, OneBoot said:

Welcome! ^_^ It looks like awesome helpful advice has already been covered, so I'll just say: remember to have fun!! :bday:

 

There are LOADS of tools and techniques out there that you can try out and practice with, but if you're feeling stressed and overwhelmed, just pick one new thing and focus on that for awhile. Like right now, I'm just enjoying playing around with different metallic paints, and not worrying as much about shading and highlight placement. ^_^

 

Relax, have fun, and remember that perfect is the enemy of finished. :)

 

Huzzah!        

--OneBoot :D

 

I really love that last one. Haven't heard that before, but I'm definitely going to keep that with me in this hobby as well as in life.

Thank you!!

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Posted (edited)

Just added my second mini

What yall think? 

 

I used a series 7 #2 and it worked wonderfully. But im afraid the #0 is done; it keeps spreading out and not holding its point. 

Anyways in this one i didn't use a varnish and also did some highlighting. I still need to measure how thin my paints are and how to properly go about basecoating. But i think it's an improvement to the kobolds. 

::D:

 

Thanks again everyone for thr advice. 

Edited by whoohaaah

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