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Dr.Bedlam

The Dark Age Of Super Heroes

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We have only watched the first season of Flash, but we enjoyed it.

 

The characters stopped and explained things to each other, mostly. So they didn't go and do the stupid.

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44 minutes ago, PaganMegan said:

We have only watched the first season of Flash, but we enjoyed it.

 

The characters stopped and explained things to each other, mostly. So they didn't go and do the stupid.

 

“Barry Has Three Daddies”

 

loved how when Barry told Joe-Dad about his powers Joe didn’t get all skeptical or disbelieving or mad or anything. He laughed and was delighted.

 

I also love how Bad-Dad was revealed to the audience from the start. And my god, Cisco’s big scene with Bad-Dad was devastating.

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5 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

I gave up on mainstream comics a long time ago.

And when I heard about 'collectors issues' where they had several versions of the same comic, but with different covers, I KNEW that the mainstream comic storytelling was not just dead and buried, but had been dug out by liches who had gone on to Elf it Hard in the number 2 orifice, without lubricants...     

 

They've recovered. Sort of. They went through a period where both DC and Marvel were doing some world-ending crossover event that spanned 18 different books and required you to buy all of them for things to make sense for a while, but I think that finally petering out, too. Thankfully. Because it went on for like a decade, and it seemed like it happened every 6 months. At times they'd be running two of those events at the same time, so if you just bought your normal books you'd get so confused as to what was going on that it wasn't any fun at all.

 

Quote

And these days when Diamond is trying to kill off the small, established FLGS and comics stores... 

(Forcing them to order obscene amounts of 'special' editions with foil-covered, fingerpainted or whatever's the 'rage' covers to get a decent stock of normal issues that the comic book READERS wants... )

 

A friend of mine that owns a comic shop has actually said that it's not Diamond doing that, it's the publishers. Primarily, from what he says, it's Marvel doing that now. He actually did a breakdown for one of the Marvel books that did it, I think it was Thor.

 

It was something like this - In order to get any of Cover B, you had to order 5 of Cover A, which was the normal cover. But you only got 1 of Cover B for every 5 of Cover A. If you wanted Cover C, you had to order a minimum of 25 of Cover A, but then you could order up to 10 of Cover C. If you wanted Cover D, you had to put in an order for 50 of Cover A, and you could get 1 of Cover D. To get Cover E, you had to put in a minimum order of 100 issues total. If you put in an order for 100 of Cover A, then you qualified to get 1 of Cover F as well. Once you hit 300 total issues, then you qualified to get 5 copies of Cover G. The list went on.

 

They had like 10 different covers for that book, and in all likelihood my FLCS would never qualify for half of them unless he wanted to massively over order. It was so phenomenally stupid. And he said that Marvel has been doing that for a while now.

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The main problem with their Killing Joke adaptation was that the story was simply too short to make even a 75 minute film out of it (it would've made a great longer short to build another Showcase set around, had they not already killed that line by expecting people to buy a collection of things they had already included on other films).

 

Giving Bruce Timm an outlet for his obsession with coupling up various characters was merely a rather sad and yucky side effect.

And it doesn't help that they keep wanting to make these films with an R rating in mind.

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Killing Joke was among the best Batman stories ever written... because it gives us a look into what made the Joker. And I can appreciate why they needed to expand the story to fill time, but I'd as soon have had a Jonah Hex short tacked on, as have to suffer a prologue where our characters ... are wildly out of character. So to speak. Alan Moore has expressed regrets for putting Batgirl through the wringer as a plot device to torture her father, but I fail to see where having her suddenly develop the hots for Batman represents an improvement. 

Marvel's publishing division has never recovered, I think, from the seventies and eighties and the original Marvel Zombies, the kids who lined up at the comic shop or the drugstore and bought one of every Marvel title. This was feasible when they were 35 cents, but I quit reading comics on a regular basis when they passed a buck each, and what are they now? Three bucks, five bucks a title? No wonder they want us to buy them digitally.

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From what I can see of the Marvel Comics App, it's an hostage app. 

You need the app to read the contents, and the contents is stored on their servers, and streamed to your device.

You can have 6 or 12 'offline' comics downloaded to your app, but that's all. 

(Their FAQ is rather vague. First it states 12, then further down it says 6)

 

If they decide to cancel the service or go out of business, you lose the contents. 

 

I really try to stay away from these kinds of services. 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Pingo said:

I miss the awesome Ma and Pa Kent of the “Lois and Clark” TV show.

 

 

That show was on Saturday nights when I was of a partying and womanizing age, if I ever found myself in position where I was able to watch it I considered that I was failing at life.

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Just now, Beagle said:

 

That show was on Saturday nights when I was of a partying and womanizing age, if I ever found myself in position where I was able to watch it I considered that I was failing at life.

 

I have spent every Saturday night since I was eighteen playing D&D* with my friends.

 

(Fortunately there was this technological wonder called a VCR ... )

 

 

 

 

 

*”D&D” is a stand-in term for just about every major RPG and many minor ones, plus homebrews, with the occasional board game in the mix. Also “every” Saturday night is a stand-in for “very nearly every, barring vacations, illness, and the odd wedding”)

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2 minutes ago, Pingo said:

 

I have spent every Saturday night since I was eighteen playing D&D* with my friends.

 

(Fortunately there was this technological wonder called a VCR ... )

 

*”D&D” is a stand-in term for just about every major RPG and many minor ones, plus homebrews, with the occasional board game in the mix. Also “every” Saturday night is a stand-in for “very nearly every, barring vacations, illness, and the odd wedding”)

Good Lord. 

