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TheMandolin

Trouble with washes - Newbie painter

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45 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

Sounds like you should post some of your minis to show off! We'd all love to see them! 

Ha! My friends have nothing to compare them to but I've been stalking mini painting forums for a while now and know they're terrible. But I had so much fun painting them who cares?

 

Well that poor gnome's face might care but who asked him :P 

Mangu.JPG

Orc Marauder - Axe.JPG

Bear.JPG

Gnome Mage.jpg

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The nice part about the price of Bones figures is you can keep trying techniques out on them and they are not that expensive.  Just base coat a figure and then practice applying a wash.  You can then always strip it and do it all over again or just grab another one and try again.  You'll get the hang of it soon I am sure.  I know washes were hit or miss for me until after doing a bunch and then something just clicked.  Seems like any technique is like this for me.  Just keep at it!

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More to the point, those figures looking pretty good! Keep it up!

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You're painting 'within the lines' so your brush control is pretty decent already. 

I assume that you already do dry brushing, also. 

 

Yup. Yet another new painter that is already better than me. 

 

 

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I just use the Army Painter and Secret Weapon washes, particularly Army Painter brown Strong Tone, Army black Painter Dark Tone, and Secret Weapon Stone Wash. For just over ten bucks, you don't have to go through all the newbie headache that you're going through right now. Army Painter also sells a Quickshade Ink set of washes (the eyedroppers). 

Edited by ced1106
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5 hours ago, ced1106 said:

I just use the Army Painter and Secret Weapon washes, particularly Army Painter brown Strong Tone, Army black Painter Dark Tone, and Secret Weapon Stone Wash. For just over ten bucks, you don't have to go through all the newbie headache that you're going through right now. Army Painter also sells a Quickshade Ink set of washes (the eyedroppers). 

 

I did buy two Citadel "Shades" (Nightshade and Violet, I know I should have started with a brown or black but they were so pretty!) when I wanted to confirm that it was something I was doing to the washes.  I might also pick up some brown/black ones (I will look into Army Painter and Secret Weapon, how do they compare to Citadel? which is what my FLGS stocks by the bushel) as it seems like I am wasting a lot of paint making washes for one mini at a time. But I would like to get to the point where I can mix up washes, glazes and all the other techniques I see online for future use too!

 

Side note: I have been shaking bottles like its going out of style and using distilled water and that seems to have really helped with the speckly granular paint problem! Thanks everyone! Now to practice applying the actual technique better. 

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Pretty is good! :D

 

Here's an article which compares Citadel vs. Army Painter washes. Unfortunately, it's a few years old. Let me know if you find anything more recent! 

http://taleofpainters.blogspot.de/2013/08/review-army-painter-warpaints.html

 

I also posted a SWM washes article on BGG : https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1129305/how-select-wash-secret-weapon-washes-link-review-s

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It's always interesting to see work in the embryonic stages, but this stands out.  I've found that it's often possible to figure out where a person might go in the future by looking at what they're doing in the beginning.  More specifically, looking at the work to try and see the thinking behind it.  Learn to Paint kits are good for it, because everybody starts with the same instruction, but the results are still unique. 

 

What I mean by this, to bring it back a bit from the abstract, is that I can tell that you're ahead of the curve with the mental game of painting miniatures.  This can be a bit of a subtle tell, because it's not necessarily about the immediate result (since early work is, by necessity, largely always a bit primitive).  It's more that I can see how you applied the instruction by sort of reverse-engineering the steps.  By doing this, I can usually tell who gets the feel for the work quickly and who might have to plug away at it for it to click (I'm a brute-force learner) and it looks to me like you have a good head for figuring out the "why" of doing things.

 

Learn everything you can, experiment, and fill your toolbox.  You've got potential.

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2 hours ago, TheMandolin said:

as it seems like I am wasting a lot of paint making washes for one mini at a time.

 

 Never worry about wasting paint.

