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Reaperbryan

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Makes sense; I sometimes dream about my dog.

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SPOILERS FOR A FIFTY YEAR OLD MOVIE! You were warned.

Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho is justly famous for a number of reasons. I will dwell on two:

1. During the infamous shower scene, only ONCE do we ever see the knife actually touch Janet Leigh's stunt double. The fast cuts provide the ILLUSION that the killer is slashing her into wet confetti, but at ONE point and ONE point only, the knife is seen to touch and slightly dimple her skin near her navel. The blood swirling down the drain was in fact Bosco chocolate syrup, since the movie was in black and white, who's gonna know the difference? And while Ms. Leigh was obviously there for the closeups, yes, a stunt double was the one actually in the shower for most of the stabby stabby.

2. At the very end of the film, Norman is seen handcuffed in the police station, right before we cut to Janet Leigh's car getting pulled out of the swamp. He has a short monologue (mental; we hear what he's thinking, but his lips don't move) in his mother's voice.

The FIRST time I saw the movie, when he stops talking, I thought he grinned.
The SECOND time I saw the movie, when he stops talking, he DOES grin... but I noted that his lips are closed, throughout the entire scene... but we can see his teeth. Urr?
I got a VHS copy, and watched the film a THIRD time, and inched through the end of his monologue, frame by frame. I was right. Norman never opens his mouth or shows his teeth. What I was seeing was a genuine subliminal shot: for a few frames of film, the mummified face of Norman's mother is superimposed over Norman's face... nailing down the idea that Norman's mother-personality has completely overridden his Norman-personality... perhaps forever.

Chilling. And cleverly done. psycho-optimized_5788ceb20c0f4.jpg.08505a78ffb3e2dae449c44ab7b3e6fa.jpg5a56c295eef9e_download(1).jpg.c63de338b4a59a3db33a68f0c3edb5e7.jpg (The picture of Norman is, I believe, the FIRST pic in which Mom's teeth are visible; actually watching the scene, the skullface grows more pronounced, on lip, nose, and particularly his forehead, and then is obscured as we fade to the car being dragged out of the swamp. The cut only lasts a couple of seconds, or about 50 frames of film; it's literally blink and you miss it).

Oddly, this was shortly after there was a big noise in Hollywood about the possible use of subliminal messages in movies to sell refreshments...

subliminal-messages.jpg.a4ce34df98a6146f797cd9128dfe62ed.jpg

 

The movie was based on Robert Bloch's novel Psycho, which was VERY loosely based on the true crime story of Ed Gein, noted grave robber, murderer, and maker of extremely odd furniture, who was also known to have a rather unhealthy attachment to his dead mother.
5a56c495561eb_download(2).jpg.9f356a0be8a76bf9ea904fa50a6f75b8.jpg Gein died in a mental institution in '84. Whether he was haunted by his mother, or ever read or saw Psycho, and/or formed an opinion, is unrecorded.

Edited by Dr.Bedlam
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Awright, folks, this is not only trivia but a fun film school project.

This is our first selection: Dance Of The Damned. 220px-Dance_of_the_Damned.jpg.14ed4222e5b638d07926683845a1bad5.jpg

We have two protagonists: a vampire, and the dancer he's obsessing on at the strip club where she works. The two of them begin interacting, and become aware of each other's nature: She realizes he's a vampire... and he's hungry. But he also discovers that she's a failed single mother who's lost her child in a custody battle, her life is going nowhere, and she's dancing on the edge of suicide because of this. And the entire movie is a character study between these two weirdly needy desperate people. Despite the rather misleading poster, it is NOT a love story or an erotic thriller. It's a psychological study that happens to involve a vampire. And it was fascinating when I saw it 30 years ago.

Now here's our second selection, To Sleep With A Vampire.

5a56ca6786fe3_MV5BMTkzNjM2Mjg3MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMDMxODMyMQ@@._V1_UX182_CR00182268_AL_.jpg.9bd907f10e1a969c9555b816e0d5586d.jpg This movie was made four years after DWTD. Completely different casts, sets, everything. Same script. There are differences; some scenes' dialogue are a little different; I don't know if it was rewritten or if the actors were improvising. Some technical directions and camera angles are changed. Scott Valentine plays his vampire rather differently from Cyril O'Reilly, even when reciting the same dialogue. 

If you find yourself wanting to see how two entirely different companies and groups of actors make pretty much the same movie, all "Compare And Contrast," it's a fascinating experience.

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15 hours ago, Darsc Zacal said:

There are more fake flamingos in the world than real flamingos.

 

IMG_1127.JPG

 

I'm not sure whether to be depressed or not. There are a hell of a lot of plastic flamingos out there.

Recently, I succumbed to old bad habits and bought blind boosters of poorly painted figures again. HeroClix's Star Trek Away Team game is currently circulating the original series, and I fell hard last month. And I stopped on the way home from work and bought another couple of boosters, still hoping to snag the elusive Shahnah the Drill Thrall or the extremely rare Gorn. Regrettably, I did not, although Kor was a worthy addition to my collection. However, I was a bit confused by the Klingon Captains.

If you're looking to build a Star Trek battleforce, the game is great for figures; several types and poses of Original Series Klingons and Romulans are available, and several are quite common. I believe that the Klingon Captain is an uncommon; he's a workable leader if you can't get Koloth, Kang, or Kor.

