Jump to content
Paradoxical Mouse

Mouse Tried Sculpting

Recommended Posts

Just now, rfusca said:

mini market has good sci fi terrain too.Including crates.

Thanks, but not exactly the style. :) I'll just stick to sculpting. Also, don't forget - no commerce links on the forums! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

Thanks, but not exactly the style. :) I'll just stick to sculpting. Also, don't forget - no commerce links on the forums! 

OOoops

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For barrels you can take two soda bottle tops and and glue them together.  Then you can add a thin layer of putty to smooth things out.  They would be large barrels.  Asl peope to save them for you, or just grab lids out of the recycle bin at the FLGS or work.  I find plenty there.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 Probably the easiest way to do barrels and crates, as mentioned, is to find preexisting shapes and then modify them. You can find all sorts of interesting shapes if you think outside the box - for example,  as Dilvish said caps for things like soda or shampoo bottles make excellent armatures for barrel-like containers and a 1/2-inch wooden dowel cut into 5/8-in. sections makes an excellent 55-gallon drum.  You just cover them in enough greenstuff to disguise their true nature, and then when it's cured you sculpt on detains like surface texture, barrel hoops or supports, or maybe a small digital readout box, etc., depending on the tech level of the container.

Places like Michael's sell all sorts of tiny wooden shapes - some of them are blank, some of them are painted and some of them need to be rescued from other objects that they're part of. You can also find lots of different little bits of stuff you can repurpose to represent sci-fi barrels and crates by digging around in the toy and craft aisles at the local Goodwill Store.

 

As far as sculpting barrels and crates...  If you're not going to use another object as an armature then you need to rough out the basic shape first, let it cure, then add another layer of greenstuff to make the surface detail. I'd suggest getting some of the cheaper putty like Milliput or Sculpey and finding a couple of objects in different sizes that you can use as a mold - for example, a strip of the little plastic paint pots you find at the dollar stores, the inside of the aforementioned shampoo caps, or even a sturdy plastic insert from a box of chocolates or anything else with little compartments in it*  - and make a bunch of generic basic shapes. Once they're cured, you can then add the second layer of putty and cut in any surface details like texture, holes, or lines for panel edges. Once that's cured, then you add on anything that sticks out from the surface, such as barrel hoops or rivets/bolts/etc. When adding things like straps or bands to an object or character, the most important thing is to get them nice and straight and of even thickness all the way around. (I usually measure with a ruler if I can.)

If you're going to have a barrel or container with an intricate top like the one in the image, if you're not going to be casting them it may or may not be easier to trace the outline of the container on a piece of paper or something, and then sculpt the lid separately. Again, build it up from basic shapes first and then add the details.

 

And, as always, when making something from putty, always work on smoothing and blending the surfaces and edges of your pieces.

 

* (When using objects as a mold, always make sure you use something as a mold release agent (vaseline, Pam cooking spray, etc.), and it's often helpful to stick a piece of wire into the middle of the object when filling the mold so you have something to pull it out of the mold with after it's cured. Clip off the wire after you remove the shape from the mold. Make sure the end of the wire inside the putty is bent so that the wire doesn't just pull straight out. )

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone! I have a ton of 2-liters scattered around my apartment! That's perfect for the barrels! I'll have to look for some scrap boxes around...(maybe some blister packs can help me...)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got any LEGOs around? You can build a mold for all sorts of square and rectangular shapes, and the top and bottom surfaces of the pieces can be used for pressing in cool sci-fi-looking details.

 

Edited by Mad Jack
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

It's a good tutorial - I just would rather learn on inorganic shapes. To me, it is easier to go from inorganic to organic rather than the opposite. Thanks for the suggestion, though.

