Speak_Centurion

A tabletop/rpg type game for children?

14 posts in this topic

I've two nieces and a nephew aged about 7,8 and 9; normally they are very physically active but on a rainy day they do sometimes like to play indoors, so I'm looking for some kind of tabletop game to suit them. I was thinking of something along the lines of HeroQuest, but much simpler and more suited to young children (one boy, 7, and two girls). I haven't seen much to choose from so far; if I see the word "system" mentioned I instantly switch off, which is I suspect exactly the same reaction they would have; what I am looking for is a game that does not need to be learned, the game itself should guide the players; ie; you pick up a card and it tells you what you have to do.

 

It doesn't matter if the rule-system is good or logical, I think that's irrelevant to younger children, but there should be something for them to look at and hold in their hands; a game board, some cards, a couple of dice, and maybe some playing pieces. It should be visual and tactile. I don't play at all, but I'm starting to get the feeling that I'd have to invent the game myself. Surely there must be something out there already?

 

These are the kind of games I think would get their attention, but they seem to be only PDF's and rule systems: http://munchkinandbean.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/tabletop-role-playing-games-for-kids.html

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to take a look at FATE Core. It's more "guided storytelling" than role-playing game, which might be easier for kids to understand.

 

The latest episode of Tabletop shows it in action (with the designer as GM).

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Little Wizards by Crafty Games is one possibility.

 

I am currently running Pathfinder for a group of 9 year olds - I started with the Beginner's Box, but some of the kids already had characters generated using the full rules.

 

As for HeroQuest... my good lady started gaming with HeroQuest when she was a bit younger than 7 - so I would say try it before deciding the young folks won't get it.

 

If you have, or can dig up, a copy of the original Warhammer Quest, give that a try - I have, once upon a time, used it for an RPG for very young folks. It is amazing how quickly kids can learn to go 'Oh, oh!' when the wizard rolls a 1.

 

The Auld Grump

 

*EDIT* Megan claims that she was playing HeroQuest before ever she played Candyland or Chutes & Ladders. And her mother supports the claim. ::D:

Edited by TheAuldGrump
6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A set of Tabletop Rules called Toyhammer needs to become a thing. 

 

Kids already have collections of figures: action figures, Disney characters, sky landers, robots, playschool knights, odd chessmen, unicorns, dragons...  ...utilize them somehow. 

 

Basically, press gang toys the kids already have into little armies that battle with simple rules. 

 

Probably the number of figures per army should be the age of the kid + 2 (or so).

 

Movement would be based on either crayons or pencils or straws. Some easily obtainable object. The notion I had was:

Wings? = three pencil length move

Four footed? = two pencil length move

Two footed? = one pencil length move

 

One shared D6. Preferably one of those big 50-60mm jobs. 

 

Terrain, very simple. Blue craft foam = water (plus maybe two other colors?)

 

[...and that about exhausts the mental notes I had on the idea...]

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, TGP said:

A set of Tabletop Rules called Toyhammer needs to become a thing. 

...

 

It's called "Fuzzy Heroes" from Inner City Games Designs. (There are several versions depending on genre.)  No link because of board rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2017 at 6:31 AM, TheAuldGrump said:

As for HeroQuest... my good lady started gaming with HeroQuest when she was a bit younger than 7 - so I would say try it before deciding the young folks won't get it.

 

Yeah, I started playing HeroQuest and Space Crusade when I was 6 or 7, the rules aren't particularly complex. Roll two dice to move, in your turn you can move and do another action, roll skulls when you attack and shields when you defend. Pretty sure most kids that age should be able to deal with that.

Maybe consider trying to get a hold of Heroscape as well. As I recall it had rules for simple and advanced play.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/21/2017 at 2:48 PM, Doug Sundseth said:

 

It's called "Fuzzy Heroes" from Inner City Games Designs. (There are several versions depending on genre.)  No link because of board rules.

I took a look. 

It seemed like far more complicated-ness than I would be aiming at. 

 

Thinking a Kool-Aid and Oreos sorta game. (Like a Beer and Pretzels game but age appropriate for 4-11 ....?)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Dai-Mongar said:

Maybe consider trying to get a hold of Heroscape as well.

 

That would be my suggestion as well, if it were easy to acquire.  Putting the board together is like Legos which kept my nephews (around that age) quite entertained.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd be surprised at what kids can understand. I'm very tempted to take my X-Wing miniatures to my sister's house next time I have to babysit and get my 7 year old nephew playing with me. I'd probably play by the simplified rules that they use for the initial learn to play scenarios, where all that really matters is a ship's basic stats and the dice rolls, but that's enough to have a game. And then as he gets a better grasp of things, I can start introducing the new movement types, new actions, modification and item cards, etc.

 

You could also look at games like Zombie Dice. It's basically a push your luck style dice game. All that's needed is the ability to do addition and a piece of paper to track scores on.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/22/2017 at 1:28 AM, Speak_Centurion said:

I've two nieces and a nephew aged about 7,8 and 9; normally they are very physically active but on a rainy day they do sometimes like to play indoors, so I'm looking for some kind of tabletop game to suit them.

 

Some people have already posted some good RPG choices so I'll go in a different direction and ask - How often are you expecting a rainy day?

 

The reason I ask is that if you are looking for a tabletop game for an occasional play, a good board game might work really well.  Especially if you are looking for something tactile that the kids can touch and interact with, a board game will have all of this in the box so you don't have to spend any time on prep work (minis, terrain etc).

 

On the assumption you are looking for a board game, something like Talisman might be a good fit.  I loved Talisman when I was a kid as I loved the idea of going on a fantasy adventure with strange places to visit, monsters to encounter and powerful magic to cast!  The gameplay itself is super simple - basically roll a die, move your figure and then draw a card to see what you encounter.  In this regard, it would meet your needs of "pick up a card and it tells you what to do".

 

Lastly, if you are looking for a board game, the best place to look for advice on a good choice would be Board Game Geek (you prob know this already but I'm putting this here in case you don't!).

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They too old for No Thank You, Evil! ? Steve Jackson Games put that one out, and while it looks pretty simple on the surface, it also looks like it has the possibility for Depth (TM).

 

Granted, I've seen kids handle D&D without batting an eye, so my 'appropriate for a given age group' has some wild hiccups...

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Swords and Wizardry in the classroom, with premade characters, each corresponding to a type of figure. Third graders manage it just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While you did exclude Mermaid Adventures and Infestation from consideration by virtue of them being in your link above, I'll still go ahead and say that they were designed for children by Eloy Lasanta.  If you pick them up from Third Eye Games I believe they come with a coloring book.

 

A review for those interested

 

I have also heard that older children/young adults enjoy the Book of Cairn setting, which was kickstarted a few years back.  Also probably not what you are looking for, but it is at least a good excuse to make use of your Dark Sword anthropomorphic animals.  As it's on my to read list rather than my have read list I don't have any first hand knowledge so...

 

I googled up a review.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a kind of nice family game called Ryutama.  It's a fantasy setting and the players are, people going on a journey.  They are Farmers, Merchants, Craftsmen maybe a Princess.  Meanwhile the GM plays a sort of hidden guide and guardian who is collecting the story of their journey in order to feed the story to a dragon.

 

The game is mainly a shared world building experience, for example when you come to a new village the GM passes around a "village worksheet" and each player fills in one part of it, and then you explore the town you've created together.

 

There is some combat but it tends to be pretty simple, the focus of the game is the journey itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now