Tjrez

Designing Color Schemes

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 I hate it when im trying to balance the colors on something and it just dont seem to work. Its kinda hard to picture the final piece in the color arrangement in the way you plan it unless you really take the time to visualize it. Thinking of using a pic off the gallery and filling in with colored pencil just to get an idea.. ..How do you guys plan your colors?

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I like this tool for visualizing color combinations. Its meant to choose colors for web pages and user interfaces but you can imagine paint schemes for miniatures too.

 

paletton.com

 

J--

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24 minutes ago, jsalyers said:

I like this tool for visualizing color combinations. Its meant to choose colors for web pages and user interfaces but you can imagine paint schemes for miniatures too.

 

paletton.com

 

J--

 

This is a great tool.  If only it would export a JPG that I could load into power pallet. 

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I'll typically come up with 2-4 major colors for a figure, usually in some combination that I grabbed from a color wheel or that I think will work. Often that will be a main color and one or two accent colors that contrast in hue, saturation, or value (so maybe dark green, light green, and a reddish brown, or white, dark gray, and purplish red, or whatever). The next step is to figure out where the dominant color will live and what the accents will be used for (that might be main color on the cloak, first accent on the tunic, second accent as trim and maybe a blend of two of them for the trousers). I try to make the remainder of the colors non-clashing detail stuff (black, gray, and browns that aren't too vibrant usually work well for these).

 

Then it's start painting. And sometimes while I'm painting, the composition will take over and wreck all my fine plans.

 

I've thought about pulling grayscale images from the website of the manufacturer and using Photoshop to color them in, but I mostly can't be bothered.

 

The one exception to that sort of freewheeling method for me is if I have fiddly freehand. That I try to draw out to get the proportions right and figure out the patterns. Knotwork or leaf patterns often have very rigid schemes that don't work very well when they're not thoroughly thought through.

 

Rough. Tough.

 

Enough. ::P:

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39 minutes ago, hdclearman said:

 

This is a great tool.  If only it would export a JPG that I could load into power pallet. 

 

You can get it to export a PNG. Can you work with that? You can convert a PNG to a JPG.

 

J--

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I usually start with whatever the main color will be and then look for things that complement it.  Test models or even just running paint around on the wet palette is usually enough to experiment with.  That Paletton site is amazing!  Thanks for sharing!

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This guy has a pretty good video on it. 

 If you guys find other videos can you link em for us.

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I honestly very rarely plan out colour schemes before I start painting; I just choose the colours that "feel" right. I actually think that's something that is both a strong point and a weak point for me as a painter. It's a strong point because I don't lock myself into anything formulaic and I do think that I have a naturally decent sense for colour. For me personally, it's important to explore colours and learn what works and what doesn't by hands-on experience because that's my best way to learn. It's a weak point, however, because I know that my composition on an overall piece could greatly improve by taking the time and care to work such things out beforehand.

Point being, I will definitely use this thread to look into people's suggestions.

 

 

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Guindy's answer is pretty much mine, too. 

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It depends on what I'm working on if I plan the colours out or if I super-plan them out. No, I joke. It's always super-planning time in this house ^_^!

 

I'll sit at the computer for days before I paint and work out every detail and every colour I'll use. Somehow, I found a big chart with all the paints I normally use so that I have the names and colours right with me all the time. (Let's not kid ourselves - who hasn't memorized the colour chart? Am I the only one who's memorized that thing :unsure:?) I'll save pictures from the model maker's website of every angle of each model so that I'll know what to expect when I'm planning it all out. After the photos are saved, I open them up and then get to making the paint scheme. Each overall paint scheme is formatted the same way and all the recipes are written out the same, too. It makes life much easier when flipping through them looking for a particular recipe to use with a new scheme. Trust me.

 

When it comes to making schemes work... I think it's innate with me. I started out painting with no help and little reference so there seems to be some in-born talent residing within me but hours, days, weeks, months, and years of painting and looking at helpful articles on the internet really helped the most. You know, I didn't realize that painting miniatures was so widespread when I started out - I never searched Google for forums or articles because I thought they didn't exist. Someone was wrong :lol:! If colour matching doesn't come naturally, learn how to use a colour wheel and go from there. They're fun little things. Truth be told, I just learned how to use one a month or so ago. When you search for one, look for the "Martian Colour Wheel". It seems to be the best one in regards to the option of tones for different colours.

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I use Army Painter color primers a lot. I'll come up with a base coat first. While it's sitting there drying I'll start thinking of other colors to compliment it. Sometimes it takes me awhile. I have a fire dragon right now primered in Chaotic Red. It's been that way for a few days. I'll also google pics to get color ideas and I look a lot at the inspiration gallery on the reaper main site. 

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I, uh, let the figure talk to me about what it would like to look like,

 

What?

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I Usually wing it, but if I need to figure something out I will sketch out a drawing of what I am painting and use my art program to fill in several different color schemes and go with what I like nest 

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On 2017-05-17 at 8:48 PM, Pingo said:

I, uh, let the figure talk to me about what it would like to look like,

 

What?

 

I have a similar arrangement with the demons that live in my head . . .

 

The Egg

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