Anyway, the boosters had two of them... but not the same. The second one was rather confusing.

KlingonCaptain.jpg.d7352d081eac9564751a899e55c2ae0a.jpg At left, we have the more traditional Klingon Captain, set number #21, cost 60 points, with the Klingon Empire team symbol on his dial. However, the other one struck me as a bit odd. His dial clearly reads Klingon Captain, his set number is 21, his point cost is 60... but as clearly visible, he has a Federation team symbol superimposed over the Klingon trefoil. Furthermore, he looks about as Klingon as ... Dr. McCoy. The card included with the booster was ... Dr. McCoy, and the stats inside the dial are McCoy's; I'm not sure any Klingon has healing abilities.

So... it's Dr. McCoy. Disguised as a Klingon Captain.

 DeForest Kelley, wherever you are, I hope you're laughing.

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19 hours ago, Darsc Zacal said:

There are more fake flamingos in the world than real flamingos.

 

IMG_1127.JPG

 

Don Featherstone, the inventor of the plastic flamingo, was awarded the 1996 Ig Nobel prize in Art for his contribution to ornamental evolution.

 

He was so proud of his award he and his wife attended nearly every Ig Nobel award ceremony afterwards until his death. The year he died the award ceremony included a moment of silence for him as a pink light-up flamingo was carried to the top of the auditorium and lit in his honor. It was beautiful.

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8 hours ago, Pezler the Polychromatic said:

In case you ever needed to gird your loins for battle or for planting petunias:

 

Gird-Up-Your-Loins-2.jpg

Hey, I've done that before!

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 The 1950 movie The Wooden Horse tells the story of an escape attempt from Stalag Luft 3, a German POW camp during WWII - the same camp that would later be immortalized in the film The Great Escape, which was about a much more massive escape attempted nearly two years later.

 

Famed British actor Peter Butterworth, star of the Carry On movies, had auditioned for a part in The Wooden Horse, but was told he "didn't look convincingly heroic or athletic enough" by the filmmakers.

 

In 1943,  Lt. Butterworth of the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm had been one of the prisoners at Stalag Luft 3 who had aided in the escape depicted in that film.

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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3 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 The 1950 movie The Wooden Horse tells the story of an escape attempt from Stalag Luft 3, a German POW camp during WWII - the same camp that would later be immortalized in the film The Great Escape, which was about a much more massive escape attempted nearly two years later.

 

Famed British actor Peter Butterworth, star of the Carry On movies, had auditioned for a part in The Wooden Horse, but was told he "didn't look convincingly heroic or athletic enough" by the filmmakers.

 

In 1943,  Lt. Butterworth of the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm had been one of the prisoners at Stalag Luft 3 who had aided in the escape depicted in that film.

 

 

 

A lot of real soldiers and heroes don't look heroic enough to film makers.

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They had to tone down Audie Murphy's heroics in the movie of his life, as it seemed too unbelievable.

 

Incidentally, Murphy was skinny and rather short, and didn't look heroic at all.

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Montana has sapphires. Most tend to be pastel colors, but some are a deep blue. On very rare occasion a ruby has been found. The mines were in high gear originally for small sapphires to make watch bearings, but slowed down when synthetic sapphires became prevalent. Now they're mined for tourists and gem fanatics. They're from a somewhat funky deposit; they're from an igneous source instead of a metamorphic one. A lot of them have been etched or tumbled, so they're small round pebbles that look a bit like candy. 

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 According to the National Center for Atmospheric research, an average cumulus cloud (the big fluffy ones seen on sunny days) has a water density of half a gram per cubic meter and a volume of around one billion cubic meters.

 

Therefore, each giant fluffy cloud floating in the sky weighs in at around 1.1 million pounds....

 

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20 hours ago, Zink said:

 

A lot of real soldiers and heroes don't look heroic enough to film makers.

 

Strangely enough,  the French thought otherwise.

Together with Norwegian actors and crews they made;

Operation Swallow: The Battle for Heavy Water

With most of the original saboteurs playing themselves, 

Suicide Mission

About the 'Shetland bus', the fishing boats that crossed from Norway to Scotland and back during the war, bringing refugees one way, and weapons and supplies the other way. They even towed minisubs once, to attack the tirpitz. 

captain Leif Larsen and many of his crew played themselves. 

 

Norway's most popular knitted sweater (the knitting pattern has sold over 3million copies... ) is the Marius sweater;

Marius2.PNG.ae1e64757e96d076cd4dcb225dd3cc44.PNG

(cover of the booklet with the knitting pattern)

Which was popularised by actor Marius Eriksen when he wore it in a 1954 comedy.  

Marius Eriksen fled Norway from Ålesund in November 1940 (fishing vessel... ) and made his way to 'Little Norway'  in Canada where he was trained as a fighter pilot. He then flew Spitfire first for the 331, then the 332 and had 9 confirmed kills before he was shot down in a head to head with a FW 190, and ended up in Stalag Luft III...   

The last movie he acted in was as 'Colonel Marius Eriksen' in Slalåm under Himmelen ('Slalom under Heaven'), a 1957 military movie.

and while it may sound as if it's about downhill skiing(Marius was Norwegian champion in 'alpine skiing' in 1947 and 48) it's about flying Thunderjets. 

(I've never seen it, and IMDB is pretty much blank on it)

 

Edited by Gadgetman!
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