Froggy the Great

Randomness XII: Eighteen! Purple! Squirrels!

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@Mad Jack liked for your storytelling skills, not the construction. 

 

 

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So I found a website that lets me make wishlists for minis and then put in what I have in my collection already. This could be dangerous for me. So much want.

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Posted (edited)

52 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

 

   Pfft... I know what's going on in the walls - I've torn enough of them out over the years for plumbing repairs and water damage. The wiring is a nightmare to figure out - the switch for the ceiling lights in the rec room is right by the door from upstairs - except for the one light directly over the door, which the old man put in later, which is turned on by the switch near the heater room door, all the way across the room... :rolleyes:

The electrical stuff on the front wall of the kitchen is on a different fuse in the fusebox than the rest of the kitchen, there's an electrical outlet in the foyer about ten feet over the door to the downstairs (that's impossible to reach without a ladder) because we used to hang Christmas decorations there (and the outlet was a compromise after my mother refused to let the old man run his big orange extension cord up the wall), and down in the heater room the water pump has its own switch on the wall next to it, with the wiring running right out of the wall from the switchbox to the pump. Later, the old man decided we needed more electrical outlets in there, so he cut the wiring and spliced in an outlet box, that now just hangs in midair halfway between the wall and the pump.

  For some project whose intentions I've never actually been clear on, my old man nailed several horizontal sections of 2x4 inbetween the studs in the unfinished wall of the heater room. About a year afterward, I went looking for my chainmail mill that I use to wrap the wire to make the links. I found it - it was what he had cut up and built into the wall...

  The plumbing wanders all over the damn place because my father misjudged things when he installed it and so solved the problem by putting in little detours around other things. The thermostat box on the furnace, rather than being attached and properly screwed into place, is wired in position using about 20 ft. of my 22-ga. hobby wire wrapped around all the nearby pipes.  This is because, when we replaced the electrical box on the furnace the last time, and changed some leaky pipes, the old man forgot to take the size of the thermostat box into account when rebuilding the plumbing and put a pipe too close to where it was supposed to go so it wouldn't screw in right (and thus the thermostat wouldn't read the right temperature). And so, rather than go through all the "trouble" of redoing the job right and having to resolder all those joints on the pipes, the thermostat box looks like it got attacked and eaten by a giant mechanical spider.

 

There have been times my father has had to replace a part on something, said, "Oh, I've got one of these in the garage...", and gone and dug out the same damn part that was on the thing before the one that just broke... Because somehow, that part that was broken when you took it off twenty years ago and replaced it with the part that just broke has somehow managed to fix itself in the two decades since you had to replace it...:rolleyes:

 

 As I'm sure you can figure out, having lived with this kind of crap my whole life is the root of my almost compulsive precision and accuracy and tendency to overbuild things to the point of indestructibility when working on a project.

 

 

Reading this, the term "fire trap" kept echoing through my head.

Don't they require building inspections in your part of the country?  In my part of the country they won't issue a certificate of occupancy without signed off inspections.  Without a valid certificate of occupancy you can forget about trying to sell a residential property, obtain a mortgage, or get property insurance.

I feel your frustration.

GEM

Read Aryanun,s response after posting mine.  Now I know where that little voice I kept hearing was coming from.

Edited by Green Eyed Monster
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3 hours ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

That is a lot to deal with. ::(:

Mad Jack is blessed to have friends here that he can share his burdens with.

GEM

Oh no, you misunderstand. Jack doesn't have "friends." Jack has an audience, and hecklers. Friends are good, but we're entertainment

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23 minutes ago, SparrowMarie said:

So I found a website that lets me make wishlists for minis and then put in what I have in my collection already. This could be dangerous for me. So much want.

Would you be willing to share that site? =)

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3 minutes ago, ShadowRaven said:

Oh no, you misunderstand. Jack doesn't have "friends." Jack has an audience, and hecklers. Friends are good, but we're entertainment

GLEEP! :unsure::blink::wacko:

 

Mad Jack does tell a good story.  I think I know where the Mad part comes from.

GEM

 

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Sounds like my house. Everything in my house was grandfathered in because the house was built in the 50's when building codes basically didn't exist here. Which is also why if I ever do anything to the house, I'm gonna be trying my best to hire people who know what they're doing. My biggest fear is that I'm going to run into knob and tube wiring, which is basically a death sentence for a home, because in a lot of places you're required to strip it all out and rewire everything if it's found during an improvement project.

