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Goblin Pyro! First attempt at OSL, C&C please?

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gobbo.thumb.jpg.60b01fa433e93273f280ce57707106b2.jpg

 

The moon has blotted out the sun, so my little gobbo pal here needed to light a torch. How does he look? I'm particularly curious about the lighting, since I haven't tried anything like this before. There were three more of him on the sprue, so any advice you can offer will definitely be put to practical use! Thanks, guys!

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He looks fantastic! ::):

 

I'm not great at OSL but how about painting the next goblin in much darker tones as if it's night or he's in a cave? That way, you can achieve a greater contrast with the lighting against his body & how far it raidiates outward.

 

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Looking good. I'm sure the camera is not doing it justice. 

 

Take a look at my first attempt at OSL torch light. What helped me was using a small LED light I had and shining it on the guy from the point of view of the torch. Additionally, as you move away from the source it begins to dim, obviously, and that color is different from the one at the origin. From my studies of what other people far more skilled from me said is that red and orange are your go to for torchlight. Yellow would only really be super close to the source. Unless the source is super close to the object in question then yellow is all over the place. But the same rules apply for a more realistic approach. 

I found that if I didn't have bright enough colors in my collection I would glaze the area with white then reglaze it with the color i had... after it dries of course. If you don't let it dry you get a pink color from the white/red. Dilute the white and build it up. 

 

The farther you get from the source the more the color of the tunic or what have you starts showing up.  

 

Lastly, contrast (as TheOldGuard said) is what sells the illusion. darken the spot around the bright spots and the bright spots stand out more. If you have a fear of messing it up, do it in diluted layers until you get to what looks good to you. 

 

Again, I'm no master but It was far less scary once I started doing it. I now look for ways to add it to miniatures.

 

 

 

 

Here are some links that Ub3r gave me when I started trying to learn it.

You came to the right place... Here you go:

http://massivevoodoo.blogspot.com/2010/01/tutorial-object-source-lightning.html

http://handcannononline.com/blog/2012/08/20/a-beginners-guide-to-heat-and-light-part-2-fire-and-osl/

 

Spoiler

 

 

 

Edited by Arc 724
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OSL is a particular skill to master, but i think for your 1st attempt you got very close!  I love the slight glow on his fingers and head,  the only constructive critism i could offer for the others is think about how the light from the torch would affect his sword metal.  light a candle and grab a butter knife,  doesn't have to be a ton of color, but maybe a dry brush highlight along the facing edges...but honestly i'm just reaching for something to offer as advice.  I'd rate that 9.7/10.

 

great work!!!!

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I'm still trying to 'get OSL myself, so I can't offer much advice.

 

That's very good for a first try! Keep up the good work.

 

 

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