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Beginner paintjob The Others minis

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Hi all, 

 

First time posting and first time painter. Just started painting recently, and while I'm waiting for my Reaper and KD:M minis to get here, I'm practicing on my The Others: 7 Sins ones. I've only painted 5 minis up until now (3 Age of Sigmar starters and 2 The Others), and have noticed the following difficulties:

 

- proper placement of highlights

- proper amount and placement of edge/extreme highlights

- proper way of applying dry brush. 

 

Any tips are welcome. I'm using deerfoot (?) brushes for dry brushing, because regular ones were too flexible, and rhe other cheap ones I have are too rigid. 

 

Link to minis:

https://goo.gl/photos/Arkd9kVm9XYeNrEF9

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Nice first figures! 

 

We highlight and shade figures so that they give the illusion of being illuminated as if they were on a real scale. Take a look at photographs of people wearing say... blue jeans. You know that the material is just that denim (assuming no fancy coloring of jeans). However, the peaks look brighter because they catch the light, and creases are darker because they are shadowed. A miniature doesn't have enough light on it to show the effect without help. 

 

When painting the highlights, try to imagine where the light is coming from, and what part of the figure would be in the path of the light. Then see what would be shadowed or dulled. 

 

The degree of this effect takes practice, and you'll be practicing it as long as you are a painter. In general, I recommend layering for novices before fancier methods (although they have similarities to layering). I also recommend Citadel's Shade type of paint. 

 

Try some colors that are close to the base, like from blue go with a semi light blue for highlights. You can always get brighter after. Likewise for the shadows, go with a semi dark blue in creases. Get darker as needed. Nooks and crannies are done well with washes and the Citadel Shade paint - it falls right in. 

 

For dry brushing, use a nearly dry and crummy quality brush. Frayed is fine. Pick up a minimal amount of paint. Dab some off on a paper. Use the lightest touch across the surface you are drybrushing. It is a hasty and clunky method, but can give good effects. I like it for dirt and stuff like that.

 

Welcome to the forums!

 

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Welcome!

Very nice, a little more highlights and shadows will certainly make them even better.

 

Keep posting your work, browse the forum,you'll find a lot of useful information here.

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Looks like you off to a good start.  Lots of great info here and the people are great to talk to.

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Here are a few tips on how I got a better understanding of:

 

Placement of highlights:

- Hold the mini under a bright lamp, the position of the lamp should be the same as the simulated light source of the mini. Take note of where the bright areas are or better yet take a photo.

- Find photos online of the same mini as painted by different painters to see where they placed the highlights.

 

Amount and placement of edge/extreme highlight:

- With the area of the mini basecoated or even with initial highlight, brush on water on the area while holding it under a bright lamp. Again take note of where the reflection of the lamp is on the surface.

- Find an artist whose style you like and try to emulate how they applied the extreme highlights.

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The quick way to tell whether you have the right amount of paint on your brush for drybrushing is to run it across the back of your non-dominant hand (because the dominant hand is holding the paintbrush ^_^) when you think it's correctly loaded and see whether you're pulling out texture. You should know right away if you have too much paint.

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On 07/08/2017 at 3:13 PM, Doug Sundseth said:

The quick way to tell whether you have the right amount of paint on your brush for drybrushing is to run it across the back of your non-dominant hand (because the dominant hand is holding the paintbrush ^_^) when you think it's correctly loaded and see whether you're pulling out texture. You should know right away if you have too much paint.

Tried this on my Reaper wolf mini. Worked a charm. Very subtle highlights but not so much that it is hidden.

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/IwITyeJ8azWDjD172

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Very well done!

 

The biggest thing is that you painted between the lines!

 

The other techniques like shading and highlighting will just come with time and practice.

 

I can tell by how well you've kept your crisp lines and how you did the eyes that you will have no problem grasping it quickly.

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I really like the blue and gold together on the Age of Sigmar guy.

 

For highlighting and layering I suggest checking out Dr Faust on YouTube.  He has many great videos about how to use base layers and highlight layers.

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