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Reaperbryan

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Petter Northug, also known as 'the Mosvik Express', a Norwegian Cross-country skier who just retired, was once named 'Athlete of the year'... in Sweden...

 

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You know the shuttles?

The reusable spacecraft with those incredibly high-tech and expensive tiles... 

That were held on with common bathroom sealer...  

 

 

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On the Lewis & Clark trans-America expedition they used two French made air rifles, powerful enough to kill deer with virtually no noise. This was incredibly impressive to the natives they would meet. Also, the containers for the gun powder of their other rifles was made from lead, just the right amount in each container to melt down and make the appropriate number of balls for their guns.

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Sulzer Engineering and Manufacturing Co have been making Marine Engines since 1834. They are the worlds largest Marine diesel engine manufacturer and their engines are the main propulsion units in most of the ships I have sailed in during my time at sea.

... And they are Swiss...:upside:

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On 12/12/2018 at 3:32 PM, Gadgetman! said:

You know the shuttles?

The reusable spacecraft with those incredibly high-tech and expensive tiles... 

That were held on with common bathroom sealer...  

 

 

And this wasn't a good thing - part of the reason why we lost a shuttle. ::(:

 

The Auld Grump - it was supposed to be less expensive per launch than the old Atlas and Mercury vehicles, but ended up costing more. Go SpaceX! (Not sarcasm, at all, at all. SpaceX makes me very happy.)

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The SpaceX BFS, now called 'Starship', is being constructed with a stainless steel skin.

 

This is not unusual. People mock it for its 1950s look but they don't realize or remember the Atlas line of rockets use a stainless steel skin as well. They still use it today. The Atlas III used it until 2005, the Centaur upper stage still uses it today. WD-40 was invented to keep the unpainted steel rockets from rusting until the use of titanium dioxide paint allowed for the bright white rockets we all remember fondly.

 

The difference between then and now is a cryogenic cold-forming process. Big plates of steel can now be cold-formed under cryogenic temps to give it better rigidity. The old Atlas boosters used to be called 'balloon rockets' because they collapsed like deflated balloons if they weren't kept pressurized with something (fuel, nitrogen, etc). The Starship doesn't require such pressurization because of the cold-forming process. The stainless steel rocket needs less heat shielding simply because steel handles more heat than carbon composites or aluminum because, duh, it's steel. Which keeps it lighter. Light enough to be tossed around in a wind storm ::P:

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52 minutes ago, TheAuldGrump said:

And this wasn't a good thing - part of the reason why we lost a shuttle. ::(:

 

The Auld Grump - it was supposed to be less expensive per launch than the old Atlas and Mercury vehicles, but ended up costing more. Go SpaceX! (Not sarcasm, at all, at all. SpaceX makes me very happy.)

 

Bathroom sealer was actually the best they found to fasten the tiles with.   

 

The reason why the shuttles was so expensive and cumbersome was because certain agencies required it to be able to reach a very high orbit which if I remember correctly they only did on one mission...   

They even required it to be capable of launching up to a POLAR orbit...     

(And the cargo bay was designed to be able to fit the largest size military spy sattelites in use or being designed at the time)

 

No wonder they ended up with such a mess of a ship that had to use SRBs. 

 

SpaceX is a company and assorted organisations with 'special interests' have no say over their designs, so they can build the ship to be much more effective. 

Maybe they will get it right. 

 

 

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48 minutes ago, paintybeard said:

Genuinely surprised by this. I'd want to see the statistics.

I'm guessing most of the deaths are the result of traffic accidents with said deer.  I'm curious what the actual numbers are.

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2 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

Oh Deer!

CHAOSTROPHIC-SCAREY-FACTS-8-600x456.jpg

 

 

1 hour ago, paintybeard said:

Genuinely surprised by this. I'd want to see the statistics.

 

https://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

Fatality Numbers for vehicle crashes, all causes, United States.

 

TLDR: 32K—42K per year. 

 

21 minutes ago, Xiwo Xerase said:

I'm guessing most of the deaths are the result of traffic accidents with said deer.  I'm curious what the actual numbers are.

 

Link establishes an upper limit for all fatalities, all crash causes. 

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39 minutes ago, TGP said:

 

https://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

Fatality Numbers for vehicle crashes, all causes, United States.

 

TLDR: 32K—42K per year. 

 

 

Link establishes an upper limit for all fatalities, all crash causes. 

 

Ah, I could believe this is true for USA, but when you include what spiders, snakes and other scary beasties get up to in Australia I should think deer are a long way down the world lethality list. 

Edited by paintybeard
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