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Hey there, I'm very new to sculpting, and i was hoping for some advice in removing the "seams" that show up when you add a new blob of greenstuff onto your model, I've been using Vaseline, and a small slightly rounded steel dental tool for the bulk of my sculpt, i can get most of the height difference to go away, but the seam is still visible, I'm mostly trying to blend it into other soft green stuff underneath it, i don't have too much trouble blending a soft layer into a cured layer,  any advice, tips or techniques 

 

Also, I appreciate all the great tips I've already found on the forum, its saved me from having to do a lot of trial and error on my own

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The problem I run into there would be that would make sculpting a single leg take me hours, I've been adding green stuff bit by bit in the shape of muscles, so if each time i wanted to add more green stuff I let a muscle group cure, just doing the calf would take me 6+ hours accounting for cure time

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It depends what you mean you say you're new to sculpting. If you're really a newbie, you might want to join Miniature Sculpting Noobs or The Hobby Hangout on Facebook, but I've also seen people who say "hey this is my first ever miniature" and immediately produce a photo of a sculpt that could only have come from an experienced artist.

 

I would say, don't worry about blending, that's something you don't need to know how to do for a long time, it's more important just to get the size and shape of the body parts right. Blending is relatively simple and it can be a distraction from making a symmetrical and correctly proportioned figure.

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I believe many sculptors have more than one project going at any time, so that they can work on another, a third or even a fourth while the first dries... 

 

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