Jump to content
knarthex

What would YOU like to see taught next year

Recommended Posts

On 10/23/2017 at 9:51 AM, Dragoneye said:

Classes specifically for kids. Perhaps only an hour long each. With classes over the course of the con. As well as space reserved for kids when they aren't in class but their parents are. Not a daycare, just a place to land. If this was offered I'd  probably bring my kids.

 

Genghis Con and Tacticon in Denver used to have a place for kids. What made it work was that if you dropped your kids off, you were also committing to volunteering at Con Jr. and signed up for a slot at the same time.

 

26 minutes ago, Bold said:

I've been getting into creating terrain for tabletop wargames, and I think a class on this would be fantastic. Trees, static grass, water effects, etc.

 

There are a few challenges with such a class:

  • TIme. A lot of the techniques require some drying time.
  • Cost. A Reaper Bones mini for each class participant is a negligible expense, but materials for a terrain class may be cost-prohibitive.
  • Mess. Building terrains is messy. Spray adhesives, flock boxes, static grass applicators... I'd hate to be in the classroom for the next slot following the terrain class.

 

You can do quite a bit with cardboard, scrap foam, and sand, which you can get for free if you spend a bit of time gathering up the better sort of trash. (Actual recycling!) You need to buy adhesives and possibly flock, but PVA in quantity is pretty cheap and a big container of flock isn't all that bad. But there is no way that you could do a topic like "terrain" justice in two hours any more than you could do a topic like "miniatures" justice in the same amount of time.

 

The answer to that last problem, of course, is multiple classes. Take smaller bites.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Thes Hunter said:

A class on various types of clear paints, and their uses on different methods and materials would be neat. 

In Jessica Rich's class on glazing, that was all we used....

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GHarris said:

Huh. Ergonomics. I would actually be qualified to teach that! I had the "seriously, we need to go to Reapercon next year!" discussion with the wife and I think we are going to make it happen. You may need to remind me as the date comes closer, if there is still interest who knows?

 

As Mnemonic pointed out ergonomics would be hard to stretch out over 2 hours. Basically by the nature of what we are doing we are doing bad ergonomics, especially when painting. Look at pictures of people painting- basically don't do that! Problem is people steady themselves with their arms on the table, and lean in so they can see what they are doing, that is pretty hard to avoid. You can raise the table to a correct height, get good lighting and get corrective eyewear but people are still going to hunch over. 

 

I think I would talk more about reversing that bad posture, relieving pain and preventing nerve impingement. Taking breaks, doing scapular/shoulder/neck/chest exercises and stretches, being aware of posture in general. I would probably also touch on hand care, and preventing/treating carpal tunnel syndrome from the neck down to the hands. Maybe even throw in some medial or ulnar nerve glides? Maybe talk about text neck, which overlaps a lot with neck pain in what we do? 

 

 

good ideas!  but really... you can fill the remaining time with a drill sargent-like hands-on time. Have the students paint and walk around yelling at them. ;) I think that's what I need.

1 hour ago, knarthex said:

In Jessica Rich's class on glazing, that was all we used....

I then got to apply all that in Portaiture... it was illuminating. I highly recommend taking those two classes in that order. um, yeah, and I didn't use yellow again. :p

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is helpful, guys!!!

I'm trying to decide for next year what to do.  I'm wondering if I could combine a paint consistency, brustrokes and ergonomics and fill up the time- something like a "how to get started painting" type of class. Except in all my classes I try to demo the paint consistency bit because it seems more important than anything else. 

 

I may drop the color theory class next year just because teaching 5 is a lot.

 

I know if you're looking for a how to paint for competition type lecture, then Rhonda's level up is a great class.

 

Please everyone- if you have feedback on classes, send it to reaper- they want to know and we want to know what we can do better and this also helps us plan what you guys need in the future!! yay!!

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also am happy to see this thread, and I wanted your opinions on which classes I should teach next year as well!

 

My blending class seems to always sell out (or even oversell!), so I'm willing to teach two slots next year if that would be helpful to everyone.  It is also a very fun class for me to teach, so I'm hoping that that will be a win-win.

