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    • By Auberon
      for a 5E game.  That's about all I can do for my WIP's theme after only one session.  Mostly it will be monsters.  Maybe I can convince the DM to tell me what's coming so I can paint it.   These are just for tabletop, but my philosophy is you should still try something new on every piece, or at least work on getting better at something you can already do.  Which is why I started a WIP I wasn't even originally going to bother with - for an experiment.
       
      I was looking at the marsh troll and thinking "this would be a good candidate for glaze painting."  Now if you aren't familiar with glaze painting, it is where you prime white and then add washes/glazes of progressively darker colors.  It creates your midtone and shadows, then you go back in and add back the highlights.  You can do it for anything but it is ideal for textures.  Now Bones are white, but you can't just go over them with diluted paints.  Liner works well to prime, but then the mini is no longer white.  But wait, I have a large bottle of white craft paint that I used for some terrain.  What if I prime with liner, give it a heavy drybrush so the highlights are white again, and then glaze paint?
       
      Step 1: Brown liner + a heavy drybrush of white craft paint.
       

       
      Step 2: Green skin starts with yellow paint.  Here is a potential issue - the liner shifts the shadows to green.  As I want green skin this isn't an issue but it would be if I wanted my final color to be yellow.  I am also trying not to be messy as I would need to make any messes white again later.
       

       
      Step 3: Sap green diluted to a wash.  Now the skin is greenish.
       

       
      Step 4: A second wash of sap green in the shadows to add more depth.
       

       
      Step 5: His highlights are still pretty yellow in hand so I made a wash of anthraquinone blue.  It will make the yellow more green and further darken the shadows.
       

       
      Oh, I hit his front too.  It was really blue so I started the color shift with some phthalocyanine green ink.
       

       
      Interlude: Lem.  Needed for a PC.  Must be finished by Friday.  The troll is optional.
       

       
      Step 6:  All leather was hit with a couple of layers of burnt umber ink.
       

       
      Step 7:  The wood was coated with a mix of burnt umber ink and titanium white.  Some of the liner still shows through so the initial color is a little wonky in places.  Maybe it'll add texture to the wood....
       

       
      Step 7: Shade the wood.  Initially I used a burnt umber ink wash, but it wasn't intense enough and would end up  looking like the leather after a few more washes.  So I used the obvious wood shadow color, dioxazine purple ink watered down to a wash.
       

       
      From the front.  His belly got a wash of the burnt umber ink while it was out.  A couple more and it would turn olive, but maybe I'll leave it bluish.  While multiple washes have smoothed it out you can still see texture from the drybrush showing through.  It's an interesting effect here but won't always be desirable.
       

       
      Step 8: Call it a night and go to bed.  I have to work and make money after all.  We can't paint all the time.    Next update - unknown.  I really do need to finish the halfling bard before I play around anymore.
    • By Geoff Davis
      89012: Lem, Iconic Bard sculpted by Derek Schubert.  This guy was supposed to be a speed paint, but I got too interested in putting diamond patterns on his clothes. 
       

       

       

       
       
    • By planetmut
      After painting the Bonesylvanians Lon figure to look like my girlfriend's dog Erebus, I decided my dog Cadbury deserves the same treatment.
       

       
      He's wearing purple trousers because Cadbury chocolate comes in purple wrappers. I don't know why I did the belt in orange though. And please ignore the crappy job on the base.
       

       
      Here he is in real life:
       

    • By Sarducci
      Continuing my paint up of all the bosses in the Forge of Fury, here is Kavorgh, painted up to be the Orc Wight Champion.  My first time playing with a light box to get better pictures too :)

    • By Morihalda
      Whoo! I primed these all last month after ReaperCon. And then they just sat there while I finished other stuff. But now my desk is clear and I'm ready for more art!
       
      I am solidly in the "paint a solid color on the mini with a little shadow and highlight because I wanna play or sculpt" category. I also feel like I could have given my most recent sculpt a lot more love simply by not just painting her all the same shade of brown, haha!
       
      So I've gathered up my paint, a handful of bones minis, my notes from Rhonda, Derek, and Erin, and now it's time to learn how to paint skin! I'm really excited to try out different expressions, skintones, and lighting. I went ahead and primed them so if we need them for any games, they won't have blinding white clothes on. I'm not certain on all the names, but all except maybe 1 or 2 of these were from my Bones III Kickstarter order.
       

       
      I don't want to get pinged for nudity, so I gave this dryad a cute little Space Age dress in case she accidentally gets in the frame while I'm working on other pieces.
       

       
      I'm pretty pleased with it. ;)
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