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Reaperbryan

Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

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On 4/17/2018 at 2:00 PM, Zink said:

When I was writing, grumbling about the amount of snow on my farm compared to everywhere else I thought of this. My farm is located on the continental divide. Generally when thinking of the continental divide we think of the high mountains. Here we have big hills and fairly high elevation. Roughly 1 km (3300 feet) above sea level. The water on part of my land flows north east, theoretically to the rivers connecting to Hudson's Bay. On the other side of the hill the water makes a fairly quick trip to the Missouri river and then on to the Gulf of Mexico. 

 

The area where my farm is is the 2nd highest elevation in Canada between the Laurentian mountains in Quebec and Rockies in Alberta. We're actually only a few meters lower elevation than the highest point of the Laurentians. The Highest point on the canadian prairies is the Cypress Hills which are located about 300 km west of me. The two areas are actually a continuation of a long long range of hills with their highest point in in South eastern Alberta that gradually get lower and lower the farther east they go disappearing in south east Saskatchewan. The Geography and topography of this long ridge was formed during the last ice age. This area was were the last glaciers stopped when pushing south. Further east the last glaciers continued on into the american plains. 

 

It's possible that I've mentioned this in this thread before but if so it was long enough ago (in internet time) that it might as well not have happened:

 

There is a place in Minnesota where there is a triple continental divide. The water to the north flows eventually into the Mackenzie River and the Arctic Ocean, the water to the east flows through Lake Superior and eventually the St. Lawrence into the Atlantic, and the water to the south flows into the Mississippi River and down to the Gulf of Mexico.

 

There's nothing particularly spectacular about the place. And it's not even clear exactly where it is, because the ground there is pretty flat, but the place exists.

 

(For more on triple divides in North America, see https://www.uh.edu/engines/epi2634.htm ).

 

On 4/19/2018 at 8:58 PM, Boaz said:

 At least your not typing it out in 1888 ...

 

1888TypeWright.thumb.jpg.1011ff68e3344314ba7b9ecd9932a055.jpg

 

That ad refers to something that many people misunderstand.

 

The QWERTY keyboard is often said to have been created to slow people's typing down to the point where the machine could keep up. Nothing could be further from the truth. In the 19th century, speed typing contests were a big thing, and each typewriter manufacturer had its own techniques to increase the typist's speed, in part to gain the publicity attending upon winning these sorts of contests. The QWERTY style keyboard was quite successful in these contests, and eventually became the standard as a result.

 

Much of the bad press attached to the QWERTY arrangement was the result of the attempts of a certain August Dvorak to sell his own keyboard the the US government. Early on, his keyboard won several typing competitions against the QWERTY keyboard. I'm sure it's just a coincidence that all those competitions were arranged and judged by Dvorak and that independent tests have shown no significant advantages for his keyboard.

 

On 5/27/2018 at 7:39 PM, Dr.Bedlam said:

Hah? Whasdat? London Bridge isn't falling down; it wasn't falling down when I was a child, and according to this webcam off the Thames, it's still right where I left it. What's up with this rhyme? Well, if you check Wikipedia, you get a variety of different answers:

 

London Bridge (the one that was there from 1830 to 1969 anyway, there have been several) was taken down, the pieces numbered carefully, and then shipped to Arizona and faithfully reassembled across the Colorado River in Lake Havasu City. Well, to be fair, the skin pieces were reassembled faithfully on a more modern bridge design to look like the original bridge, but there you go. It's quite likely that describing at least one of its predecessors as "falling down" might have been entirely appropriate, though I have no actual evidence on that count.

Edited by Doug Sundseth
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5 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

London Bridge (the one that was there from 1830 to 1969 anyway, there have been several) was taken down, the pieces numbered carefully, and then shipped to Arizona and faithfully reassembled across the Colorado River in Lake Havasu City. Well, to be fair, the skin pieces were reassembled faithfully on a more modern bridge design to look like the original bridge, but there you go. It's quite likely that describing at least one of its predecessors as "falling down" might have been entirely appropriate, though I have no actual evidence on that count.

 

...I am fairly sure that the children's nursery rhyme predates 1969... if only because I predate 1969.

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6 hours ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

...I am fairly sure that the children's nursery rhyme predates 1969... if only because I predate 1969.

 

More to the point, it looks like it predates 1830, with some reports saying it supposedly predates 1830 by more than a century. So, while neither the current nor previous London Bridge has ever been "falling down", that is unlikely to be related to the source of the rhyme. And I don't think the version torn down for the 1830 bridge still has a webcam pointed at it. Could be wrong, I suppose.

 

:rolleyes:

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

More to the point, it looks like it predates 1830, with some reports saying it supposedly predates 1830 by more than a century. So, while neither the current nor previous London Bridge has ever been "falling down", that is unlikely to be related to the source of the rhyme. And I don't think the version torn down for the 1830 bridge still has a webcam pointed at it. Could be wrong, I suppose.

 

:rolleyes:

Yes, The London Bridge that is now in America is later than the bridge referred to in the "London Bridge is Falling Down" rhyme. The bridge being sung about is probably this one:

 

london-bridge-1024x392.thumb.jpg.05ad1cf91519bba5cd27690b8882ea0c.jpg

 

 This bridge is know to have suffered at least 6 fires in the 17th.century (Not surprising when you consider the buildings on it) and required many repairs, so it would seem to fit in well with many of the verses in the childrens' rhyme.

