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Some time ago I bought a whole lot of plastic trees from China to make wargaming terrain with. I've finally got around to making a start on basing some of them.

The bases are 3mm MDF, the brown forest floor is real dead leaves munched up in a little ten dollar coffee grinder, and the grass is old-school sawdust flock. Lurking in under the trees behind the Lanchester armoured car is a 15mm British wireless operator, but so good is his camouflage that you can't really see him.

They're not the most realistic terrain pieces ever made, but considering that the trees cost me about fifteen cents each, and everything else was basically free, I'm pretty happy with the results. This is about a fifth of the whole bunch, so I've still got a bit of work ahead of me.

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They do look SPLENDID. While they might not be completely realistic, they give an impression of the way a tree should look that is most pleasing...they look TERRIFIC with the armored car. OUTSTANDING WORK!

Edited by malefactus

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They look very good, and you certainly can't argue with the price!


Also, the radio operator is on the tree stand second from the right, front row, kinda behind the left front fender/wheel well of the armored car.

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@MojoBob, how tough are those trees? I want a bunch more but looking for something tougher than what I have. Mine looked good at first but don't take much handling before getting raggedy. They're white metal or plastic armatures that you need to glue flock and/or cotton batting/webbing on. They take a bit of work to make and can get messed up easily.

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