Froggy the Great

Randomness XII: Eighteen! Purple! Squirrels!

5936 posts in this topic

 

19 minutes ago, Thes Hunter said:

 

5 hours ago, NebulousMissy said:

I wrote my bachelor's thesis on how to find aliens. I got stories.

 

Most of it was sighing at vague data, looking at possible models, swearing at 'goldilocks zone' oversimplifications (Earth is NOT in the Sun's 'goldilocks zone by temperature! Venus is!), and realizing most people are really unimaginative when it comes to what might support life.

 

So so are you applying for that NASA job? :lol: 

 

I am not applying for the NASA job. Not sure I would right now, I have a cousin working for NASA who's under a gag order because of politics. 

 

23 minutes ago, Thes Hunter said:

 

5 hours ago, NebulousMissy said:

 

The problem is oxygen gives a big fat signal with even tiny amounts. With our current and upcoming technology it won't matter if the sample has 20%, 2%, or 200 molecules, it'll look like the same curve. It's essentially a Y/N question rather than a refined 'so how much?' question.

 

 

I perfer my FIO2 at 21%. But it makes me wonder what the Partida pressure of oxygen is at sea level at 20%, and what difference in altitude would we be potentionally subject to high altitude sickness. Would an atmosphere at 20% drastically reduce our habitable zone?

 

We have 21% oxygen. People routinely survive on half that, they tend to be climbing mountains ::P: I mean, mammals evolved diaphragms to deal with a low-oxygen mass extinction, Earth's O2 has had some pretty major dips in the past.

 

The human body needs one third of an atmosphere of pressure on its skin to keep its insides inside. Other than that we're pretty versatile. I've heard humans described as 'space orcs' due to our physical adaptability.

 

29 minutes ago, Thes Hunter said:

 

4 hours ago, NebulousMissy said:

From what I heard of the story, there was no water left in the pool afterwards. This might have been hyperbole.

 

I don't know if Prankster Who Severely Underestimated Size Of Boom ever got caught. I do know they, ah, did not complete their intended program, instead earning a Masters in Biochemistry as a consolation prize.

 

So you dont don't know if he was caught.... but you know he did not get his intended degree. Was this because it was suspected but not formerly charged? 

 

The consolation prize was because a kid happened. As far as I know they would have gone completely unknown had they not bragged to the AP Chemistry class they were teaching. I think it was supposed to be a cautionary tale? Still came out as bragging.

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20 minutes ago, knarthex said:

 

4 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

If you drop sodium in water, which one catches fire? ^_^

 

Hint: The answer is mostly, "Ummmm".

The answer is just plain neither, as it is just a chemical reaction producing excess heat....

 

Fire is just an exothermic redox reaction that produces enough excess heat to break air into a plasma.

 

Sodium is being oxidized in a violent manner, therefore the sodium is burning.

 

Remember kids, LEO says GER. Lose Electrons, Oxidation. Gain Electrons, Reduction.

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

WHAT IF ALLIGATORS?!

 

The awkward moment when this sentence no verb.

 

25 minutes ago, Werkrobotwerk said:

I think of him as more of a burrito

 

Okay I laughed way too hard at this. :lol:

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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38 minutes ago, NebulousMissy said:

 

Fire is just an exothermic redox reaction that produces enough excess heat to break air into a plasma.

 

Sodium is being oxidized in a violent manner, therefore the sodium is burning.

 

Remember kids, LEO says GER. Lose Electrons, Oxidation. Gain Electrons, Reduction.

 

Fire is just an exothermic redox reaction that produces enough excess heat to break air into a plasma. Water is being reduced in a violent manner, therefore the water is burning.

 

It's all in where you sit. :rolleyes: 

 

@knarthex: Typically we consider the reducer to be the thing that is burning, but that's just a semantic issue. Largely I think that's because the reducer is more likely to be a solid or liquid while the oxidizer is more likely to be a gas in the kinds of reactions people see most often. If you have a fire using gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen, most people will consider the oxy to be the thing that is burning. But you have to have both oxydizer and reducer for "fire".

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52 minutes ago, OneBoot said:

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

*** Raises eyebrows ***

Lady Brush Spartan?

*** Nods sagely ***

I like it!

 

*** Picks up the Randomness Column of the Reaper News ***

*** Pages through endoexegitcal randomitriousus ***

*** Frowns and looks for... ***

Aha!

PurpleSquirrel.jpg.b85be83ef5d2bc2be858197bd5fd2721.jpg

*** Sits back and enjoys the comics page ***

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2 hours ago, Thes Hunter said:

I think part of my problem with painting quick skeletons is that I try to do both of the seemingly dominate techniques, one after another. I think I need to remember I'm not satified with the way dry brushing looks and that I need to do the light to dark with washes and highlighting.

