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    • By Crowley
      As I said on my Saproling's topic, I had today off, so...  I decided that in addition to the saprolings, I'd knock out some tabletop quality ghouls. They were already assembled and primed, so the first thing was to paint the undead flesh. I used Vampire Shadow for their sickly skin. It didn't quite match the ghoul I'd painted before, but it was close enough. I sadly didn't always take good notes...

      After that I decided that as these were primarily going to be gaming ghouls, and not for a unified force for Kings of War, they'd each get their own clothing color: Red, Green, Blue, Tan, and Dark Brown. I used Rusty Red, Muddy Olive, Rich Indigo, Desert Stone, and Ruddy Flesh. The eyes were all painted with Walnut Brown, as were the spikes sticking out of them. 


      Then I washed them all with a mix of 4 parts sepia wash and 1 part black wash. 

      A little bit of highlighting with the base clothing color, then it was time to paint the bases black, and then flock them! Oh, and a bit of watered down rusty red around the mouth.

       
      Oh, and aged pewter on the spikes and the cleaver. 
       

      Looking good for such quick work.  
    • By lazarp
      This one was super fun to paint 
      This is the first time I tried to do glowing effect on a mini, I think it could have been better but I like how it turned out!
      Comments and criticism are welcome 
       

    • By Painting Miniatures
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzWwEryYc3Q
       
      So one of my campaign encounters calls for a skeleton playing a violin. I had a few ideas on how I could go about accomplishing this. Modifying a skeleton miniature to hold a violin. Then I found this mini. I really wish they had a version that wasn't metal for this miniature though.
       
      The mini in question is supposed to be the boss of an encounter the players run into which leads into bigger plots later. In short though its supposed to be dripping a black ichor from the eyes to make it scarier and to emphasis the point "this is a powerful enemy" and not just some random skeleton bard.
       
      The actual painting went along the lines of
       
      White base coat, followed by coloring the violin and leather straps brown, the metal armor black, i did a wash of brown followed by a black to give contrasting colors of dirt and mold. I also added a small amount of a lighter blue as a wash to the violin and bow to make it contrast ever so slightly from the rest of the mini and to hopefully give it a sort of magical look. That last part didn't succeed like I had hoped but it was a good lesson in what does and what does not work.
       
      I know the base needs something else to make it pop. This mini isn't "finished" yet for that very reason but im not sure how i want to finish the base of the mini. Probably some dirt. because dirt is always a good choice for a graveyard. I really should change my name to the "painting horror minis channel" because its an unintentional theme.









    • By Painting Miniatures
      I plan on posting something a little more friendly looking very shortly. coughwyrmgeardragoncough but in the mean time I painted this for fun and practice!
       
      Also would take some advice on dealing with small details like a face. On this miniature it was nearly impossible to just paint specific details of the face without smooshing the entire face with paint. I'd wanted to give the figure blood red eyes. That didn't work out and I ended up painting over the face in white to start over again.
       
      I do overall like how this miniature turned out. The bones aren't crispy perfect white, the clothes look like a creature that's been walking through mud and dirt for a long time. Didn't know how to paint the base so I went with some of my extra black wash which worked out as it sort of made it look like it was standing on bone.
       
      Tried a new technique on the scythe. I did the base coat as filigree silver, then I did a paint of dragons blood red, then when that dried i went over it again with the black wash to give it this dried blood effect. A technique that is probably standard but one I personally just learned by experimenting!


    • By Sanael
      Six skellies, painted quickly during several lunch breaks, with little intent other than to be available for the table.
       
      Given the state of their weapons, it is ironic that I used them to "knock the rust off" a few of my skills.

      Color coded for ease of D&D mook-murder. I had a little fun with some traditional heraldic divisions on the shields.

      Paints are all Reaper MSP. Blackened Brown played a large role, as did a lovely fleshy-toned sample paint.
       
      ... Pictures are quite bad, actually. I may reshoot at home.
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