 

Aside from Black and White, even if you're painting entire armies there is little chance of you using up a full bottle of paint anytime in the next two or three years unless you start painting multiple huge dragons... I seem to recall Anne Foerster, who is in charge of the Reaper paint lines, mentioning at some point that there's approximately around 400-500 "drops" of paint in the 1/2 ounce paint bottles, and folks here on the boards can tell you that some of us are still regularly using old Citadel and Ral Partha paints we bought in the '80's.

Relatively speaking, paint is inexpensive and easily replaced, so never worry about using too much paint.  Especially when you get to the point of mixing your own colors, you can go through a lot of experiments until you get just the right shade you want, and the results will be more than worth the little bit of paint you "wasted" to get there.

 

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17 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 Never worry about wasting paint.

 

Aside from Black and White, even if you're painting entire armies there is little chance of you using up a full bottle of paint anytime in the next two or three years unless you start painting multiple huge dragons... I seem to recall Anne Foerster, who is in charge of the Reaper paint lines, mentioning at some point that there's approximately around 400-500 "drops" of paint in the 1/2 ounce paint bottles, and folks here on the boards can tell you that some of us are still regularly using old Citadel and Ral Partha paints we bought in the '80's.

Relatively speaking, paint is inexpensive and easily replaced, so never worry about using too much paint.  Especially when you get to the point of mixing your own colors, you can go through a lot of experiments until you get just the right shade you want, and the results will be more than worth the little bit of paint you "wasted" to get there.

 

 

Like this advice. I'm a miser when it comes to my little paint drops although I'm relaxing a bit. Like the sculptors have "filler" models to use up any excess mixed putty I have filler models. My medieval russian army is assembled and primed along with a few other random minis at any time. When I slop out too much paint I switch to one of them and paint until it's used up instead of losing a drop. I'm normally not that anal retentive about things but for some reason I hate seeing paint go to waste. I mean it cost me a penny or two for that drop of paint! :lol:

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2 hours ago, Mad Jack said:

I seem to recall Anne Foerster, who is in charge of the Reaper paint lines, mentioning at some point that there's approximately around 400-500 "drops" of paint in the 1/2 ounce paint bottles,

 

That is very reassuring!

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2 hours ago, buglips*the*goblin said:

Learn everything you can, experiment, and fill your toolbox.  You've got potential.

 

Thank you very much!! Also thanks for all the WIPs and tips you post, they are awesome, encouraging and inspiring. Pretty sure I found this forum and Reaper in general, googling "wth is drybrushing" and finding your guide!

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One thing nobody discussed by is oil washes.  If you gloss coat your model and then wash it with thinned down oil paint, then you can get excellent results. The flow, the consistency, and the workability are big advantages.  The extra work isn't for everybody but it really does very well.  Just something to keep in mind.  Most folk are better off with simpler acrylic washes though.

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Just one note about 'wasting' paint. There are some paints you might want to be careful about, and that's colours that have gone out of production, or are only available on special occasions.

 

Every october Reaper usually adds 'Breast Cancer Awareness Pink' for free to all orders. That's the most well-known...

(And most of us have 'a few' of those, so probably not a good example)

There's the holidays set with christmas themed names. This has been available the last 2 decembers. Whether or not it will be for sale next december, or if you can actally manage to snag one is anyone's guess.

There's some available for ReaperCon(some can be bought by buying the 'swag bag' online, but not necessarily all of them)

And there's the free Sample paints that Reaper sometimes adds to orders. Those are usually batches of paint that came out the slightly wrong colour. Instead of driving it to a recycler, they bottle it up and give it away. you will never see that exact colour again. 

These are the paints that we don't squander the drops from.

(I rate my 'special edition as 'Touch these without permission and I break your fingers', and the OOP and one-shots as 'They will never find the body'. Well, maybe not literally... There will be yelling, though. )

 

400 - 500 drops in a bottle?

That sounds about right.

One cubic centimeter(1ml) of water is 20 raindrops. That would give 340 drops from a 17ml bottle, but paint have different density and surface tensions, so yeah.

 

So, don't lick your brush, don't drink the Brown Liner(not without also offering Buglips some, also), and have fun. Those are the rules of the hobby.

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