 

Except that green stuff is very difficult to create inorganic shapes in.  It takes more skill and practice with it to get the sharp edges.  If you want to work on inorganic things, get some Aves Apoxie Sculpt and mix that 1:1 with the green stuff.  That will give you a mixture that still handles a lot like GS, but take a sharp edge easier because it has much less memory that the gs alone.  Also, it cures hard and can later be files and sanded to give super sharp edges. If you follow any of my WIPs and tutorials on here, it is the light green putty I use.  You will note that I use it for almost all of my underpinning, using the GS only for the final detail layer.  For inorganic objects I don't even do that.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

 

Except that green stuff is very difficult to create inorganic shapes in.  It takes more skill and practice with it to get the sharp edges.  If you want to work on inorganic things, get some Aves Apoxie Sculpt and mix that 1:1 with the green stuff.  That will give you a mixture that still handles a lot like GS, but take a sharp edge easier because it has much less memory that the gs alone.  Also, it cures hard and can later be files and sanded to give super sharp edges. If you follow any of my WIPs and tutorials on here, it is the light green putty I use.  You will note that I use it for almost all of my underpinning, using the GS only for the final detail layer.  For inorganic objects I don't even do that.

Thanks! I'll order some Apoxie Sculpt and try that.

 

Additionally, I was finding I was having trouble getting the putty to smooth against my frame. Will the Apoxie Sculpt mixture help with that? Or is there something else I should do? It was a little easier when I got some petroleum jelly like I've seen mentioned on here, but still was almost impossible to get the putty to move once it was on the frame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe, I'm not sure what you mean though.  To apply the GS over something like the caps you have, I'd fill in the divots in the caps, then roll putty it into a sheet and  cover it with a sheet of already smooth putty that you can then adhere to the surface and smooth down. I don't do alot of "moving" of putty.  Typically I form a rough shape, put it in place, and then refine it until it is done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TaleSpinner said:

Maybe, I'm not sure what you mean though.  To apply the GS over something like the caps you have, I'd fill in the divots in the caps, then roll putty it into a sheet and  cover it with a sheet of already smooth putty that you can then adhere to the surface and smooth down. I don't do alot of "moving" of putty.  Typically I form a rough shape, put it in place, and then refine it until it is done.

That's probably my issue then. I just slapped it in without preshaping it, similar to what's done at the bottom of the putty catcher. What would you use to roll the putty into a sheet? Do you use your hands? I don't know what tool I would use for that...

 

Sorry if this is a lot of questions. I've sculpted a little in clay before, but my shapes were always terrible organically. I did decent inorganic shapes, though, which is why I thought I should start with inorganic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get good thin sheets by rolling into into a smooth ball in your hand and then pressing it between two jelly coated flat surfaces (I use two small ceramic coasters). Then let it cure for a few minutes like that and take the edge and pry it up with a pick tool. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rfusca said:

You can get good thin sheets by rolling into into a smooth ball in your hand and then pressing it between two jelly coated flat surfaces (I use two small ceramic coasters). Then let it cure for a few minutes like that and take the edge and pry it up with a pick tool. 

 

This, though I don't bother letting it cure. 

 

Just press and with a slicing motion under it, I ease it off the board with my dental spatula.

 

Old hotel cards with a thin coat of Vaseline work great.  I never turn mine in if they let me.  Plano type box dividers work even better.  Nothing sticks to the type of plastic they use in those.

 

 

Note on curing: I know a lot of people suggest letting the putty cure a bit after mixing; I don't.  Why?  Well the putty is at its stickiest right after you mix it.  At this point it is easiest to form your basic shapes and get them to adhere to the armature/model. If you wait, it won't stick quite as readily. By the time you get it formed and stuck, enough time will have passed that it will be perfect for refining and adding detail.  In this way you waste no precious sculpting time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

 

This, though I don't bother letting it cure. 

 

Just press and with a slicing motion under it, I ease it off the board with my dental spatula.

 

Old hotel cards with a thin coat of Vaseline work great.  I never turn mine in if they let me.  Plano type box dividers work even better.  Nothing sticks to the type of plastic they use in those.

 

 

Note on curing: I know a lot of people suggest letting the putty cure a bit after mixing; I don't.  Why?  Well the putty is at its stickiest right after you mix it.  At this point it is easiest to form your basic shapes and get them to adhere to the armature/model. If you wait, it won't stick quite as readily. By the time you get it formed and stuck, enough time will have passed that it will be perfect for refining and adding detail.  In this way you waste no precious sculpting time.

Mine is so mushy to start with if I don't let it cure some that it's almost impossible to work with. What ratio do you mix with, blue to yellow? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×