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NecroMancer

Cleaning flash of metal figs

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So I am going to painting up a metal figure soon and I am curious about cleaning it up.  

 

Should a certain type of file?  Diamond tip?  Just regular metal file?

 

Any other tips would be appreciated as well. 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, NecroMancer said:

So I am going to painting up a metal figure soon and I am curious about cleaning it up.  

 

Should a certain type of file?  Diamond tip?  Just regular metal file?

 

Any other tips would be appreciated as well. 

 

 

 

Mostly I use a sharp hobby knife to cut of excess flash and I scrape moldlines away with it.

 

Edited by Glitterwolf
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Use a hobby knife to remove the largest bits and follow up with a mini file.  Diamond files are nice but not absolutely necessary. 

 

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Xacto, then files, then possibly burnishing with a dull blade. Often I'm lazy and don't get everything, or there are areas that are really tough to reach and I skip those. I think I've used a diamond grit nail file when I couldn't find my usual files. I think some of the pros will wrap fine grit sand paper on a toothpick to get nooks and crannies. 

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i prefer the 67m microblade from MicroMark for stuff like that. It's smaller than most so can get into many nooks and crannies.

 

If you're really elfed about reaching the most inaccessible details, there's a trick a plastic modeller once showed me; you take a piece of thin piano-wire, bend it so that it can reach the area, dip the end in superglue, then in a fine abrasive powder. 

(sorry, so many years since I tried this trick that I can no longer remember where the powder came from or what it was. )

 

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There's a certain amount of choice and preference. I do almost all of my cleaning of metal figures with diamond files. When I started I used standard metal files, but prefer the diamond. (In both cases these are small files, 2mm diameter on the round holder edge.) I'm just more comfortable with that than a sharp blade for metal.

 

I like to scrape areas clean with a knife on resin, and slice mouldlines off with a scalpel on Bones. 

An alternate to the trick Gadgetman mentioned - you can fill in pock marks or level out next to hard to reach mouldlines with applications of sealer. Reaper Brush-on Sealer is easy to use for that. If an area is really deep or pocked, you can use gloss sealer. Gloss is a little trickier since it's thick enough that you can unintentionally add texture if you don't smooth out the edges with a brush. 

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I use a hobby knife to scrape and cut flash and mold lines. I use files to clean up any leftover mold lines. A friend of mine has tinier files than I do so I borrow those if mine are too bulky. (I need to invest in smaller files!) I have used the gloss sealer trick for areas that need a small fill or little smooth out that I couldn't fix with a file. I have also used fine grit sandpaper to slide into skinny spots.

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2 hours ago, Pezler the Polychromatic said:

For myself, I use a Micromark seam scraper.

Thoughts on it?  I've contemplated picking one up. 

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8 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

Thoughts on it?  I've contemplated picking one up. 

Amazing. Takes a little getting used to, but now I can't imagine working without it. Especially good for mold lines on Bones since it scrapes them away without leaving a burr, like files do.

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5 minutes ago, Pezler the Polychromatic said:

Amazing. Takes a little getting used to, but now I can't imagine working without it. Especially good for mold lines on Bones since it scrapes them away without leaving a burr, like files do.

Exactly what I was hoping to hear, thanks! 

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 I'm old-school - I use a Testor's hobby knife for almost everything from removing large chunks of metal to the tiniest mold lines on difficult areas like eyeballs... But then, I've been doing it for thirty years, so I'm pretty much a surgeon with the thing by now.

However, in recent years I've also acquired several sets of regular and diamond files.

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