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Jordan Peacock

Secret Weapon Miniatures - Tablescapes, Fallout Style

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Progress on the car wrecks:

 

junked__cars__cars_by_jordangreywolf-dbh

 

No doubt I'd get better rust effects if I used some sort of weathering powder, but for now I just spackle-painted a bunch of stuff.  I used a dark pumpkin orange to trace areas that were supposed to be trim, splattered some grey mix wash onto the cars, dabbled on some more wash, spattered with black paint, mixed some black with the pumpkin orange to get a super-dark "rust" area, then did more "spackling" with the resulting dark brown, the lighter pumpkin orange, and a few specks of golden-tan, with a lot of back and forth.  In retrospect, I really should have just base-coated all of the cars; the shiny, un-scuffed original plastic looked too much at odds with the rusty grunge, where it peeked through.  "Doc" is in the foreground on the left, "Flo" is on the right, and "Luigi" (which was later in my efforts -- and I decided to spray THAT one with Rustoleum rather than leaving it shiny banana yellow) is in the back.

 

"Luigi" is noticeably out of scale when placed next to a 32mm scale mini -- too large of a car for the mini.  I really should have figured as much, as Luigi is supposed to be a small car, but these are Happy Meal toys, and some kid would surely feel cheated if he got a toy that was clearly half the size of any of the other cars, right?  So while it's still visibly shorter, it's far TALLER than the other cars.  I think a Super Mutant might be able to drive this thing -- or at least cram into the driver's seat, hunch over the wheel, and make "Vroom-VROOM!" noises to his heart's content.

 

I still haven't found a suitable solution for the windshield/roof of the "Ramone" cars, which is pretty sad.  "Ramone" is (like Luigi) based on a 1959 model of car, so a little bit late-era for the Fallout look, but "Ramone" still has those diagonal FINS that really drive home that retro aspect.  With some sort of bubble-dome cockpit, I think it'd be perfect.  I'm half-tempted to get out a hair dryer and see if I can experiment with blister plastic to get it to curl.  Even if the end result ends up looking misshapen and molten, it might not be out of place for a post-apocalyptic car wreck.

Edited by Jordan Peacock
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Here's a figure-next-to-car picture for some scale context with a "Child of Atom" that I kit-bashed out of an old "Vor: The Maelstrom" (40-403 Neo-Soviet Officer) miniature and some putty and scrap.

 

fallout_child_of_atom_by_jordangreywolf-

 

The terrain is an old, OLD terrain piece from ages ago, where I first experimented with pouring resin for water effects, discovered that anything shy of several coats of house-paint latex is insufficient to protect foam-board terrain from doing horrible things when you pour clear casting resin over it, and also discovered that the dratted stuff is going to be a dust magnet and stay tacky FOREVER.  (Or, at least, it hasn't stopped being tacky and disgusting *yet*.)  Oh yeah, and what was once clear ends up turning dirty-yellow over time.  But, hey, for a post-apocalyptic sludgy stream bed?  It works just fine for that.

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Cool project. I like how you created the details for car and truck parts using the old toys. Keep up the great work!

Edited by OneBoot
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I put the "Ramone" cars on the back burner, as I had no ready access to some sort of suitable replacement for the roof, and I didn't trust that I could get a decent result by trying to Dremel out the "windows" and end up with something that didn't look ... well ... Dremeled out.  I considered the possibility of turning both cars into convertibles, with a replacement windshield made of blister plastic, but another thing that bugged me was that so far my car wrecks just look OLD, not "retrofuturistic."  (Okay, so maybe "Flo" looks a bit retrofuturistic, but that's just one.)  What if I could replace the roof with some sort of a dome top?  That might evoke more of a "Jetsons" or "Lincoln Futura" feel.  The trick is in finding a plastic dome of suitable diameter and depth (a total half-sphere would look silly) to do the job.