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On 1/4/2018 at 2:28 PM, Pingo said:

 

I have spent every Saturday night since I was eighteen playing D&D* with my friends.

 

(Fortunately there was this technological wonder called a VCR ... )

 

 

 

 

 

*”D&D” is a stand-in term for just about every major RPG and many minor ones, plus homebrews, with the occasional board game in the mix. Also “every” Saturday night is a stand-in for “very nearly every, barring vacations, illness, and the odd wedding”)

Sounds like my preferred lifestyle, right there. ::):

 

I was never really into drinking and partying - though I think it is fair to say that when I first started dating Megan (and even a bit before*) my drinking increased twelevefold! Going from a six pack a year to a six pack a month.... Now it is back down to normal levels. ::P:

 

The Auld Grump

 

* I am pretty sure that a whole lot of the time I spent not-dating Megan was really dating - and the only person fooled was me. Fooled by both Megan and myself.

 

*EDIT* Where does Batman - The Animated Series fall on the darkness scale? It was certainly darker and grittier than the Adam West Batman series, to say nothing of The Justice League Super Friends series, or that... horrible thing with Bat Mite....

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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2 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

 

*EDIT* Where does Batman - The Animated Series fall on the darkness scale? It was certainly darker and grittier than the Adam West Batman series, to say nothing of The Justice League Super Friends series, or that... horrible thing with Bat Mite....

Mostly slightly less dark than this:

 

 

The episode “The Demon’s Quest” is one of my favorite portrayals of the character, and one of the only good adaptations of Ra’s al-Ghul out there.

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On 1/4/2018 at 11:28 AM, Gadgetman! said:

From what I can see of the Marvel Comics App, it's an hostage app. 

You need the app to read the contents, and the contents is stored on their servers, and streamed to your device.

You can have 6 or 12 'offline' comics downloaded to your app, but that's all. 

(Their FAQ is rather vague. First it states 12, then further down it says 6)

 

If they decide to cancel the service or go out of business, you lose the contents. 

 

I really try to stay away from these kinds of services. 

 

Eeeeyeah, you an' me both. They've issued comics on CD roms, but apparently the idea of releasing digital content these days is akin to inviting piracy. Or something. At any rate, if I'm paying for it, it needs to be stored on my device or my media. No? Then I don't really own it, and therefore, I don't own it, I'm just paying RENT on it. But I am old, of the ancient generations where you used to own physical copies of stuff...

 

On 1/4/2018 at 12:24 PM, Beagle said:

 

That show was on Saturday nights when I was of a partying and womanizing age, if I ever found myself in position where I was able to watch it I considered that I was failing at life.


I was married with a child at the time. If I tried to go drink and womanize, they would hit me. So we watched Lois & Clark, a much sunnier show than the current grimdark incarnation of the characters. I liked it, and felt that their incarnations of Ma and Pa Kent were reasonably updated versions of the originals. For that matter, Smallville wasn't bad. And then, Zack Snyder has to turn the Kents into Ayn Rand, for some reason...

Batman: The Animated Series was certainly darker than previous incarnations, but at least he wasn't branding crooks with red hot batarangs, for potato's sake. It did lead directly to Batman Beyond, Beware: The Batman, and The Brave And The Bold, in which someone was trying to channel Batman in the Silver Age. It was well done, but not quite to my taste.

 

 

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2 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

Where does Batman - The Animated Series fall on the darkness scale? It was certainly darker and grittier than the Adam West Batman series, to say nothing of The Justice League Super Friends series, or that... horrible thing with Bat Mite....

 

Batman: TAS is generally considered by comic fans to be the quintessential Batman. It doesn't descend into Broody Bat-God, it isn't a terrible and grimdark version of the character, and it doesn't devolve into camp comedy. It has its moments of everything, and it did a good job of telling classic Batman stories in the span of 30 minutes to an hour. On top of that, it also reinvented or introduced characters in ways that weren't stupid.

 

Generally, the same can be said about all of the Bruce Timm-Paul Dini works of the 90's and early 2000's that make up the wider DC Animated Universe. Superman: The Animated Series was great, Justice League was great, and Batman: Beyond was a wonderful look at a Batman that wasn't Bruce Wayne(and it's the reason I wish they would retire Bruce in the comics too). Sure, they've got problem episodes that fall flat, as every show will have, but taken as a whole they're good shows. However, despite being someone who is co-credited for their successes, Bruce Timm's biggest contribution was the art style, which works wonderfully for a cartoon. That's not to diminish the effect that the art has on a show's reception, but Paul Dini and Alan Burnett are responsible for some of the best episodes of the shows as writers. The writer's room for all 4 of those shows was something else.

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Don't forget their work on the Superman cartoon, which while being lighter than the BTAS show, carried the characters and setting effectively for a rather wide audience.

At least part of DC Comics' problem is the attempt to make the characters function BOTH for children and grownups. The DC Animated canon largely pulled this off, although I reserve judgment about The Brave And The Bold; perhaps a bit too meta for me. Hell, I even liked their Jonah Hex.

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3 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

Don't forget their work on the Superman cartoon, which while being lighter than the BTAS show, carried the characters and setting effectively for a rather wide audience.

At least part of DC Comics' problem is the attempt to make the characters function BOTH for children and grownups. The DC Animated canon largely pulled this off, although I reserve judgment about The Brave And The Bold; perhaps a bit too meta for me. Hell, I even liked their Jonah Hex.

Superman pretty much must be lighter than Batman...  Doesn't it?

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