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Against all expectations, I'm getting back into 40K.  This is because, against all expectations, some fine friendly folks are opening a FLGS that's actually local to me.  That is, it's in the small town I live in.

 

Activity is mostly been MTG and other card games along with 40K.  Since they are just starting out they don't really have any terrain to play with.  As it happens, I dont' have lot of stuff for 40K unless the battle is being fought on a planet that just happens to resemble the Ethiopian countryside.  However, I have way too much "possible terrain stuff"/junk laying about so I figure I could knock some things out for people to use at the store.

 

Here are some trees I put together (bases will be done later):

 

Trees2.thumb.jpg.44a5bf5271f2b01ec68ab84afc57e46d.jpg

Trees3.thumb.jpg.efb331910f16d05f3b56b867ab7c20cd.jpg

Trees1.thumb.jpg.2436ac879d774ea6ef15f316a5be6096.jpg

Other plans are

 

  1. To copy Chris Palmer's board game punchout ruins.  So sad about all the punchouts I have thrown away..
  2. Add some Deadzone terrain bits to a styrofoam packing shape to make a bunker.
  3. Build some of the Deadzone terrain as scatter terrain.  Maybe make a tower and some barriers?

 

Any other ideas for quick, cheap, hard wearing 40K terrain are definitely welcome!

 

 

 

 

 

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I've got a box of various plastic household parts I planned on using for 40k. But I haven't played in 10+ years so my terrain making has been doing for fantasy stuff instead. One of my more interesting bits is a toilet float. Instead of being the common ball on a rod it's a vertical setup. Like what you've done.

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Remembered that I have a bunch of unopened ships for Star Wars Armada.  It's like hitting the mother lode in cardboard punch outs.  Also found some interesting flexible foam packing inserts that I think could possibly be integrated with the punch out ruins.

 

Ruins1.thumb.jpg.60a041cbf7959f1898926e18c3b4abb3.jpg

 

Smeared on some caulk to the cut edges to even out the foam's texture and prayed around some silver paint..

 

I'm thinking of going with minimal to no basing on the ruins so they can go on any kind of board or mat and they will pack together nicely.

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Progress on the bunker and on the ruins.  

 

IMG_20170825_171640.thumb.jpg.e93d32c22f53daf2e7b5bb2e58ce49ef.jpg

 

Didn't like how using a wash to weather the ruins looked so I went with some sponge applied chipping. 

 

Originally I used the same paint color on the foam and cardboard bits of the tower but didn't like that so gave each material it's own color.

 

 

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Depending on what you've got to hand...

 

Pringles cans make good towers.

Printer packing material (the inserts) make interesting futuristic buildings.

Could cut up a few egg cartons, make a lower lying pseudo tech thing (if paint will stick to the foamy kind, might check first, else get the recycled paper ones?)

Hills with styrofoam - always find myself needing more hills tbh.

I tend to take plastic bits I find on the street or from the kids' drinks, or other household items and throw them together with some glue and primer, voila, techy something.

 

Anyway just some thoughts off top of my head, good luck it's look like you're on a great start! also grats on the FLGS!

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Any cheap toy or statuette can be a statue.

 

Cheap toy cars from a suitable scale are very useful for scenery.

 

 

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Put together some more of the Deadzone stuff.  Tried to keep it semi modular.

 

Deadzone1.thumb.jpg.15b029642aa6ce3d3713ab17ac9c8c23.jpg

 

Thinking about doing some elevated walkways using the plastic foamboard I base a lot of my terrain with.  A landing pad would also be cool.  Hmmmmm.

 

I guess I should knock out more ruins first and then work on making hills/cliffs/mesas.  

 

 

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Liked for how the tanks turned out not the Parkinsons. A neighbour of mine that has been almost like family all my life has that now too.

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I am sorry to hear about your Mom's condition. My Great Uncle Eddy had Parkinson's.

Your terrain though is WONDERFUL. OUTSTANDING WORK!

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Thanks for the thoughts guys.  She's pretty brave and does OK with the help of a good neurologist.

 

They come in many shapes and sizes and in any color you want as long as that color is dark copper.

 

59b42ccc71ad9_StorageTanks2.thumb.jpg.2f809c179eed85857599bb930e8bcad3.jpg

 

I need to think about how to base these.  If they were going to be used for Necromunda or similar some diamond plasticard with diamond patterns on it would be nice.   

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45 minutes ago, malefactus said:

I think for bases I would go with concrete; broken, cracked, & dirty concrete.

 

Cork carpet is perfect for broken and cracked road bases. You could also use remnants of a cd case.

 

Awesome so far! Your stuff looks really good. Was just watching a let's play of W40K Space Marine and you hit the scenery pretty good.

 

I still have got some remnants of my Imperial Guard somewhere. Hm. Need to have a look. Maybe there is some stuff I could finish, too :-D

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Interesting.  I was just thinking that I should look up a tutorial on how to make broken asphalt (mixing sand/grit into greenstuff) that I'm pretty sure I saw on these forums .  I have some cork sheets so maybe concrete would be easier.

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8 hours ago, lowlylowlycook said:

Interesting.  I was just thinking that I should look up a tutorial on how to make broken asphalt (mixing sand/grit into greenstuff) that I'm pretty sure I saw on these forums .  I have some cork sheets so maybe concrete would be easier.

 

Always good to give it a try ;-D

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