NecroMancer

Making a wash

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Hey guys I am thinking about making a wash using craft paints for a project I have going.  I am painting a bunch of rocks and would like to not use one of my Citadel washes as they are pretty expensive.

 

Any ideas for a formula?

 

I am trying to avoid purchasing any matte medium or anything like that.  I have some glaze medium, flow improver, and drying retarder but would like to use these sparingly. 

 

Do think that maybe a combination of water and maybe some dish soap might work?  It does not have to be perfect as this is for rocks and the rocks will also have some snow cover.

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I use water and the Glaze Medium.

Just a drop.

 

 

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Thanks!  Although I am trying to make a larger amount and the cheap craft paints are quite thick.  Think this will work?

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Just water is fine for washes. Craft paint for terrain is a standby, and watering it down should work fine. There are extra fillers in most craft paint, so it won't behave exactly the same, but if you water it down enough you should get a good effect. 

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I would recommend against using standard soaps in a wash.  While they are certainly capable of making the paint flow into cracks, you have the potential for reactivation when the surface gets wet again. 

 

I'm not sure what size bottles you currently have, but you can purchase artist grade mediums, flow improvers and retarders in large quantities at your hobby store of choice (Hobby Lobby/Micheals/Blicks/etc.)

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If you don't wish to buy anything further, plain water plus maybe a drop of glaze medium (depending on what that is) makes a pretty decent wash.

 

Don't use soaps.  As Auberon says, they can cause your paint layer to reactivate when it gets wet.  You don't want your dried paint films to be water-soluble.

 

If you wish to reduce the surface tension of your paint, the tiniest dab of flow improver is preferable to any soap.

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Thanks guys!  I have Reaper flow improver and Vallejo glaze medium so I think I will try those with some water.

 

I have seen people use rinse aid and Pledge floor finish.  Now I imagine the rinse aid may cause the same problem as soap but has anyone tried the floor finish?

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I just use water (from my clean-ish water cup) to make a wash. I'll be experimenting with some flow medium pretty soon in there. I don't tend to have issues, but I do have to be more careful about slopping the wash around than I do with a pre-made. 

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Pledge with Future Shine was used A LOT by scale modelers.  It's been several years since I actively followed Scale Model forums, but I believe it is still in wide use.  It's an acrylic clear with self leveling properties.  Dr. Faust's painting Clinic has a you tube video you might find interesting:

 

https://youtu.be/gR3aIAth5qU

 

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Floor polishes are not intended for use as art materials.

 

I would not recommend them as such.

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For craft paint's, I'd just do water. 

 

You might try adding a drop of glaze medium, but there's so many binders in craft paint that the glaze medium really won't make a difference.

 

I would not use floor polish.  Number one, as Pingo said.  Number 2, you'll get added gloss that you don't want.  Number 3 listen to Pingo. 

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Craft paints tend to break down more rapidly with thinning than higher quality, more expensive paints, so the addition of some sort of medium would probably help. For terrain, if you're OK with the glossy effect, there shouldn't be any problem using Pledge. If you don't want gloss, you would need to use a matte medium or apply a shine killing coat after painting.

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The Pledge as stated, is very glossy.  The gloss I believe, is one of the main features that attracted scale modelers to it.  It provides a nice smooth surface for applying decals,  it also dries fairly hard to provide some modicum of protection to the paint job underneath.  There are several articles in the interwebs  about using it to help repair scratched canopies, for decals, airbrushing etc... I have used it with some Citadel, Reaper and Vallejo paints on tank periscopes, helmet visors, scope lenses, and gems to give them a nice glass like shine without any issues. Most recently, i mixed it with some some Vallejo Model Color and water to shoot through my airbrush to paint a 1/16 Radio Control Tiger 1 tank without issue. 

 

***Disclaimer test it out on old minis or suitable test subjects before using on "good" minis. If anything goes wrong, then do like the rest of us and blame Buglips. ::D:

Edited by Bloodhowl
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16 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

Craft paints tend to break down more rapidly with thinning than higher quality, more expensive paints, so the addition of some sort of medium would probably help. For terrain, if you're OK with the glossy effect, there shouldn't be any problem using Pledge. If you don't want gloss, you would need to use a matte medium or apply a shine killing coat after painting.

 

^What Doug said about the craft paints breaking down. Craft paint uses larger and fewer pigments, it's why it gets gritty or chalky when thinned, and you have to thin it for miniature painting. Even if it's for terrain, I'd go with the recommendation to go to a hobby store like Micheals or Hobby Lobby and get a better quality paint. In the long run, you'll save more money as the better quality paint will require less paint for the desired coverage.

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Rather than detergent, I use glycerine as a surface-tension reducer. It has advantages in that it doesn't react with the paints, and it's less likely to create bubbles as the wash is painted on.

 

Transparent pigment-based inks make a better wash than paint, but if you do use paint, cheap artists' water colours work better than cheap craft paints as the craft paints tend to use a lot of opaque fillers and less, and less finely-ground, pigment.

 

Avoiding matte medium is a false economy. A small pot of Winsor & Newton Galleria Matte Medium will make a lot of wash, and your washes will be better.

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