Jump to content

Valthorn_Illian

Reaper and Tru Color (I need some serious help)

Recommended Posts

So, as most of you may know, I'm not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed and recently I volunteered myself to help out at a local convention/competition. Rivercon in Shreveport, LA if you were wondering. By help out I mean I offered to provide the paint, bones, and supplies to run a Reaper paint and take table during the show. Well I'm a bit lost because the group president and has asked me to add some Tru Color (who are one of sponsors and provided a fairly large sample) paints to the table as well as do a demo. While the demo is fine, I have honestly never heard of Tru Color before this and since the company site has it listed as a solvent based paint I'm not sure about the out come if we use it. So if you fine folks could fill me in on the finer points the paint and how it reacts to Bones figures that would be a big help.

 

Big question: is this an enamel paint?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From their site/FAQ:

 

Tru-Color Paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that is designed to be airbrushed directly from the bottle without thinning.  Tru-Color Paint can be blended to produce a variety of shades and hues for your specific product needs.  Although Tru-Color Paint contains a small percentage of acetone we DO NOT RECOMMEND that acetone be used to thin (dilute) the Tru-Color Paint.  Adding just acetone to thin Tru-Color Paint may harm the intended gloss or semi-gloss finish our paint is intended to give as it will dry too fast.  Also, too much acetone will cause the solvent system to evaporate too quickly during air brushing causing the painted surface to appear rough and/or it may blush.

 

Also in the FAQs they say you can use a primer when doing models, which I''m assuming would be styrene or whatever train models are made out of. Also thinning they recommend their own brand of thinner (which isn't uncommon as most brands say to stick with their own for no compatibility issues.).

 

To be honest I've never heard of them I was thinking made it was Floquil rebranded or such but this isn't the case.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess you're going to need to do some testing. The solvent has a "small percentage" of acetone, so may not have enough to affect the figures. 

 

Maybe you could tell the participants to put a layer of paint on the Bones to reduce the effect of the acetone in the Tru-Color paint? Worth a shot.

 

Here's how another product with acetone fared with Bones. : 

 

Edited by ced1106
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just say, "Sure, I don't mind demoing how to airbrush with a solvent-based paint in a room full of unprotected people and lacking ventilation"

 

Then add "it's a no smoking area, right?"

 

Frankly, I wouldn't demo that stuff even with brushes. It's a SOLVENT-based paint! 

That means GOOD VENTILATION. 

It doesn't matter if the concentration is so low as to be undetectable. It takes only ONE know-it-all elfhole to call the OSHA or whoever and get everything shut down. 

 

And it's kind of difficult to demot anything with an extration hood in the way...

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gadgetman! said:

just say, "Sure, I don't mind demoing how to airbrush with a solvent-based paint in a room full of unprotected people and lacking ventilation"

 

Then add "it's a no smoking area, right?"

 

Frankly, I wouldn't demo that stuff even with brushes. It's a SOLVENT-based paint! 

That means GOOD VENTILATION. 

It doesn't matter if the concentration is so low as to be undetectable. It takes only ONE know-it-all elfhole to call the OSHA or whoever and get everything shut down. 

 

And it's kind of difficult to demot anything with an extration hood in the way...

 

I think you might have just gotten me out of using these.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Valthorn_Illian said:

So, as most of you may know, I'm not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed and recently I volunteered myself to help out at a local convention/competition. Rivercon in Shreveport, LA if you were wondering. By help out I mean I offered to provide the paint, bones, and supplies to run a Reaper paint and take table during the show. Well I'm a bit lost because the group president and has asked me to add some Tru Color (who are one of sponsors and provided a fairly large sample) paints to the table as well as do a demo. While the demo is fine, I have honestly never heard of Tru Color before this and since the company site has it listed as a solvent based paint I'm not sure about the out come if we use it. So if you fine folks could fill me in on the finer points the paint and how it reacts to Bones figures that would be a big help.

 

Big question: is this an enamel paint?

Based on the discussion and what has been revealed about these paints I would recommend that you get together with the Con Organizers and  explain the logistical and technical difficulties involved in attempting to demo these paints.

You might suggest that if the Paint Company is willing to provide the necessary Safety Equipment it might be possible to demo their products if arrangements can be made with the host facility for proper venting of the exhaust.

Of course, that is also dependent on there being somebody available with the appropriate skill level in using an airbrush to do the demonstration.

GEM

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also offer to not use the paints, but put them in clear view during the demo so people will see the brand name at least? That might make the sponsor happy

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used this point through the airbrush although it has been a fairly long time ago but I have a couple posts on my blog about it:

 

http://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2014/07/airbrushing-freight-cars-with-tru-scale.html

 

http://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2014/12/another-round-of-boxcars-painting.html

 

I had a lot of success with it. At the time I did this it could not be brush painted, airbrush was the only way to apply it (and I did try). They were going to develop a variation for brush work but I don't know if that ever happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×