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Weird-O

How do Reaper Inks and Washes work?

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So I recently had to replace my empty bottle of Nuln Oil, but when they charged me eight dollars for a simple thing of paint, I resolved that no means no, and Citadel had just hustled their last dollar out of me.

 

So now I need a new source for inks and washes. Reaper sells them, but they seem to be in the same irritating dropper bottles as all of their other paint. I'm a pot-to-pewter painter, but I guess I can switch if needed as a nuclear last resort. I can understand how droppers work for regular paints, but can anyone explain to me how on/off Earth you do that with washes without ending up with a stained paper plate and nothing on your brush? Better yet, can anyone tell me if there's a section of the store I missed where I can find paint in honest-to-elf pots/jars?

 

Thanks.

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Use a palette or a wet palette. On a wet palette a piece of waxed parchment paper prevents paint from bleeding all over. It just sits there. 

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Save your blister packs and use those when you make a wash.  

 

Paper plates absorb paint. Better to use a cheap plastic one (dollar store) or the lid off a margarine tub. 

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8 minutes ago, Inarah said:

Save your blister packs and use those when you make a wash.  

 

 

Wait, are you talking about making your own washes, or using the pre-made stuff?

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6 minutes ago, Weird-O said:

 

The what the what and the what?

 

 

Palette

71pvPNFeiaL._SY355_.jpg

 

Wet Palette

 

 

painting10-21045700.jpg

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Paint palette well:

21Z94+m1lfL.jpg

Cheap and readily available in any arts/crafts shop.

 

Alternatively, find a ceramic escargot (garlic snail) plate. Easier to clean.

ESCARGOT-plate-ceramic.jpg

 

Wet palette:

STAWET2.jpg

 

EDIT: Ninja'ed! :ph34r:

Edited by Cranky Dog
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54 minutes ago, Weird-O said:

 

Wait, are you talking about making your own washes, or using the pre-made stuff?

 

Yes.  Either way it tends to run more than paint, so I put a few drops in the corner of a blister pack when I need to use it. 

 

You can make a wet palette out of a cheap sandwich container, this blog explains how. http://www.spruegrey.com/diy-wet-pallette/

 

 

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I use these:

 

4982_1.jpg

 

Search for Porcelain Palette with micro wells.

 

I don't ever work from the pot, because the paint is way too thick in the pot for 90% of what I want to do with it.  

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Here's a small porcelain palette in a flower design (Dick Blick photo) I use when I don't want to bother with a wet palette.  Got mine at Hobby Lobby.  They don't scratch like plastic and paint comes off more easily. 

 

03071-1002-2ww-m.jpg

 

A porcelain spot plate (lab equipment) has smaller wells, if you prefer that.

 

Another possibility is getting your own paint pots (or reusing existing ones) and putting the washes or inks in there.  If you like to wash direct from the pot, it saves time.

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1 hour ago, Cyradis said:

Use a palette or a wet palette. On a wet palette a piece of waxed parchment paper prevents paint from bleeding all over. It just sits there. 

 

I use kitchen parchment paper for my home-made wet palette (A plastic sandwich container, with some paper towels folded into it, filled with water, and with a layer of parchment on top.)

 

Note that wax paper is a very different beast, and is completely water-proof. The idea for the wet palette is for the water stored in the palette to slowly diffuse into the paint, through the paper, extending its working life automatically.

 

There is also purpose-made wet palette paper, bit I can't provide much advice on that. (When I tried it, I definitely had the problem of watching my paint bleed all over into a mess.)

Edited by klarg1
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I agree with everyone's recommendation for using a pallet/wet pallet (especially the wet pallet), but if you are a pot-to-pewter painter as you say, it is worth noting that the move to a wet pallet does take some getting used to.  Depending on what you are trying to accomplish with your paint job, it may not be worth the switch.  

 

If you are just looking for a way to use paint from a dropper bottle w/out waste, then the plastic blister or butter lid is path of least resistance.  If you are wanting to work on techniques advocated by those at the top end of the hobby, then go with the wet pallet.

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I've been really happy with a homemade wet pallet. It's just a takeout container lid, some wet paper towels and a piece of parchment paper as mentioned above. 

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Talespinner's Palette looks like the Ceramic Palette from Jacksons Art. 

It's a pretty good AND cheap ceramic. 

I started with plastic pallettes, graduated to this one, then went and made my own micro-well pallette by cutting up and drilling into a plastic chopping board. 

 

Others even use those plastic pill-sheets that many supplements come in when they need a micro-well pallette.

 

Dropper bottles keep the paint good for much longer as less of the paint is exposed to air, and for shorter periods of time.

 

The Nuln Oil is a 24ml pot, right?

Most dropper bottles are 18ml, so there will be a certain price difference. 

But that much?  

That just... doesn't make sense.

 

Another tip for washes is Coat'D Arms washes. They have some sweet colours, and also comes in pots.

 

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1 hour ago, Clearman said:

 

If you are just looking for a way to use paint from a dropper bottle w/out waste, then the plastic blister or butter lid is path of least resistance.

 

It sounds like the plastic blister is probably going to be my choice. I'm still gonna be a pot-painter for the foreseeable future, and it looks like a spare blister will take up a lot less space on my desk than the arcane artifacts everyone else has been showing.

 

Thanks, everyone!

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