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Jeepnewbie

Glue Acceleration

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In the past when I first started I used super glue, then just held the pieces in place. 

 

Years later when I was introduced into 40k, pinning, magnets, and accelerator. My first accelerator was zip kicker. The stuff was instant set and if you didn’t have the pieces lined up correctly it was a chore to get it corrected. Last year I finally ran out of the spray. So back to holding the pieces. Recently I found some accelerate at the local craft store. Store clerk said it worked on CA even though the bottle says APS products. The stuff does not work. I went back and found some CA stuff and it works better. It is the bsi bottle while not as fast as zip kicker it does give some working time. I did finally find a hobby store that carries a version of zip kicker. :lol:

 

Does anyone have a clue to what APS adhesive is?  I found a company but I can’t find any products at the craft store. 

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On a related theme I have not yet used superglue accelerator, (despite often being very tempted,) as I was told it made joints brittle and weak. Have you found that to be a problem?

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 As far as I can tell from a brief internet search, APS seems to be a packaging company that just provides the packaging materials for various adhesives, sealants and resins from various manufacturers.

I found an old post on Scale Auto Magazine's forum that seems to indicate that "Extreme Power" is Hobby Lobby's house brand, and the poster had a suspicion based on his experience that most accelerators may well all be the same stuff just bottled under different brands, for whatever that's worth...

 

 

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I do find the joints to be weaker than a standard set.  I have also noticed that the bond can be fluffy, almost like the CA foams in the bond, and that you can get a condition where the CA bonds to itself rather than to both sides of what it is supposed to be bonding to.

 

I have two suggestions to help:  I use the CA and accelerator to hold the piece in place.  Then after the initial bond is formed, i add an additional pour of thin CA to infuse into the bond and that seems to help strengthen the bond

 

The other thing I use is water.  Water is what triggers the CA bond process so by making the connecting surfaces damp (no standing water or the bond won't adhere) before adding the CA.  the water speeds the formation of the bond and once you get the hang of it, seems to result in a bond that is as strong as the normal bond and less chance of the CA not adhering or, in a worse case, never becoming a solid bond at all.  (I have found that if the pieces and the air are both very dry, there are times when the CA just won't turn into a solid on the piece until a little water is added.)

 

Just my two cents...

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I also find it to be a little weaker using zip kicker, with no accelerate its not as bad. On plastic it didn't make that much of a difference since pieces are lighter. I also do something similar to Kangaroorex as putting more in for a stronger bond. I pin a lot of my stuff though. 

 

As as far as water and CA, I read that the water removes the air when bonding allowing for quicker activation of the glue. I tried it and it took longer than I wanted so I haven't used it since. 

 

Another note on zip kicker is it can ruin paint. I primed a model plane on the spru then started assembly. When I used Zip it got on my fingers and the paint where I was holding and it rubbed off. 

 

Mad Jack that's pretty much all I have been able to find. The APS stuff smells different than the others I have. I also think a lot of the stuff could be produced in the same factory with very little changes. I worked for a company in high school on the evening shift that produced popcorn. When from one brand to the next just the packaging was changed, when extra "butter" was needed the oil dial was turned up. 

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Allot of times I've used a small needle dropper bottle like what you can get at Hobby Lobby (in with the model supplies) or my preferred choice, Flex-i-file's Touch n Flow dropper bottle. I fill it with the Bob Smith Indus. one & just drop a few drops into whatever I'm gluing. No mess with a spray. I have noticed thou the HL one isn't as air tight as the FiF one. Eventually, I'll see the CA inside the bottle start to turn to a dark brown color. I might be due to the size of the needle, the HL one is significantly larger in diameter then the FiF. 

 

I have noticed the Zip Kicker brand tends to change colors on when it comes in contact with superglue vs BS one. I use Gorilla brand.

 

I've been using ZK spray lately thou. Mainly cause I need a new FiF bottle & I'd have to order from their site or order it thru my local hobby store + I'm trying to finally get rid of the spray. I've had it probably going on 10 years now, ha ha.

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Thanks to all for sharing their experiences and information. I have to admit that I've had such varied luck with CA that I have taken to pinning pieces when I use it, if there is enough "meat" on the parts to allow drilling.

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one of my friends told me - seriously - lick the part where it's going to join (Obviously NOT the superglue part) that must be due to what Kangaroorx is talking about above with water

 

and I think it was here, on these forums, someone mentioned using baking soda as an accelerant. Omg it works! I was shocked. I don't know if it also makes the bond weaker or not. 

 

I usually use plastic melt glue, as opposed to CA, if I can, but lately I've been doing more resin and of course bones, which only CA works on, so I've been thinking about getting an accelerator as well. The baking soda is great but also pretty messy hehe

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The baking soda can also provide a structural element and  help fill small gaps. 

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10 hours ago, Jeepnewbie said:

The baking soda is very interesting idea. How do you apply it? Sprinkle it over the spot while holding the pieces together?

 

I may be doing it "wrong" but I basically dipped one side in it (say if it were an arm) and then applied glue to the other; other pieces yes I basically sprinkled it while holding them together. Wait til fully dry, brush off with makeup brush.

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I learned the baking soda/ ca glue from darksword marike reimer dvd, she puts the baking soda in the slot and uses ca glue on other part then fitting them together.

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