edz16

wet pallette issues

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Hello all.  I have a problem with my wet palette I hope someone can help with.  I am using the Masterson sta-wet palette with normal parchment paper from the grocery store.  If I leave my palette open for a couple of hours the paper begins to peel off the sponge and is impossible to keep wet and flat.  Anyone else have this problem or know a fix?

 

thanks!

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The process I use (which gets me wet paper in semi-arid Denver for at least 7 hours) is:

  • Put water in the palette and put the paper under the sponge. Wait for 15 minutes or so. (I only have to do this every few weeks, so it's the first thing I do when I'm setting up for the day that I'm changing paper.)
  • Flip paper and sponge over. (Now the paper is wet through and flat, because it's been under the sponge.)
  • Fill the water up to very near the top of the sponge, At times the paper will almost float off the sponge.

I have had that curling thing when I use a different process, but I don't know whether it's because part of the paper isn't saturated with water or the water in the palette isn't high enough.

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Corporea showed me a cool tip - fold a couple of pieces of paper towel and put that in between the paper and the sponge. (I cut mine to fit so there's no bumps or lumps.) Seems to keep the towel more evenly moist.

Even in the humid south, I have to add water to my wet palette during a long painting session. A wet palette needs to be wet, there should be a quarter inch or more of water sloshing around the edges of your sponge.

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I once worked with a self-made wet palette and the paper never stayed flat, so I gave up pretty quickly (probably my selfmade palette was just ... rubbish...).

 

Now I recently came across a forum-thread on Beasts of War where I read an announcement about an upcoming wet-palette kickstarter at the end of this month.. with reusable membrane.

http://www.redgrassgames.com/

Might be worth keeping an eye on it...

I still have my doubts though, but I may give it a go...

 

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, TheBucklandBrewer said:

I once worked with a self-made wet palette and the paper never stayed flat, so I gave up pretty quickly (probably my selfmade palette was just ... rubbish...).

 

Now I recently came across a forum-thread on Beasts of War where I read an announcement about an upcoming wet-palette kickstarter at the end of this month.. with reusable membrane.

http://www.redgrassgames.com/

Might be worth keeping an eye on it...

I still have my doubts though, but I may give it a go...

 

 

 

I've seen that one. I'm super skeptical of it. It dinged my radar of "fancy gadget" which means It may be to cool and be a flop. HAHA! 

Edited by Arc 724
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Put the lid on it when not using it?  When I step away I just put the top on, even if it is not completely sealed, it does help with evaporation.  I also sometimes use small weights, like figures or bases to hold the corners of the paper down until it gets wet. 

 

I don't recommend paper towels.  I used my last sponge (they disintegrate after a while) and stuck a folded towel under the paper as a substitute and it quickly turned into a science fair project.  

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23 minutes ago, Inarah said:

Put the lid on it when not using it?  When I step away I just put the top on, even if it is not completely sealed, it does help with evaporation.  I also sometimes use small weights, like figures or bases to hold the corners of the paper down until it gets wet. 

 

I don't recommend paper towels.  I used my last sponge (they disintegrate after a while) and stuck a folded towel under the paper as a substitute and it quickly turned into a science fair project.  

 

Definitely agree about using the top.

 

Putting the parchment under the sponge/paper towel for 15 minutes or so keeps it flat until the curve relaxes. You do have to remember to change out the paper before you're actually ready to paint, though.

 

The yellow sponge from the Masterson palette makes it a bit tricky to see the colors of the paints at times, which was the original reason I switched away from it. But I also throw away the paper towels whenever I change parchment. I use exclusively paper towels now and I haven't had a mold problem since I started that.

 

YMMV.

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I change out the paper towel between my sponge and parchment now and again. I also have a couple of older pennies under my sponge for the antimicrobial properties of copper. If I leave it closed with water in for a period of a week or more I'll get some minor issues (and need to toss the paper towel), but if I clean things up after use and let them dry out now and again, it all seems to work fine. If anything, when I do get some slime it's on the paper towel and hopefully my sponge will last a little longer, but it's early days in the lifespan of this sponge, so hard to tell. The paper towel can also help cover up the yellow of the Masterson's sponge, though I had gotten annoyed enough by that to order some white compressed sponge off eBay before learning Corporea's tip.

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16 hours ago, TheBucklandBrewer said:

I once worked with a self-made wet palette and the paper never stayed flat, so I gave up pretty quickly (probably my selfmade palette was just ... rubbish...).

 

Now I recently came across a forum-thread on Beasts of War where I read an announcement about an upcoming wet-palette kickstarter at the end of this month.. with reusable membrane.

http://www.redgrassgames.com/

Might be worth keeping an eye on it...

I still have my doubts though, but I may give it a go...

 

 

Looks interesting.  Wonder what the cost will be.

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thanks for all the ideas.  Just a fyi, heres what my pallette looks like after about 2 hours of constant use.  This was a brand new paper.

20170805_184957043_iOS.jpg

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Looks like there's just not enough water in the sponge to keep the paper wet. 

 

You could also try using a smaller piece of paper.  Won't need as much water.

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Mine does the same thing. In my office I keep the fan on which doesnt help. My solution, about every hour, put a little more water in it. I know I'm going to get up anyway so just make that another thing to do while up.

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On 8/5/2017 at 4:05 PM, edz16 said:

thanks for all the ideas.  Just a fyi, heres what my pallette looks like after about 2 hours of constant use.  This was a brand new paper.

If it helps any, I've seen the same thing.  (In the end, I took a break from the wet palette.)  I just hadn't gotten around to asking about it.  I'll see if I get better results when adding more water.  (I clearly haven't been adding enough!)

 

Running the AC can dry out the air (which in turn will dry out the wet palette faster).  You may not need to add water as often after the weather turns cooler.

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Another thing that I thought of that can dry out wet palette paper and that I don't think has been mentioned here:

 

Make sure you don't have any substantial bubbles between the paper and the sponge or paper towel. Bubbles will keep the paper from contacting the wet substrate and will allow drying, which will cause curling, which can cause more drying.

 

I slide a pencil or chopstick across the surface of the parchment to force out most of the bubbles, which seems to work well.

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I would agree with adding the water every so often. You could also make your sponge or paper towel layer thicker to retain more water so it wouldnt dry as fast 

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