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Reaperbryan

Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

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On the various Star Trek sets, various pipes and conduits are labeled with GNDN, a number and a color code. GNDN was both a bit of a joke, and also to let the builders know that that pipe goes nowhere and does nothing. 

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I wish I could remember the episode where an okudagram can be clearly seen that incorporates Pac Man, dots, and several ghosts. Prolly even easier to see in HD.

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

I wish I could remember the episode where an okudagram can be clearly seen that incorporates Pac Man, dots, and several ghosts. Prolly even easier to see in HD.

 

This one?

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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1 hour ago, Dr. Wyrm said:

i knew this. its one of my favorite facts.

 

When I first heard it, I assumed it was because the band was a buncha demanding showbiz jerks. I was rather surprised to find that the band had nothing to do with it. 

There's plenty of bizarre examples... Jennifer Lopez, for example, requires a relaxation area decorated entirely in white.

Weird Al Yankovic required a new Hawaiian shirt, to keep, at each venue; his collection, I am told, numbers in the hundreds.

Katy Perry's drivers are forbidden to speak to her or look at her except to ask questions about where to go.

Slipknot requires "6 cans of Chef Boyardee ravioli, 1 large bag of assorted Starburst fruit chews, 6 assorted cans of Campbell’s chunky soup, box of baby wipes, 12 pairs of white tube socks."

The late Amy Winehouse required Absolut Vodka, a selection of beers, and a sign for the door reading "Only Big Boys May Enter."

Iggy Pop is known to have requested seven "little people" dressed like the dwarves in a certain cartoon film. It is unclear if he got them or not.

Any venue hosting the Beatles was required to have a TV set and some Coca Cola.

... and at speaking engagements, Dick Cheney required all TV sets at the venue to be tuned to Fox News.

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The existence of the "Cthulhu Mythos" is questionable.

61ersdryWHL._SY355_.jpg.854269e1f11d9800100cd645af6cf6f8.jpg Y'see, H.P. Lovecraft didn't go in for world building.

What Lovecraft DID do was write a bunch of stories using common elements, notably the Necronomicon, Arkham, Miskatonic University, Cthulhu, and Yog-Sothoth, who are mentioned in many of Lovecraft's works, although Cthulhu only appears once (The Call Of Cthulhu) and Yoggy never actually appears at all, although we do meet his offspring in The Dunwich Horror. But Lovecraft didn't stretch himself to put any internal consistency into these story elements, regarding them simply as tools to creepify with. 

Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith admired each other enough that they actually used each OTHER's creations in their stories; the Book Of Eibon and Tsathoggua were Smith's, whereas anything having to do with mad poets and/or Skelos was Howard's, and they cheerfully and knowingly borrowed from each other as part of a big mutual admiration society.Authors3.jpg.aafdd19c8e7b45e7c1e912dcc1064d23.jpg But, again, there wasn't any real consistency; they weren't planning Avengers movies, they were just having fun and selling stories to the pulps.

This changed with the coming of August Derleth.

 

A-2420349-1495929619-9151.jpeg.jpg.0988111dba6665ad687d1e645516ad9e.jpg Derleth was a BIG Lovecraft fan, going so far as to found Arkham House Publishing in order to reprint Lovecraft's work (and a fair amount of Howard's and Smith's as well). Furthermore, he managed to get access to Lovecraft's paperwork and unpublished/unfinished manuscripts, and reworked several of them into "posthumous collaborations," with both his and HPL's names on the finished products. In these works, he used the shared mentions of various gods and spooky books and grimoires to pull together a shared universe and cosmology... what would, in time, become the Cthulhu Mythos, and included such ideas that Lovecraft never intended or wrote about, such as Cthulhu and Hastur being brothers, the concepts of "good" and "evil" gods, and the whole elemental idea (Cthulhu being water, Ithaqua being air, Cthuga being fire, and so on).

The idea of the Cthulhu Mythos has persisted to the present day, and arguably added to the growing popularity of Lovecraft's work.

 

Call_of_Cthulhu_RPG_1st_ed_1981.jpg.cec9afb2f58204a3a9deed8c88468dd9.jpg

 

Weirdly enough, though, it's a BEAR to find most of Derleth's work these days, whether it has Lovecraft's name on it or not...

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 H.P. Lovecraft lived in Providence, R.I... His fans regularly make pilgrimages to his house, and the annual H.P. Lovecraft fan convention, the NecronomiCon, is held there every year. During that weekend, theaters all over the city show the various movies that have been made of or based on his works.

 

One year, however, it was held on the same weekend and at the same hotel as the national Rocky Horror Picture Show convention. Many people became confused as to which events happening that weekend belonged to which convention - a handful of people showed up to the Rocky Horror rave and the afterparty dressed as Lovecraft characters.

 

Fun times were had by all.

 

 

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Unlike Lovecraft, Terry Pratchett's ufinished works will never be finished by someone else, as the hard drive they were on was flattened by a steam roller.

 

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7 hours ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 H.P. Lovecraft lived in Providence, R.I... His fans regularly make pilgrimages to his house, and the annual H.P. Lovecraft fan convention, the NecronomiCon, is held there every year. During that weekend, theaters all over the city show the various movies that have been made of or based on his works.

 

One year, however, it was held on the same weekend and at the same hotel as the national Rocky Horror Picture Show convention. Many people became confused as to which events happening that weekend belonged to which convention - a handful of people showed up to the Rocky Horror rave and the afterparty dressed as Lovecraft characters.

 

Fun times were had by all.

 

 

 

I'd have paid to see that.

 

7 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

Unlike Lovecraft, Terry Pratchett's ufinished works will never be finished by someone else, as the hard drive they were on was flattened by a steam roller.

 

 

I'd have paid to see that, too.

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Unfortunately, it seems that no one decided to record the event, and there's only a couple of cell-phone pictures of it.

It was a 6.5Ton vintage steamroller named 'Lord Jericho' that was used.

 

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Next time you're in the Forgotten Realms? Check out a Festhall.

 

Ed Greenwood began creating the Realms when he was eight years old. Presumably, he did not think to add brothels until he was a little older.

 

When he sold his setting and 20 years of notes and maps to TSR for use as a D&D setting, editor Jeff Grubb noted the number and variety of brothels in Waterdeep, among other places.

 

This was a problem. The D&D brand had taken a beating due to accusations of satanism, bad morals, and general evil, and was veering in a more kid friendly direction. But removing all the cathouses meant rekeying all the maps...

 

Grubb solved the issue by coining the word "festhall," and implying it was actually something similar to a day spa with dancing and a buffet. Which actually sorta describes at least one strip joint of my experience... but at least the kiddies wouldn't be setting off their parents and teachers by asking "What's a brothel?"

 

Grubb has gone on record as noting his irritation when the word "festhall" turns up in non-Realms fantasy novels...

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Couldn't he have done as every archeologist throughout time has done when they come across something that doesn't fit their world view?  

call it ceremonial... 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

Grubb solved the issue by coining the word "festhall," and implying it was actually something similar to a day spa with dancing and a buffet. Which actually sorta describes at least one strip joint of my experience... but at least the kiddies wouldn't be setting off their parents and teachers by asking "What's a brothel?"

So he knocked the e off the end of the german?

 

A Festhalle in German is sort of like a concert hall or performance venue. Usually owned by the town, but shows and plays and things can be booked there. By way of example here's the one in Frankfurt, which has had that name since long before D&D was a thing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festhalle_Frankfurt

 

Most are not this big or impressive.

Edited by Werkrobotwerk
edit this is the tell me things thread and I should tell you things
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