 

(FYI. What I've found to be the two dominant methods are:

1) prime black, dry brush one or two lighter colors

2) base coat in a light color, shade with a wash, put back in the highlights with one or two colors.

 

 

 

 

Quite awhile ago I bought a GW Tomb Kings army. About 100 skeletons. Love skeletons. Thought it's be easy to paint them all. Read about "dipping" using wood stain. Thought oh ya this'll be great. Assembled most of them because I actually like assembling multipart plastic models.Primed them with sort of a butternut coloured spray paint because it was the closest thing I could find to a bone colour. So dipping is basically grab a mini by the base with pliers and dunk it into the wood stain and shake off the excess. Did about 40 skeletons until my wrist started to hurt. Did the dry brush up to bone highlights and added the few bits of extra colour. My wrist hurt for days and days. The skellies are more of a medium brown than bone. Didn't like the colour, didn't like the method and other than those 40 they are still sitting there unpainted. I've done many other skeletons since then but just never want to tackle that army.

 

Nowadays I do some version of #2. I've never been a fan of black priming unless I want a really dark overall look. It's so hard to cover. I sometimes do grey but more often than not white. I prefer to use washes to shade down rather than highlight up.

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Good evening board gaming! I like board game nights. It's social interaction with rules. 

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9 minutes ago, Grayfax said:

 

*** Raises eyebrows ***

Lady Brush Spartan?

*** Nods sagely ***

I like it!

 

*** Picks up the Randomness Column of the Reaper News ***

*** Pages through endoexegitcal randomitriousus ***

*** Frowns and looks for... ***

Aha!

PurpleSquirrel.jpg.b85be83ef5d2bc2be858197bd5fd2721.jpg

*** Sits back and enjoys the comics page ***

But that's only one. Where are the others?

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@knarthex To continue the lecture ::P:

 

Take wood, for example. Cellulose strands are reduced by oxygen (guess how 'oxidizer' became a word) to produce water and carbon dioxide as waste products:

 

C6H12O6 + 6O2 --> 6CO2 + 6H2O

 

As you can see this is a highly oxygen intensive process. Astute observers will also recognize this as the basic reaction our cells use to extract energy from food.

 

Sitting around the fire, you observe the wood 'burning' in that it's engulfed in flames which slowly deconstruct the wood as it gets turned into ash and sparks and the heat for hot dogs. That's because when uncontrolled, such as in a fire pit, this reaction produces hilarious amounts of heat, on the order of 2800 kilojoules per mole. We'll continue to call it 'hilarious amounts'. These hilarious amounts of heat crack the oxygen in the air, enabling it to be used in the reaction. However, it also cracks everything else in the air and many things in the wood. Molecular bonds shatter all over the place, electrons flying free in searing plasma that we use for hot dogs and marshmallows.

 

This hilarious amount of heat is enough that to explain fire we do need to leave pure chemistry and touch on physics. Things that have heat glow with a Black Body Spectrum. I don't want to even try formatting the equations here so I'll stick to concepts. The hotter something is the more light it puts out. But the hotter something is the bluer that light will be overall. That's why the base of a fire where the reaction between wood and oxygen is taking place is brightest and often blue or at least bright yellow/white. As you move away from the reaction site the plasma cools and turns orange then red then fades out of sight, though it's still giving off plenty of light in the IR. Light in the IR is often described as 'heat'.

 

Therefore, it might not be the oxidizer or the reducer that's truly burning. Depending on what you describe as 'burning' the answer might be EVERYTHING. :;,;:

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Fire is just an exothermic redox reaction that produces enough excess heat to break air into a plasma. Water is being reduced in a violent manner, therefore the water is burning.

 

It's all in where you sit. :rolleyes: 

 

@knarthex: Typically we consider the reducer to be the thing that is burning, but that's just a semantic issue. Largely I think that's because the reducer is more likely to be a solid or liquid while the oxidizer is more likely to be a gas in the kinds of reactions people see most often. If you have a fire using gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen, most people will consider the oxy to be the thing that is burning. But you have to have both oxydizer and reducer for "fire".

don't forget the turbulence needed for fire!

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I am planning a robot crab knife fight...

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Visiting my dad's house and the OK panhandle is having one massive electrical storm, with the possibility of 2" hail. Car is under a massive pine tree for protection. 

 

Oh, and I forgot to bring my glasses. Debating trying to sleep in contacts or just go without focus for the night. 

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19 minutes ago, Werkrobotwerk said:

I am planning a robot crab knife fight...

 

Of course. Isn't everyone?

 

Btw, do you write for Inspirobot?

 

:rolleyes:

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4 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Of course. Isn't everyone?

 

Btw, do you write for Inspirobot?

 

:rolleyes:

Nope. Just giving robots shivs in preparation for a very silly diorama. 

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Posted (edited)

I am no longer broccoli colored, I'm now lime colored.

Edited by Thes Hunter
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