Froggy the Great

Randomness XII: Eighteen! Purple! Squirrels!

8658 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 The problem has nothing to do with what parents are willing to let their children read... A ratings system opens up the opportunity for censorship when WalMart and other stores refuse to sell "R-rated books" or insist they be edited before they'll sell them.

How many people are going to get exposed to The Lord Of The Rings or A Song Of Ice And Fire when they're stuck behind the counter at the register and you have to show ID before you can buy them?

How long before someone tries to pass a law enforcing their particular view of what's "appropriate" reading?

 

 

A ratings system has nothing to do with censorship, it's an "Advisory" for parents to become informed. I'm not saying bookstores need to police or enforce anything, but having a rating on it advising the purchaser on the content isn't a bad thing, it will only help busy parents.

 

I'm not a parent tho, so what the heck do I know other than nowadays kids seem to be less respectful than in generations past, crime is up, and discipline is down or nonexistent. I'm all for giving people the tools they need to become more informed, which is the absolute opposite end of censorship.

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The translators of the King James Bible used deliberately archaic language.  No one talked like that at the time.

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2 minutes ago, NebulousMissy said:

I ordered a pizza with pepperoni and olives. And cheese.

 

The pizza place forgot the cheese. I have bare pizza sauce with pepperoni and olives.

Mmmmm pizza.

 

BTW, I'm done with the previous topic. I'm going around in circles now and any further comments will probably land it in beekeepers. ::D:

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Just now, Pingo said:

The translators of the King James Bible used deliberately archaic language.  No one talked like that at the time.

They also changed our perspective on certain words. "Thou" was considered a more intimate form of address than "you," but because of its use in the Bible we now see it as more formal.

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1 minute ago, ub3r_n3rd said:

Mmmmm pizza.

 

BTW, I'm done with the previous topic. I'm going around in circles now and any further comments will probably land it in beekeepers. ::D:

 

Yes, but...

 

cheese...

 

Bah. I tossed on a few fistfuls of mozzarella I had in the fridge for just such emergencies. The pizza's still hot, I can wait for cheese to soften.

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When our kids were little our system was simple.  We wouldn't give them anything to read we hadn't read first.  Eventually we let them know anything in the bookcases in their rooms and the common rooms was fair game.   We kept scary or mature stuff, like back issues of "Miracleman", in bins in our bedroom.

 

Once they could get their hands on classroom books and their own stuff we were open to talking to them about any issues that came up.  Once in a great while we'd put our foot down and remove a book. We'd read them really good stuff at bedtime in the hopes that they'd eventually realize how much the popular kids' books they were reading were thin sauce.

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Pizza followup.

 

Tossing cheese on it and letting it melt sort of worked. It doesn't have the great toasty cooked cheese flavor. Instead it tastes of fridge cheese and olives. On the plus side I'm finding these occasional huge chunks of garlic I didn't order. I approve of unexpected garlic.

 

It appears this pizza place does not succeed at Build Your Own pizzas. If it's not explicitly on the menu it'll go weird.

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Dunno what is for dinner tonight, but the family is in the kitchen cookin' and it smells good!

 

I'm in my hobby room painting up a storm, almost done with a 4th figure! It's a VERY different figure than I've ever worked on before, a steampunk-ish dwarf from Cadwallon called a Forge Guardian. A LOT of tiny details on him.

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1 hour ago, ub3r_n3rd said:

Have the same type of advisory council do it that does it for movies and video games, then the publishers put the rating or advisory on the book. Simple enough.

 

You realize that ratings for movies have become more and more strict, right? It used to be that a PG movie could have swearing and sex jokes, just look at the original Ghostbusters. These days, if they were forced to re-rate it, it would be a PG-13 at lowest. Heck, Heavyweights, a Disney movie from the 90's, was rated PG and it had 12 year old kids saying "damn" in about half the scenes. Today, that wouldn't fly. And it's because the MPAA doesn't even follow their own guidelines on replacing their reviewers, so ratings are creeping more and more conservative as the years go by. Watch the documentary "This Film Is Not Yet Rated" sometime and see how asinine the ratings system can be. Not to mention the hypocrisy of the MPAA...