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1 minute ago, Unruly said:

Sounds like my house. Everything in my house was grandfathered in because the house was built in the 50's when building codes basically didn't exist here. Which is also why if I ever do anything to the house, I'm gonna be trying my best to hire people who know what they're doing. My biggest fear is that I'm going to run into knob and tube wiring, which is basically a death sentence for a home, because in a lot of places you're required to strip it all out and rewire everything if it's found during an improvement project.

I spent most of my youth in a house that was originally wired with knob and tube wiring.

My father, being a Master Millwright, stripped out the main fuse panel and most of the wiring and replaced it with a new 200amp main service and all new wiring.  Left the old stuff in the walls and just ran all new wire, new outlets, new switches, new fixture boxes.  He insisted on doing this before we even moved in. This was circa 1957.

That was the first of many remodeling projects on that property.  Learned a lot about construction growing up, thanks Dad.

GEM

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18 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

 

Reading this, the term "fire trap" kept echoing through my head.

Don't they require building inspections in your part of the country?  In my part of the country they won't issue a certificate of occupancy without signed off inspections.  Without a valid certificate of occupancy you can forget about trying to sell a residential property, obtain a mortgage, or get property insurance.

I feel your frustration.

GEM

Read Aryanun,s response after posting mine.  Now I know where that little voice I kept hearing was coming from.

 

You're in and/or near California.

 

California burns down. California dumps houses off of hillsides for fun. California has 200 year floods that fill the central valley like a giant lake. California lost all its major cities a couple of times due to the ground deciding to shake like a wet dog. California earned its building codes the hard way. Much of the rest of the country... has not earned. Or learned. Or even thought about it.

 

I grew up in LA. When my parents remodeled the house they installed so many brackets holding joints and doorways together that cell phones won't work inside. When I moved out here to Philly I was so unnerved by the lack of proper construction I could just see on buildings. There are no transverse beams anywhere, random bricks are just sort of mortared in, floor slabs don't extend all the way to the outer walls, hurricane clips are a myth, foundations just sit there, it's still unnerving. I have to remind myself that earthquakes aren't a thing here, Philadelphia never shook itself down or burned down or slid down a mountain or nuthin'.

 

California has building codes and inspectors and safety things because California is hardcore.

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1 hour ago, Aryanun said:

 

This is a pattern of his father. Always late and just cobbling things together as "good enough" instead of doing it right in the first place.

 

 

I fear that house.  No telling what's going on in the walls there.

In some ways, it reminds me of the house my ex's father built. He found a lot of extremely creative solutions to building problems he ran into... When he started really feeling the effects of ALS, he wrote an instruction manual for the house. It was needed. Some of the secret compartments were really not obvious. It's also probably worth mentioning that this is the same man who had not one, but TWO wooden tractors. But the crazy part about all his stuff is that while it was almost all unconventional, it was all well designed and built and worked remarkably well. So in that way it's completely unlike Mad Jack's house. ::):

 

And I don't think I've shared my plan for my son's Christmas present! He's really interested in playing Dragon Rampant (when I asked if he was still interested he nodded so hard and fast I thought he was going to hurt himself) so I've asked him to pick out a theme for his army, figure out what units he wants, then we'll order in the appropriate minis and I'll paint them up for Christmas. And in the meantime, I'm also going to paint up a bunch of other stuff so we have a choice of other units to use for the opposing army. I'm planning an undead army, a pretty generic human army, and then I'm not sure what else. It's gonna be a bit of a rush job to get this stuff ready on time, but he's over the moon with excitement and can't make up what he wants because he's having too much fun looking at options. Which means this is going to be a pretty great Christmas present. ::):

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3 minutes ago, NebulousMissy said:

 

You're in and/or near California.

 

California burns down. California dumps houses off of hillsides for fun. California has 200 year floods that fill the central valley like a giant lake. California lost all its major cities a couple of times due to the ground deciding to shake like a wet dog. California earned its building codes the hard way. Much of the rest of the country... has not earned. Or learned. Or even thought about it.