 

My exotic NMM class also always does well, but, for next year, I was contemplating simply doing a basic NMM class.  However, NMM takes a while to teach, and so I wondered if a 4-hour "Everything You Need to Know About NMM" class would be more welcome.  My idea for that class would be to cover steel/silver and gold NMM over flat and rounded surfaces before diving into more advanced techniques like sky-earth NMM (chrome) and alternate highlighting methods.  Along the way, we would hopefully have some time to add some scratches and blood and practice each NMM color family hands-on.  Is that too much, or would anyone be interested?

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Mnemonic said:

I like the ergonomics suggestion, but think it may be tough to fill 2 hours. Maybe such a class can also cover ideas on how to organize a paint station, suggestions on what kit you need (segmented by general skill level), and other handy tools of the trade (covering various products, web tools/resources).

 

I also like the idea of a class devoted to special effects. Aryanun said it best:  simulated rain, drool, water puddles, Spanish Moss hanging from branches, rusted/corroded metal, acid puddles, blood spatter, using LEDs, fire/lava effects...  I do know that Michelle has a blood and gore class, so I'd eliminate that overlap.

 

Another idea is to offer a few more instances of the most popular classes if possible. Hopefully the data is available someplace, but if a class sold out 20 minutes after registration opened then that is what I'm targeting. I'm sure there are many that would appreciate the added flexibility of taking a highly desired class in 2 or 3 possible timeslots.

 

I especially like, and agree with,  that bolded part (emphasis mine).

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Kuro Cleanbrush said:

I also am happy to see this thread, and I wanted your opinions on which classes I should teach next year as well!

 

My blending class seems to always sell out (or even oversell!), so I'm willing to teach two slots next year if that would be helpful to everyone.  It is also a very fun class for me to teach, so I'm hoping that that will be a win-win.

 

My exotic NMM class also always does well, but, for next year, I was contemplating simply doing a basic NMM class.  However, NMM takes a while to teach, and so I wondered if a 4-hour "Everything You Need to Know About NMM" class would be more welcome.  My idea for that class would be to cover steel/silver and gold NMM over flat and rounded surfaces before diving into more advanced techniques like sky-earth NMM (chrome) and alternate highlighting methods.  Along the way, we would hopefully have some time to add some scratches and blood and practice each NMM color family hands-on.  Is that too much, or would anyone be interested?

Interested!!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been thinking about a terrain class, and what might be fun to see. And while flocked hills are insanely easy (and messy), I think that something more like a Generic Ruined Stone Structure might be the best option. 
 
Doesn't have to be big, maybe something 3" wide, 5" long, and 2-3" tall. Foam core walls, MDF base, and coffee stirrer floor. Sand/Flock/Snow could be discussed, but not done in class. 
 
Class would include 2 main parts: building the structure, and discussing terrain projects more generally.
 
Corner Ruin of a stone building, with a shattered upper floor just big enough for 1 or 2 minis to stand on. 
scribing the stonework or bricks onto the outside of the building, 
Building the basic structure:
carving chunks out to make doors, windows, and other holes in wall. 
Making the upper floor, and maybe a ladder. 
Bit of detail work like adding a broken door, or piles of rubble in the corner.
 
Topics to be covered beyond simply building the structure:
Scaling things correctly.
Measure twice, cut once!!! 
A focus on playability of the piece. 
Different glues and their uses and issues (hot, super, white/craft), 
paints (use the cheap stuff!!)
Other materials and their pros and cons - insulation (pink/blue) foam, cardboard, paper, etc. 
Edited by Crowley
Spelling
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were somehow able to make it to ReaperCon, my top class picks, in order, would be:

 

1) Painting with Oils/Tube Acrylics

2) Painting with Pastels/Dry Pigments

3) Shaded Metallics

4) Special Effects in Basing

5) Hands-On Sculpting Basics for Beginners

6) Monochrome Painting

7) Painting Freehand

8) Painting Bright Colors - using those really bright colors like magenta and bright yellow and neon green to achieve really awesome color combos like:

mantis_shrimp.jpg.6cf4259fa792233f6ccc720af238b8f4.jpg

59f0be3f9d4aa_Lilac-breastedRoller11-26-2013-9706.thumb.jpg.f9d2098abaee297f279a4e41cce042f6.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Kuro Cleanbrush said:

I also am happy to see this thread, and I wanted your opinions on which classes I should teach next year as well!

