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peepster1976

NMM first attempt

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First Attempt at NMM.

Watched some videos on Youtube, but i find it difficult where to put the "reflections" on the gold, aka where and how much, do i put the white.

plzz advice.

Colour used

white

middlestone, Vallejo air

Dark earth, vallejo air

burnt umber, vallejo air

carroburg crimson, citadel shade

 

I use vallejo air, because i like the waterys viscosity of the paint. I can wetblend with it on the model.

Just started with Airbrush, so i try to basecolour as much as posible with airbrush

 

2017-10-13 12.15.00.jpg

2017-10-13 12.15.04.jpg

2017-10-13 12.15.15.jpg

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The gauntlet is fine, and I am curious about what was the reference for that axe blade... for me it is very difficult to do NMM at times because you can't really follow nature, and you can't also just highlight normally.

 

My number 1 advice for NMM is keep it dark, and keep transitions small. I see quite a few areas where you pulled it off, and it is mainly a question of contrast. 

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The vambrace works pretty well, but the reflections on the axe are too regular and too much aligned with the head of the axe, I think.

 

First, for future figures, it can be useful to take a photo of the metal figure under relatively small lights to find out where specular reflections might fall. I'll tell you from experience that getting long, stripey specular reflections on flat-ish surfaces is tricky and usually requires long and very narrow lights.

 

If you're more worried about a cool look than absolute fidelity to some notional light's reflections (which is probably where you should be, to be fair), you can choose your highlight positions almost randomly. Marike Reimer, who is a much better painter than I'm ever likely to be, has said pretty much exactly that in classes. But on a given flat surface I'd recommend one or at most two stripes of reflection at an angle to the straight features of the metal.

 

When looking at the axe, the other thing that I'd mention is that you want to bring your shadows down significantly darker, narrow the specular reflection to 1/3 - 1/2 its current width, and work to smooth out your blends. Specular reflections require very high highlights, very deep shadows, and very smooth and rapid transition between them. The vambrace works better, I think, because it looks like you worked the reflection on each bit of the raised details separately, which did all of those things. On the axe, the mass highlighting dominates in a way it doesn't on the vambrace.

 

Hope that helped, and I suspect somebody whose NMM is better than mine will give you more advice.

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19 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

The vambrace works pretty well, but the reflections on the axe are too regular and too much aligned with the head of the axe, I think.

 

First, for future figures, it can be useful to take a photo of the metal figure under relatively small lights to find out where specular reflections might fall. I'll tell you from experience that getting long, stripey specular reflections on flat-ish surfaces is tricky and usually requires long and very narrow lights.

 

If you're more worried about a cool look than absolute fidelity to some notional light's reflections (which is probably where you should be, to be fair), you can choose your highlight positions almost randomly. Marike Reimer, who is a much better painter than I'm ever likely to be, has said pretty much exactly that in classes. But on a given flat surface I'd recommend one or at most two stripes of reflection at an angle to the straight features of the metal.

 

When looking at the axe, the other thing that I'd mention is that you want to bring your shadows down significantly darker, narrow the specular reflection to 1/3 - 1/2 its current width, and work to smooth out your blends. Specular reflections require very high highlights, very deep shadows, and very smooth and rapid transition between them. The vambrace works better, I think, because it looks like you worked the reflection on each bit of the raised details separately, which did all of those things. On the axe, the mass highlighting dominates in a way it doesn't on the vambrace.

 

Hope that helped, and I suspect somebody whose NMM is better than mine will give you more advice.

What would you suggest for trying to figure out where reflections would fall on Bones figures? (I don't believe this giant is available in metal, but I could be wrong) 
I'm about to attempt to do NMM on a Bones mini with lots of armor, but I'm daunted because I'm not sure exactly where the light might reflect.

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17 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

What would you suggest for trying to figure out where reflections would fall on Bones figures? (I don't believe this giant is available in metal, but I could be wrong) 
I'm about to attempt to do NMM on a Bones mini with lots of armor, but I'm daunted because I'm not sure exactly where the light might reflect.

 

Here's a technique that works for me. I hold the figure under a light source and wet the surface with just water. I take note or better yet a photo of the location of the specular highlights are.

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Just now, junex said:

 

Here's a technique that works for me. I hold the figure under a light source and wet the surface with just water. I take note or better yet a photo of the location of the specular highlights are.

Hmm...I might have to try that.

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2 minutes ago, junex said:

 

Here's a technique that works for me. I hold the figure under a light source and wet the surface with just water. I take note or better yet a photo of the location of the specular highlights are.

 

Good idea, and one that I hadn't thought of. You could also use gloss medium to get the same effect, which would last longer but be more work.

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1 hour ago, junex said:

 

Here's a technique that works for me. I hold the figure under a light source and wet the surface with just water. I take note or better yet a photo of the location of the specular highlights are.

 

 I do the exact same thing sometimes. It even works on an already painted surface, of course, to check / get ideas.

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1 hour ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

What would you suggest for trying to figure out where reflections would fall on Bones figures? (I don't believe this giant is available in metal, but I could be wrong) 
I'm about to attempt to do NMM on a Bones mini with lots of armor, but I'm daunted because I'm not sure exactly where the light might reflect.

the gauntlet looks cool for me  ,im not an eminence of nmm but this is what i think: what you could try is to imagine 4 source of ligth and keep the contrast on the nmm, the more contrast you have, more spectacular the metal look, and if you have any problems on belndings you could add some scratches ::P:.  but what you did there is a good start , just need to studie more the material and parctice.:poke: keep the good work::):

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Just now, Kuche said:

the gauntlet looks cool for me  ,im not an eminence of nmm but this is what i think: what you could try is to imagine 4 source of ligth and keep the contrast on the nmm, the more contrast you have, more spectacular the metal look, and if you have any problems on belndings you could add some scratches ::P:.  but what you did there is a good start , just need to studie more the material and parctice.:poke: keep the good work::):

That mini isn't mine. I was just asking a question because I identified that mini as a bones mini. I'm not going to take credit for someone else's work.

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3 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

That mini isn't mine. I was just asking a question because I identified that mini as a bones mini. I'm not going to take credit for someone else's work.

:O sorry my bad :( :mellow:::(::wacko::unsure:

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The old method I learned a long time ago was to take a picture as Doug has said but under a red or blue lightbulb to see where the highlights are.

opps... ps this is done before the mini is primed with just bare metal, because of the reflective nature, but might work but not sure. food for thought.

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