 

People seem to always want someone else to babysit their kids. If you do, fine, just don't try to screw up my enjoyment of things because you think little Timmy shouldn't be playing with lawn darts or that Boba Fett action figure with the missile launcher. But that's what ratings systems inevitably do. Because if a movie can't get a rating, it won't be shown in theaters. Which means it most likely won't get made if someone looks at the screenplay and says "yea, this isn't going to get a rating." Or at the very least it gets butchered and watered down from what it was supposed to be.

 

Recently, that almost happened with Deadpool. The director and actors, as well as the fans, had to push Fox to let it be made with an "R" rating, because Fox originally wanted to make it a PG-13 movie. PG-13 would have killed the movie, because half of the movie would have been chopped out and replaced with something lame. Because, historically, "R" rated movies haven't done as well as lower rated movies because of the whole restricted audience thing. So studios tend to limit "R" to stuff like horror movies that tend to have a rather limited audience regardless. Only after Deadpool came out and broke box office records did major studios start to look at an "R" as something that wasn't bad, and which could potentially add value to a movie by letting a movie do things that no other rating would.

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@Unruly - as I stated, I'm not going to talk about it anymore, I've said my peace and any further talk will land me in beekeepers, let's drop it and people can agree to disagree, please. Thank you.

 

Anyhow, trying to figure out a couple more bits and pieces and what colors to do on them right now on this little guy... he's got this little bit of what looks to be fire coming out of this exhaust vent or perhaps it's just smoke... If I paint it up as smoke I won't need to do any OSL on it...

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Posted (edited)

45 minutes ago, ub3r_n3rd said:

A ratings system has nothing to do with censorship, it's an "Advisory" for parents to become informed. I'm not saying bookstores need to police or enforce anything, but having a rating on it advising the purchaser on the content isn't a bad thing, it will only help busy parents.

 

I'm not a parent tho, so what the heck do I know other than nowadays kids seem to be less respectful than in generations past, crime is up, and discipline is down or nonexistent. I'm all for giving people the tools they need to become more informed, which is the absolute opposite end of censorship.

 

Ratings systems have always had something to do with censorship. That's the entire reason they were started. Movie ratings came about in the 60's, when parents started complaining about the content of movies(generally involving sexual content IIRC), and they were done so that the government would stop pushing for censorship. Parental Advisory stickers on music came about in the 80's because of parents complaining about sexual and "satanic" lyrics in heavy metal and trying to get the music censored. The Comics Code Authority was created in the 50's because of parents complaining about many of the same things in comics, and the government holding Congressional hearings regarding censoring comics. So yea, ratings have always had to do with censorship. They were the last bastion of freedom of speech in the face of impending censorship...

 

Edit: didn't see Uber's post, as I was typing this at the time. Consider this my last one.

Edited by Unruly
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Kids books these days are ridiculously well evaluated.  Most books have recommended age levels and grade levels.  I'm not trying to argue, like you said you don't have kids and therefore are unlikely to know how closely parents are told to monitor what they're reading.  Kids are supposed to read "just right" books that are optimal for their learning and it kinds sucks the fun out of it.  

 

Again, I'm not trying to start an argument, I just wanted Ub3r to know that book ratings are pretty much an already done deal.  

 

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1 hour ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 The problem has nothing to do with what parents are willing to let their children read... A ratings system opens up the opportunity for censorship when WalMart and other stores refuse to sell "R-rated books" or insist they be edited before they'll sell them.

How many people are going to get exposed to The Lord Of The Rings or A Song Of Ice And Fire when they're stuck behind the counter at the register and you have to show ID before you can buy them?

How long before someone tries to pass a law enforcing their particular view of what's "appropriate" reading?

 

 

 

  • I'm opposed to a mandatory rating system for anything, but I'd be just fine with voluntary rating systems, even printed on boxes. If you want guidance, talk to your advisor, but don't make me talk to (or satisfy) somebody just because you think his opinions are just wonderful.
  • It's not censorship if I refuse to carry something in my store* for whatever reason. Don't like it, don't buy at my store.

* NB: I don't have a store.

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Mmmmm! Breakfast for dinner tonight!

 

Waffles and bacon and sausage! :wub: 

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13 minutes ago, ub3r_n3rd said:

Mmmmm! Breakfast for dinner tonight!

 

Waffles and bacon and sausage! :wub: 

 

Sounds like sunday dinner at grandma's house. Ah, childhood.

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