 

My blending class seems to always sell out (or even oversell!), so I'm willing to teach two slots next year if that would be helpful to everyone.  It is also a very fun class for me to teach, so I'm hoping that that will be a win-win.

 

My exotic NMM class also always does well, but, for next year, I was contemplating simply doing a basic NMM class.  However, NMM takes a while to teach, and so I wondered if a 4-hour "Everything You Need to Know About NMM" class would be more welcome.  My idea for that class would be to cover steel/silver and gold NMM over flat and rounded surfaces before diving into more advanced techniques like sky-earth NMM (chrome) and alternate highlighting methods.  Along the way, we would hopefully have some time to add some scratches and blood and practice each NMM color family hands-on.  Is that too much, or would anyone be interested?

Yeah, I like the idea of 4 hours on NMM. Some ideas just take way longer to teach/learn.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciated the 'paint and take' and the 'speed painting' areas as a gateway for people like me who had no intentions of taking a class. I came for the RPG gaming with my friends who were interested in painting, but by the end of the con, the guys who just came to game were wishing they'd have taken classes, me included! Can't wait to take classes next time and hear from all the experienced teachers.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Corporea said:

I may drop the color theory class next year just because teaching 5 is a lot.

As a beginner, I wish I had taken this class. I understand that 5 would be a lot to teach, so if you do drop it, I hope someone else picks it up. Btw, I really enjoyed & got a lot out of your layering class.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Kuro Cleanbrush said:

My blending class seems to always sell out (or even oversell!), so I'm willing to teach two slots next year if that would be helpful to everyone.  It is also a very fun class for me to teach, so I'm hoping that that will be a win-win.

 

It was extremely useful and very well taught. Highly recommended, along with Rhonda's blending with textures class for leveling up your blending.

 

6 hours ago, Kuro Cleanbrush said:

My exotic NMM class also always does well, but, for next year, I was contemplating simply doing a basic NMM class.  However, NMM takes a while to teach, and so I wondered if a 4-hour "Everything You Need to Know About NMM" class would be more welcome.  My idea for that class would be to cover steel/silver and gold NMM over flat and rounded surfaces before diving into more advanced techniques like sky-earth NMM (chrome) and alternate highlighting methods.  Along the way, we would hopefully have some time to add some scratches and blood and practice each NMM color family hands-on.  Is that too much, or would anyone be interested?

 

I'm interested in most 4-hour classes. I find that many subjects are better taught and practiced in that kind of time frame. It also has the advantage that you know that the students took the first two hours worth of NMM before trying out Sky-Earth. ::P:

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Corporea said:

I may drop the color theory class next year just because teaching 5 is a lot.

 

You are making me wish I took that class this year.  I did enjoy the Difficult Colors class and need to practice what I learned since I did not get a chance to finish the yellows before time was up.

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Kev!
      Howdy,
       
      Finally got around to her...
       

       
      Thank you,
      Kev!
    • By JackMann
      I recently got my ReaperCon goodies from my convention buddy. Since I caught a cold right before coming home from Kuwait, this mini felt especially relatable to me.
       

       
      I looked over Buglips' and Guindyloo's versions of the mini, and they informed how I went a bit. Guindyloo's eye in particular was something I wanted to try replicating. I think I did an okay job. I should have picked a lighter color of blue, though. The pupil doesn't really stand out from the iris. 
       

       
      My tissue box's lines ended up not being quite as clean as I would've liked. I need to practice my freehand more.
    • By knarthex
      My daughter sent me this from a blog she showed me....
       
       
      Valhalla does not discriminate against the kind of fight you lost. Did you lose the battle with cancer? Maybe you died in a fist fight. Even facing addiction. After taking a deep drink from his flagon, Odin slams his cup down and asks for the glorious tale of your demise!
      Oh my god, this is beautiful. 
       
      A small child enters Valhalla. The battle they lost was “hiding from an alcoholic father.” Odin sees the flinch when he slams the cup and refrains from doing it again. He hears the child’s pain; no glorious battle this, but one of fear and wretched survival.
       
      He invites the child to sit with him, offers the choicest mead and instructs his men to bring a sword and shield, a bow and arrow, of the very best materials and appropriate size. “Here,” he says, “you will find no man who dares to harm you. But so you will know your own strength, and be happy all your days in Valhalla, I will teach you to use these weapons.”
       