 

I grew up in LA. When my parents remodeled the house they installed so many brackets holding joints and doorways together that cell phones won't work inside. When I moved out here to Philly I was so unnerved by the lack of proper construction I could just see on buildings. There are no transverse beams anywhere, random bricks are just sort of mortared in, floor slabs don't extend all the way to the outer walls, hurricane clips are a myth, foundations just sit there, it's still unnerving. I have to remind myself that earthquakes aren't a thing here, Philadelphia never shook itself down or burned down or slid down a mountain or nuthin'.

 

California has building codes and inspectors and safety things because California is hardcore.

 

As a fellow expat, I feel your unease. It doesn’t help that the most powerful earthquake to ever strike the US had its epicenter in Missouri. :mellow:

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1 minute ago, Sophie was taken said:

 

As a fellow expat, I feel your unease. It doesn’t help that the most powerful earthquake to ever strike the US had its epicenter in Missouri. :mellow:

 

Ah, New Madrid. And the geology of the eastern half of the US meant the entire half of the continent shook like a giant jello.

 

It's like this half of the country doesn't believe in bedrock. Weird.

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9 minutes ago, NebulousMissy said:

 

You're in and/or near California.

 

California burns down. California dumps houses off of hillsides for fun. California has 200 year floods that fill the central valley like a giant lake. California lost all its major cities a couple of times due to the ground deciding to shake like a wet dog. California earned its building codes the hard way. Much of the rest of the country... has not earned. Or learned. Or even thought about it.

 

I grew up in LA. When my parents remodeled the house they installed so many brackets holding joints and doorways together that cell phones won't work inside. When I moved out here to Philly I was so unnerved by the lack of proper construction I could just see on buildings. There are no transverse beams anywhere, random bricks are just sort of mortared in, floor slabs don't extend all the way to the outer walls, hurricane clips are a myth, foundations just sit there, it's still unnerving. I have to remind myself that earthquakes aren't a thing here, Philadelphia never shook itself down or burned down or slid down a mountain or nuthin'.

 

California has building codes and inspectors and safety things because California is hardcore.

 

^^ I grew up in CA. This is all true. 

 

You don't put a bed underneath a window, or hang framed pictures over beds in CA. That took getting used to in CO. In CA, you want your resting place away from potential broken glass. You keep a trash can full of canned goods ready, in case an earthquake hits and all power goes out for a long time. And if you simultaneously live on a fault line and next to train tracks, you can tell the train from the quake because the train goes "toot toot". Small quakes are just... common. 

 

CA burns. The central valley floods. 

 

But y'know what? It doesn't get hurricanes. 

1 minute ago, NebulousMissy said:

 

Ah, New Madrid. And the geology of the eastern half of the US meant the entire half of the continent shook like a giant jello.

 

It's like this half of the country doesn't believe in bedrock. Weird.

 

"Bedrock" Is so.... generic of a term. But as far as the hard rock under-layer goes? Yeah. There is a heck of a lot of sediment out there. Even the Denver basin has ~1km of shale I believe. I'm not a sedimentologist, and my courses have focused on the western side. But the east? All that is old rock and the dead remains of the old rock. 

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5 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

^^ I grew up in CA. This is all true. 

 

You don't put a bed underneath a window, or hang framed pictures over beds in CA. That took getting used to in CO. In CA, you want your resting place away from potential broken glass. You keep a trash can full of canned goods ready, in case an earthquake hits and all power goes out for a long time. And if you simultaneously live on a fault line and next to train tracks, you can tell the train from the quake because the train goes "toot toot". Small quakes are just... common. 

 

CA burns. The central valley floods. 

 

But y'know what? It doesn't get hurricanes. 

 

"Bedrock" Is so.... generic of a term. But as far as the hard rock under-layer goes? Yeah. There is a heck of a lot of sediment out there. Even the Denver basin has ~1km of shale I believe. I'm not a sedimentologist, and my courses have focused on the western side. But the east? All that is old rock and the dead remains of the old rock. 

Rock never dies!

It may not age well, but its always Rock!

Bang your head with me now, and mosh it up!

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I think I may have killed my character tonight :zombie: My doll made kinda goes nuts when her dolls are in danger. So one of them was in danger, she did a running tackle on the guy and they both fell into the hell portal behind him. I don't know what happened to her :wow:

 

 

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