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Cas

Looking for advice on large, very smooth areas on Bones

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So I'm working on a Kraken, and I'm having some issues with getting nice effects on the large, untextured areas of the flippers and the tentacles. Does anyone have advice on tackling these? Some of my paints go on smoothly and stick well, and some show brush strokes like crazy. 

 

Do I need a heavier sandpaper and just scrub them up before the base layer goes on? The base layer covers well, but after that... ugh. 

 

I just can't get the hang of using shading and washes on this stuff. When I try to do glazing, it ends up looking like water color painting instead of blending. 

 

I apologize for the funny lighting, stupid sun getting into my painting area.

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I would not sand the Bones material. The first layer of paint on Bones needs to be unthinned, as the material is hydrophobic. Reaper paints are a good consistency for this. I've heard that Vallejo is a bit thick to begin with, not sure if it is too thick, and heard that Scale 75 is too thin for first coat. I'm trying my first brown-liner-primed figure darn soon too. As for the layers going poorly... what paints are you using? What brush? This is water color painting in a way, but if that's how you describe it, I'm wondering if you over-thinned your paint. 

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Vallejo, mostly, with the odd Citadel. Some of the Vallejo's game color paints go well, like the bloody red on the tail, and others... don't. I end up having to layer them three or four times to get an even color that doesn't show brush strokes. I do wash the bones first, which seems help with the hydrophobic tendencies, and I don't thin the first coat. 

 

My brushes are a mix of available things. Round brushes ranging from 20/0 to 5 of various brands available at the local hobby shop, and a few flat. I know I need to upgrade brushes, but I am lazy and have not ordered them.

 

I've been watching blending and glazing tutorials online, but the results have been mixed. I'll make another go with less thinning. 

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If you're having problems controlling where the paint is going, you might have too much fluid on your brush. The thing that tends not to get said when people say, "Thinner paint!" is that you need to unload your brush significantly before applying it to the figure.

 

Though if your paint is breaking down, you probably are over thinning. (The answer to that is to add acrylic medium to the mix as well, which will allow you to reduce pigment density without the acrylic layer disintegrating.)

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Eh, no real problems with the paint going where it's supposed to. When I say it ends up looking like water color, it's because the edges of the painted area end up with more color than the rest, which does sound like too much water, now that I'm typing it out. I'll hit up the hobby store today and see if they have any acrylic medium options. 

 

I have a sneaking suspicion that most of my problem will turn out to be needing more patience and more practice. 

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If you put a dot of paint on, it forms a little O of color instead of an actual dot? Yeah, too much fluid on brush and/or too thin of paint. I do that too sometimes and then curse under my breath. It can be a bit of a pain to control. I'm getting better at it, but the struggle is real. May we all practice well. 

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2 hours ago, Cas said:

it's because the edges of the painted area end up with more color than the rest, which does sound like too much water,

 

Might be too much water but it sounds like you need to break the surface tension of the mix with either flow improver/retarder or a bit of dish soap. Personally I use a bit of both but only when I need to make a lot of wash for batch painting. For anything like a single figure I just put a dot of dish soap on my pallet and dip my mixing brush into it to mix into the paint because you only need a little, this is where experience comes in. So cut back the water a bit and add a tiny bit of soap and see if that helps.

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I would suggest the flow improver, not the dish soap. 

Not all soaps are created equal, and some may cause issues with the existing layers, or even on future layers or the varnish. 

If you want to use soap, please experiment on a mini you don't mind stripping of paint again, in case things don't work out. 

 

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The local hobby store appears to be out of acrylic medium, and carries only round brushes in sizes under 2. :P

 

So I started in on that rear flipper, and the paint is beading like I was painting on unwashed bare bones. The paint is an unthinned ink from Vallejo, and the base layer is a regular red color from Vallejo. Testing the others, the heavier paints are going on fine, but many of the colors (not even the inks) are either beading or just showing brush strokes like crazy. 

 

Should I order in a flow improver? Would this help with beading? 

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23 minutes ago, Cas said:

The local hobby store appears to be out of acrylic medium, and carries only round brushes in sizes under 2. :P

 

So I started in on that rear flipper, and the paint is beading like I was painting on unwashed bare bones. The paint is an unthinned ink from Vallejo, and the base layer is a regular red color from Vallejo. Testing the others, the heavier paints are going on fine, but many of the colors (not even the inks) are either beading or just showing brush strokes like crazy. 

 

Should I order in a flow improver? Would this help with beading? 

 

Flow improver is intended to reduce surface tension, so it will likely reduce beading. I don't have much experience with inks, though, so you should probably get some input from somebody who uses them regularly. They don't act precisely like paints.

 

As to acrylic medium, if you have a local art supply store, they should carry it. You don't want anything labeled as "gel" or "heavy"; the regular gloss or matte is what you're looking for. I don't know what part of the world you're in, but in my part of the US, Michaels, Hobby Lobby, or Dick Blick are good choices.

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14 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Flow improver is intended to reduce surface tension, so it will likely reduce beading. I don't have much experience with inks, though, so you should probably get some input from somebody who uses them regularly. They don't act precisely like paints.

 

As to acrylic medium, if you have a local art supply store, they should carry it. You don't want anything labeled as "gel" or "heavy"; the regular gloss or matte is what you're looking for. I don't know what part of the world you're in, but in my part of the US, Michaels, Hobby Lobby, or Dick Blick are good choices.

I'm in the US, but about a two hour drive from any art supply store. The closest we have is a hobby store that's focused on model railroads, RC things, and board games. But that's why we have Amazon! 

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Amazon is a good choice, but I'll also mention Dick Blick, which has a very good online art supply store with good prices and superior service. (It's where I get nearly all my Kolinsky sable brushes.)

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39 minutes ago, Cas said:
56 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

As to acrylic medium, if you have a local art supply store, they should carry it. You don't want anything labeled as "gel" or "heavy"; the regular gloss or matte is what you're looking for. I don't know what part of the world you're in, but in my part of the US, Michaels, Hobby Lobby, or Dick Blick are good choices.

I'm in the US, but about a two hour drive from any art supply store. The closest we have is a hobby store that's focused on model railroads, RC things, and board games. But that's why we have Amazon! 

Reaper's MSP Brush-on sealer is also an acrylic medium, and Vallejo also sells acrylic mediums.  I suspect Citadel paints and other hobby paint producers also have such products, though I haven't looked to be sure.  There are craft paints (like Folk Art) with acrylic mediums in their lines, though I've always used Liquitex primarily.  Liquitex is a fine art brand.

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I've heard that GW does have a medium but I don't remember what the name of it is now. I have quite a few Vallejo paints and I've found they don't work as well with Bones as the Reaper MSP paints. I make out ok if I can get a good coat of MSP, primer or Liquitex medium down first. Even my Vallejo primer refuses to stick well to Bones. Inks don't work for me either unless there's a good coat of something else first. May not be a big help but try figuring out a paint that does stick and cover for you for a first layer.

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