      The sad day comes when another child enters the hall. Odin does not slam his cup; he simply beams with pride as the first child approaches the newcomer, and holds out her bow and quiver, and says “nobody here will hurt you. Everyone will be so proud you did your best, and I’ll teach you to use these, so you always know how strong you are.”
       
      ————
       
      A young man enters the hall. He hesitates when Odin asks his story, but at long last, it ekes out: skinheads after the Pride parade. His partner got into a building and called for help. The police took a little longer than perhaps they really needed to, and two of those selfsame skinheads are in the hospital now with broken bones that need setting, but six against one is no fair match. The fear in his face is obvious: here, among men large enough to break him in two, will he face an eternity of torment for the man he left behind?
       
      Odin rumbles with anger. Curses the low worms who brought this man to his table, and regales him with tales of Loki so to show him his own welcome. “A day will come, my friend, when you seek to be reunited, and so you shall,” Odin tells him. “To request the aid of your comrades in battle is no shameful thing.”
       
      ———-
       
      A woman in pink sits near the head of the table. She’s very nearly skin and bones, and has no hair. This will not last; health returns in Valhalla, and joy, and light, and merrymaking. But now her soul remembers the battle of her life, and it must heal.
       
      Odin asks.
      And asks again.
      And the words pour out like poisoned water, things she couldn’t tell her husband or children. The pain of chemotherapy. The agony of a mastectomy, the pain still deeper of “we found a tumor in your lymph nodes. I’m so sorry.” And at last, the tortured question: what is left of her? 
       
      Odin raises his flagon high. “What is left of you, fair warrior queen, is a spirit bright as fire; a will as strong as any forged iron; a life as great as any sea. Your battle was hard-fought, and lost in the glory only such furor can bring, and now the pain and fight are behind you.“
       
      In the months to come, she becomes a scop of the hall–no demotion, but simple choice. She tells the stories of the great healers, Agnes and Tanya, who fought alongside her and thousands of others, who turn from no battle in the belief that one day, one day, the war may be won; the warriors Jessie and Mabel and Jeri and Monique, still battling on; the queens and soldiers and great women of yore.
       
      The day comes when she calls a familiar name, and another small, scarred woman, eyes sunken and dark, limbs frail, curly black hair shaved close to her head, looks up and sees her across the hall. Odin descends from his throne, a tall and foaming goblet in his hands, and stuns the hall entire into silence as he kneels before the newcomer and holds up the goblet between her small dark hands and bids her to drink.
       
      “All-Father!” the feasting multitudes cry. “What brings great Odin, Spear-Shaker, Ancient One, Wand-Bearer, Teacher of Gods, to his knees for this lone waif?”
       
      He waves them off with a hand.
       
      “This woman, LaTeesha, Destroyer of Cancer, from whom the great tumors fly in fear, has fought that greatest battle,” he says, his voice rolling across the hall. “She has fought not another body, but her own; traded blows not with other limbs but with her own flesh; has allowed herself to be pierced with needles and scored with knives, taken poison into her very veins to defeat this enemy, and at long last it is time for her to put her weapons down. Do you think for a moment this fight is less glorious for being in silence, her deeds the less for having been aided by others who provided her weapons? She has a place in this great hall; indeed, the highest place.”
       
      And the children perform feats of archery for the entertainment of all, and the women sing as the young man who still awaits his beloved plays a lute–which, after all, is not so different from the guitar he once used to break a man’s face in that great final fight.
       
      Valhalla is a place of joy, of glory, of great feasting and merrymaking.
       
      And it is a place for the soul and mind to heal.
      literal tears in my eyes omg
      This is a very beautiful thought, but Valhalla isn’t the only grand hall one can go to for their afterlife; I’d love to hear stories as beautiful as this for other halls.
       
      There is a young girl, her body frail and small. The girl bares the marks of so many scars, so many beatings from her broken home. Every night was a constant fight to stay safe, every day at school, she had to say her bruises were from playing too hard. Her teachers would look at her, but not see what was happening, and the girl kept suffering. She hardly had a childhood before her mother took it from her one night, a drug induced rage that ended her life far too soon. 
       
