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Reaperbryan

Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

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Well I gotta tell you something! @Reaperbryan!

 

I just read your goodbye thread.

 

First of all, Thank you for all you have done for us!

Second, I hope you will still visit here.

Third,  Thanks, thanks and thanks.

 

And I want to wish you the best.

Hope you will be happy and succesful in your new position.

 

A big AAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRROOOOOOOOOOOOO for you!

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1 minute ago, ttuckerman said:

I wish to second that you will be missed.  You can stay as NonReaperBryan.

I like that. :lol:

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Bryan, you've made me sad.

 

Thank you for making all of us welcome and feel that we finally had the freedom to be ourselves here. You've been such a great man that it's no wonder that so many of us are rabidly fanatical to the Space Papacy and Bryanzilla in general. we've all been able to just be goofy and you've not only allowed it, you've encouraged it. I've barely known you for more than 2 years and yet I count you as one of my dearest friends and I want to thank you for all that you've done for us.

 

Also, I'm saying it first: dibs on your lands and title.:lol:

 

.....:down:

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Well... that is something I was not expecting to happen today.  I admit, I'm a little saddened because you have been a strong presence and influence here on the boards.  I am also glad that you have an opportunity that has you excited, even if there are butterflies at the prospect.  Good luck out there!  Thank you for everything you have done for us.  And if you have trouble fitting everything in your office into your cardboard boxes, I'm sure we can do some random draws and find good homes for them all.

Best of luck and I'm glad I got the opportunity to stand beside you at the gates of (ReaperCon) Chaos and help stem the tide.

In the words of a friend from another genre, "Live long and prosper!"

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Bryan, you have made me rethink my career goals and staying where I am at.  If you can move on...I can too!

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You can do a simple diffraction physics experiment with a strand of hair and a laser pointer of known wavelength (even the weak ones that are used as cat toys). Also need a length measuring tool. 

 

Shine the laser pointer at the hair (can hold hair up to the pointer in one hand). Shine pointer on wall in a dark room. Instead of a point, you'll see a set of elongated dots on the wall. 

 

By measuring the distance from the hair to the wall, and the spacing of the dots (roughly), you can get an approximate diameter of the hair. 

 

A physics professor started asking students for hair - then showed us this experiment. We had very different hair thinknesses. 

 

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As much as I love Marvel's Thor comics/movies and Tom Hiddleston's Loki, in the original Norse tales Loki is much more interesting.  And weird.  Or maybe I mean kinky. 

 

Basically most of the weirder creatures and monsters are his kids.  Sleipner, his (he was the mother btw so I guess technically hers would be more accurate here).  Fenrir, his.  Jörmungandr, his.  Hel, his.  He also had some normal kids.  Basically shapeshifter family trees get a bit odd.

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Pop culture depicts ancient gold coins as as thick as modern coins or even thicker, great slabs of metal.

But real gold (and silver) ancient coins were hammered as thin as possible, almost like foil, because metal was precious and rare.

 

These coins, originally from the Fatimid Caliphate about a thousand years ago, are typical.

274387

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The Romans taxed their coinage directly. Every few years older coins became unusable as payment, and the only way to get new was to exchange them, for a rate.

This is why archeologists REALLY like finding roman coins; they're really accurate timestamps.

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