 

While at Sci-Fi City and checking on an order of Cockatrices (and informing the manager that I'd heard from someone at Reaper that, no, they ARE NOT discontinuing their pewter minis, and still in fact make them), I noticed a few "gumball" style dispensers of junky little toys.  Among them was a "Zombie Nation" dispenser that offered ~2" plastic "acorn"-style prize capsules ... oh, and also some random ugly zombie mini inside each one.

 

After a bit of wrestling with the machine to get it to actually dispense my paid-for "prize," I managed to get two capsules.

 

21122367_10212011911325628_2221695966948

 

The 2"-diameter dome is not only a bit too wide for the car, but it's certainly too tall.  A 40mm round base (pictured atop the purple car to the left) is much closer to the diameter I was hoping for.  But in this case, "too big" is definitely better than "too small."

 

 

 

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21013848_10212011911285627_2410049573506

 

I fit the 40mm round base inside the capsule dome, then took advantage of the translucence of the dome to trace a line around the rim, serving as a cutting guideline.  I them used the Dremel cutting wheel attachment to work my way around the edge (a bit cautious, since I was afraid of making the thin plastic crack, or cutting too far inward).  I then did some clean-up of the "crumbs" and "threads" of distressed plastic along the rim (shown on left).  I'll try to figure out a use for the remaining semi-cylinder shape later on.

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20988983_10212011911245626_1834976240426

 

To make room for the new dome top, I used the Dremel cutter to remove the roof from the "Ramone" car, revealing the mechanism inside. I'm leaving the mechanism in place, since the "frosted" look of the plastic dome doesn't make it all that visible anyway, but I opted to cut off the two vertical tabs inside (since they were too much at odds with the idea of a driver and passenger seat being somewhere under the dome).  

 

16998777_10212011912485657_4510896950198

 

I'm a bit nervous any time I get out the Dremel, because "The Dremel can be your friend ... and the Dremel can be YOUR WORST ENEMY."  Fortunately, I didn't have any incidents with the Dremel trying to break loose and go on a grinding spree or other such silliness, nor did I have random plastic cracks.  After I took the photo, I went back and shortened those two vertical tabs, since they were visible through the dome as clearly interfering with space where there really ought to be driver and passenger seats instead.

 

As can be seen (and as should be expected), the ROUND edge of a dome isn't going to match up perfectly with the somewhat more square-like base of the roof.  Some gap-filling is in order.  That's where the putty comes in.

 

 

Edited by Jordan Peacock
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21015950_10212011912685662_8253504404795

 

And here's where I had to leave off early this morning.  I started applying some epoxy putty as gap-filler, but I didn't want to apply things too thickly at first: I want the initial bits of putty to cure a bit so they can serve as structural support (rather than bowing in under pressure from applying more putty on top of that), so I can apply a bit more in the evening, and then try to smooth things out some more.  I used some leftover bits of putty to turn the front tires into "flats."  I'll use some more to freeze the wheels in place (no sense in a junked car rolling across the table on its own), and to turn the rear tires into "flats" as well.

 

For the paint job, I'd like to preserve as much of the original paint job (particularly the "flames" and "pin-stripe" details) since they look interesting, but since this is supposed to be a post-apocalyptic junker, I'll also be adding some "grunge" and "rust spots" and such.  Since I am unlikely to be able to make a smooth transition from the original yellow to get a perfect match painted onto the areas of putty, there will probably be a lot of grunge and rust accumulating in my paint scheme near the base of where the dome attaches.

 

Once I get that done (but before I glue the dome down in place), I'll try doing the same to the other "Ramone" car (the purple one).  I'd like to have the loose dome on hand to serve to double-check the size of the second dome bubble top I cut out, since I'd like both of them to be as similar as possible.  After all, both of these should represent the same model of car -- just different paint jobs.

 

 

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Here's an update on the "Ramone" conversion, along with some more Tablescapes "Urban Streets" tiles:

showdown_at_the_frosty_bar_by_jordangrey

 

The sidewalk tiles and foreground pavement are Secret Weapon Miniatures "Tablescapes" tiles.  Two converted Happy Meal "Ramone" cars with bubble tops are in the foreground.  The "Frosty Bar" is a Bachmann Plasticville O-scale model kit.

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