      The girl enters the hall of Folkvangr, sobbing at every step. The goddess Freya, ethereal and lovely, sits upon a golden throne at the highest point of the hall. Freya is concerned, her brows furrowed. 
      “Why do you cry, child?” she asks, her voice rings like a thousand bells, echoing through the mighty hall. 
      The little girl hiccups, she fidgets and hides her scars, “you are so beautiful, and I’m afraid I’m too ugly to be here.” 
      Freya descends from her throne, gliding and golden like the passing of sunlight through trees. She kneels in front of the girl and embraces her.
      “Dear child, I am the Vanadis Freya, goddess of beauty and battle. I have the first choice of the slain, and I chose you. You are beautiful and your fight is over. You have a home with me now. I will teach you to fight so that you never need to be afraid again, and I will love you no matter what.” 
      The girl looks up and sees the faces of gently smiling women and girls of all ages and colors behind the goddess. She knows that she has gained many mothers and grandmothers and sisters. The girl knows that for the first time since she can remember, she will finally be loved.
       
      There is an old man with old wounds. He fought in war to protect everyone, only to come home to poverty and sadness. The old man lived the final days of his life on a bench in the park, and no one mourned him. 
      When he wakes up, he is in a dark house, made of stone. Snow falls sleepily outside. There are cheery little candles on top of many stout wooden tables in the great room. A tall pale woman sits with a black dog at one of these tables. There are people all around; eating, laughing, playing games like old friends. The house is loud and merry with fellowship.
      A call rings out over all the noise. 
      “Good to see ya pal! Come sit with us!” 
      A younger man beckons towards the old man, and he reluctantly joins the youngster and his companions at the table. 
       Many of the men and women at the table pat him on the back. The lady’s dog curls up at his feet. One of them even pushes their bowl of hot stew to the old man. The old timer enjoys the warmth in his bones, the thought of not going to sleep hungry fills him up with happiness that makes his eyes sting with the icy bite of tears.
      “I appreciate it all, but surely this is a mistake. I don’t know you all” the old man is afraid that now they will shoo him away, like so many others. Instead, the lady with the dog kindly grasps his hand, her face melts in understanding. 
      “This is Helheim, and in Helheim, we are all remembered. I am Hel. You are among friends now. You will never go hungry, you will never be alone again.” 
      Time passes, and the old man has made many friends in Helheim. Some nights, when the snow falls hardest, a new person will appear, shy and uncertain. The old man always rises from his seat, always certain to have a warm drink in both hands. The old man gives the newcomer his friendliest smile and says,
      “Good to see ya pal, come sit with us.” 
       
      Two young men, both in love. They hoped to get married, but then the doctors said the two worst words you could ever hear. The sickness ravaged one of them, and broke the heart of the other. The sick man barely recognized himself in the mirror anymore, and the other felt like he was drowning in helplessness. 
      Months later, it’s the night of the funeral for the sick man. His lover clings to photos of them together.  He can’t see through the hurt, he can’t find it in himself to do anything but cry. His entire body aches with how much he misses his lover. The young man turns to cheap gas station beers to drown out the pain. Driving home with too many open cans on the floor, he hits a deer and tumbles into a ditch. 
       
      He finds himself on the ground in a golden forest, with trees arching so high into the sky, he can barely see the tops. The falling leaves dance to the song of the gentle winds, and the sunlight plays over everything in sight. He realises its not the wind singing; there’s the melody of many singing voices carried on the breeze. The young man follows it to a bright clearing in the woods. Many people are there, making flower crowns and laughing. The heady smells of wine and cooking meat wafts around him. At the front of the crowd is a man in rich finery, laughing with all the rest. The air is alight with joy and the sounds of bells. 
      But most importantly of all is his boyfriend, glowing with health, covered in flowers and smiling. 
       
      Hope this touches you all as much as it did me...
       
      George
    • By Kev!
      Howdy,
       
           For my twelfth day of International Mini Painting Month I present Ungorth, Cthon Summoner - Reaper Con 2016 exclusive...
       


       
      Kev!
    • By Kev!
      Howdy,
       
           Here is a model I painted at ReaperCon 2017...
       


       
       
      Also the Overlords Casualty Marker,
      Kev!
  • Who's Online   45 Members, 6 Anonymous, 0 Guests (See full list)

×