 

 

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Allergies, there are some weird ones out there:

 

Water Allergy or Aquagenic Urticaria is an actual thing, most sufferers only have issues with water touching their skin, it causes hives, intense itching and skin flushing.  A few unlucky people also have problems if they drink it.....

 

Allergy to Touch or Dermatographic Urticaria,  where even a light touch will cause puffiness and redness on the skin. You can literally write on the skin.

 

Allergy to Exercise, Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis (EIA), where physical activity causes hives, flushing,  wheezing, nausea, abdominal cramps, diarrhea.  This can be fatal if the airways closes from the swelling.

 

Allergy to Cold, or Cold Urticaria, where your skin gets blisters and hives of it gets in contact with cold water or air.  It can be fatal due to anaphylactic shock if the entire body gets exposed at once, like when falling into a cold body of water or running out of hot water in the shower.

 

The above makes a runny nose from pollen allergies seem like nothing.

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Following up on my acquisition post where I bought a Dimetrodon ( a toy to repaint, I couldnt' find a real one).

 

Despite common belief and merchandise from certain movies, these are NOT Dinosaurs.

Even though some carry a name ending in Saurus..( which means Lizard).

These animals were extinct way before the arrival of the Dinosaurs.

 

Dimetrodon and itś relatives were synapsids and probably endothermic.

Closer related to mammals and reptiles and not to Dinosaurs who are an entirely different group.

 

I actually bought the toy from Schleich and it was in a toy store presented on a display from Jurassic World among Dinosaurs.

I love history, I love nature.

Please teach kids what is what.

I might sound geeky, but scientists have spent years to classify animals and plants only to see Hollywood throw them into a large heap and call them all by the same name despite millions of years between the species.

 

I love to use fantasy dinos, I will paint unfeathered Raptors next to feathered ones ( I'm converting some as we speak into feathered ones) Heck, I'll stik wings to a Dino and call it a Dragon if I want too.

But I would like people to at least know the truth about these things.

 

Also, I love these creatures.

I need more miniatures/toys to paint/repaint like these.

 

AAARRRROOOO!!!!

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.67616da6b37a01739c8930da0dc19c29.png

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This one was a bit of a jolt.

 

660524_v2.jpg.35bb09342490e73b1d33f72331e91629.jpg Tell you right now, I can NOT imagine Billy Idol as the Terminator. Brain won't accept it. 

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A raccoon climbed 23 stories up the outside of the UBS building in Minnesota, just to get caught in a cage with a can of cat food.

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

This one was a bit of a jolt.

 

660524_v2.jpg.35bb09342490e73b1d33f72331e91629.jpg Tell you right now, I can NOT imagine Billy Idol as the Terminator. Brain won't accept it. 

 

Aha! I knew the elves were responsible.

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5 hours ago, Werkrobotwerk said:

A raccoon climbed 23 stories up the outside of the UBS building in Minnesota, just to get caught in a cage with a can of cat food.

 

Durn good thing, too. I wondered like hell how the poor thing was going to get back DOWN.

And now she's going to think ALL those tall concrete things might have cat food on top....

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

Durn good thing, too. I wondered like hell how the poor thing was going to get back DOWN.

And now she's going to think ALL those tall concrete things might have cat food on top....

 

I saw that on the news. Those Minnesotans are sure kindly to Racoons. They wandered out into the countryside and let it scamper away. 

 

I trapped four (or maybe five) of the little critters last year. Animal control in these here parts just assumes the little beasts carry rabies and they are dealt with accordingly. Poor things. And it is a crime to take one out into the county somewhere and let it loose. Rural residents don’t take kindly to having potentially rabid critters set free on their land.  

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 2011-05-20-gazebo2.thumb.jpg.26d57ad4aaca092d0cfeec7156bf15f4.jpgThis'z Knights Of The Dinner Table, a long running strip about a mob of tabletop gamers in Indiana. Creator Jolly Blackburn insists that they are fictional... but not by much. The strip got started in the old SHADIS magazine, and ran in Dragon Magazine for years, before finally settling at Kenzerco, where it became its own monthly magazine. This strip is one of the earlier ones, and chronicles the infamous incident of the Gazebo. The censor bars are mine, for to not offend or provoke the mods.

Anyway, the staff at KODT magazine were all gamers themselves, and recalled fondly the way Dragon Magazine used to publish spoof articles every April. So they decided to do one of their own... Russian mail order gamer brides!

2013-01-15-001.jpg.1a2916deb84c0d81ea81435ec11e0fb3.jpg The young lady in the photo was, if I recall correctly, a student who'd worked for them as an intern for a while. And everyone had a good laugh about it.

...until the communications began coming in. Apparently, whoever was on that 1800 number had no idea what everyone was talking about. Was it a typo? WHERE ARE THE RUSSIAN GAMER BABES?

And they wound up having to publish a retraction for what was supposed to have been a joke...

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On that note...

 

the original run run of commercials for Ghostbusters was mostly the commercial that is played in the actual movie that gets Dana (Sigourney Weaver's character) to call about the happenings in her apartment, except the fact that it used a working 800 number instead of giving a 555 dead line number (and had the obligatory release details for the movie at the end).  Said 800 number was actually owned by the production company

and would give details about the movie when called. 

 

Tommy TuTone found out the hard way that you don't use an actual phone number in popular media as well, but that may be a story best left for another

day. 

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